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An entertaining comedy that makes people laugh and feel good. Now that is what I call something special.

There is something that is nice about a movie that knows what it is and does not take itself too seriously. The Hangover is one of these films. Here is a picture that does not strive for greatness- it just wants to make you laugh. There is absolutely nothing wrong with that. Doug (Justin Bartha) is getting married in two days to Tracy (Sasha ...

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Review by: shaunhenisey

Added: 8 years ago

 

And they call Eli Roth callous?

The FINAL DESTINATION franchise - never the most noble series (the first is the only worthwhile film, just) - hits what is thus far its low point in the David R. Ellis-directed THE FINAL DESTINATION. Further proving that the 3D bandwagon is not one in which directors hop on for the purposes of good filmmaking, this redundant continuation of the ...

Read more

Review by: TomElce

Added: 8 years ago

I could watch this movie again and again -- so long as I concentrated only on the spectacular images.

Director David Yates's HARRY POTTER AND THE HALF-BLOOD PRINCE is consistently visually stunning -- a real feast for the eyes. The story -- not so much. Always entertaining but rarely more than mildly so, the movie takes over an hour of just taxiing around the cinematic runway before it attempts liftoff. The result is a movie that is never ...

Read more

Review by: SteveRhodes

Added: 8 years ago

 

Moments of brilliance, many more moments of boredom.

ennifer's Body comes loaded with a pretty big freight of expectation: it's Diablo Cody's first script since her Oscar winning Juno, for one thing, and for another, it's pneumatic robot-bait starlet Megan Fox's first high-profile role outside the Transformers films which demanded of her only the ability to look sweaty, hit her mark, and have really ...

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Review by: thesubstream

Added: 8 years ago

Brüno

Genre: Comedy

The main problem with BRUNO is that this mockumentary isn’t as realistic or believable as BORAT.

I watched the R rated version on DVD – the version that had been prohibited in Australian cinemas. I wish I hadn’t. I was flashed a good 30 second screen shot of Sacha Baron Cohen’s penis shouting “Bruno” and I’m still recovering from the post traumatic stress of that frightful vision. The main problem with BRUNO is that this mockumentary isn’t as ...

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Review by: TimVoon

Added: 8 years ago

 

If this isn’t enough to bring a tear to your eye, then you may have a heart of stone.

THE SECRET LIFE OF BEES is based on a bestselling novel by Sue Monk Kid. Like any novel of some given success it becomes a target for some Hollywood executive in the hopes of being a lucrative endeavour. In this case, I believe that one of the list of executive producers were the Smiths (Jade and Will). It had moderate success at the US box office ...

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Review by: TimVoon

Added: 8 years ago

It many ways I suppose The 40 Year-Old Virgin is the birth of the bromantic comedy.

Shaun Henisey picks the Top 25 films of the decade. To view his other picks, click here. 25. The 40 Year-Old Virgin It many ways I suppose The 40 Year-Old Virgin is the birth of the bromantic comedy. There have been numerous rip off's of this formula (vulgar with a heart) over the last several years, but there are none that exhibit the spirit and ...

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Review by: shaunhenisey

Added: 8 years ago

 

Few films have been as misunderstood as Stephen Spielberg's A.I.

50. A.I. Artificial Intelligence Few films have been as misunderstood as Stephen Spielberg's A.I. - Artificial Intelligence. Originally intended to be a Stanley Kubrick production, when Spielberg announced that he was taking over the project after Kubrick's death, the media and critical community were skeptical at best. I remember viewing the ...

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Review by: shaunhenisey

Added: 8 years ago

A good try at Christmas humour but somehow it is lacking true mirth and good cheer.

Christmas draws nigh again and on its tail is a trail of Hollywood movie offerings released to lighten the pockets of holiday viewers. I missed the release of FOUR CHRISTMASES last year, but it has arrived on DVD this year on Santa’s sleigh. For some reason a lot of Christmas movies feature dysfunctional people in dysfunctional families, and ...

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Review by: TimVoon

Added: 8 years ago

 

I realised I had gone through 90 minutes of horror without feeling any tension or fright.

On occasion, I do like to borrow a mindless movie about zombies/mutants who wreak death and destruction on the world, and I got exactly what I asked for – the mindless bit. The year is somewhere in the future, on some distant planet where a mysterious machine hidden beneath the earth is converting the dead and dying into killer zombies. Throw into...

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Review by: TimVoon

Added: 8 years ago

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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;There is something that is nice about a movie that knows what it is and does not take itself too seriously. The Hangover is one of these films. Here is a picture that does not strive for greatness- it just wants to make you laugh. There is absolutely nothing wrong with that. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Doug (Justin Bartha) is getting married in two days to Tracy (Sasha Barrese). His best friends Phil (Bradley Cooper) and Stu (Ed Helms) decide to take Doug to Las Vegas for a night of debauchery- an extended bachelors night to celebrate male freedom before Doug is forced to succumb to marriage, that great mystical journey that men take that somehow castrates them. As an offer of diplomacy (and charity) Doug agrees to take his soon-to-be brother in law, Alan (Zach Galifianakis) on the trip- this decision will come to haunt him mere hours later. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;If you are reading this you probably know the plot. The four men (boys?) get wasted and end up waking up the next day with a killer hangover. As Stu, Phil and Alan awake they discover themselves in a 4200.00 a night destroyed hotel room, a live chicken, a crying baby stuffed in a closet, and a Bengal tiger in the bathroom. To make matters worse, Stu (a dentist) loses both an incisor and an engagement ring (or, more appropriately, his grandmother’s “holocaust ring”), Phil has a hospital band around his wrist, and no one has any idea where the hell Doug is. All of this happens in the first twenty minutes of the movie. From this point on, the film is a non-stop comedy, placing our three heroes in bizarre situation after situation. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I think it is fitting to point out that a lesser film would have included the bachelor party, and ended with the gentlemen waking up in a hotel room. The “Bachelor Party picture” is as cliché as the romantic comedy. The Hangover works so well because it keeps the party off of the screen. The film works, on a certain level anyway, like a mystery. We become invested in the story because we actually do want to know where Doug is, who the baby belongs to, and where the hell the tiger came from. The journey takes us to some strange places, but one thing is certain, we never stop laughing. This is one of the best broad comedies in years. Even when I wasn’t laughing out loud at the film, I always found myself smiling about the plight of the characters. As someone who has had his fair share of crazy nights, I can picture some friends of mine getting themselves into these types of situations. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The film is another in a long line of “bromantic comedies” surrounding men and their desire to escape maturity. It is not necessarily the best (that would be “The 40 Year-Old Virgin”) but it is one of the funniest and most accessible. The film is certainly profane (four letter words aplenty) but it is not as lewd as some of the other films that have hit theaters recently. While nudity and nonstop sex jokes definitely don’t bother me (I have a vivid imagination) they can prevent certain comedies from being enjoyed on a universal level. The Hangover is funny not because of its willingness to gross us out, or push the R rating even, but because it has genuinely funny situations and characters. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;While I will not say that the heroes in The Hangover are the most complex to ever grace the screen, they have enough depth to make them interesting. Stu is a cuckold who has a cheating girlfriend (the hilarious Rachael Harris) who treats him like trash. He dresses like she packed his clothes for him and is forced to lie about going to Vegas. This is not necessarily a caricature; I have seen countless men in similar situations- lacking the self confidence to stand up for themselves. Phil, the leader of the group, could have easily been the most one-dimensional character in the film, yet for some reason we understand his need to escape from the confines of his life with his wife and child. As pleasant as adulthood may be there is always a side to most men that wants to go crazy and be free, if even for one night. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Then there is Alan. The real discovery in this picture is the great Zach Galifianakis playing the child like buffoon. Galifianakis’s performance as Alan will be this generation's Bluto. I may be overreacting, but I think the performance is Oscar worthy. What makes Galifiankis so funny is the fact that he plays Alan completely straight. When Alan asks the concierge at Caesar’s Palace if Caesar actually lived there, we laugh out loud because the look on Alan’s face is so innocent and earnest. If you have seen the movie, watch it again. This time pay close attention to the Galifianakis’s performance. He could be in a drama he plays the character so deadpan. There is not a moment of over-acting in the performance, only exceptional comic timing and the ability to play completely dry. Alan has the film’s best lines, but it is only because Galifianakis makes them the best lines through his delivery. Mark my words, twenty years from now people may not remember the intricacies in the plot of The Hangover, but they will remember Alan- just like no one remembers anything else that happened in National Lampoon’s Animal House, but they remember John Belushi’s Bluto. They are both iconic performances. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The director, Todd Phillips, has a gift for situational comedy. His Old School was one of the funniest films of the decade, and here he surpasses himself. While one can give credit to the screenwriters, Jon Lucas and Scott Moore, for the jokes and situations, it is Phillips who directed the actors and knew when to cut, and what takes to use. He is by no means the best comedic director working today (that would be Judd Apatow) but he is the best at this type of broad comedy. I think this is why I didn’t include The Hangover in my recent “Best of” list for the decade. In hindsight, it was a mistake. Here is a film that you really don’t appreciate on the first viewing. I remember watching the film for the first time. My wife and I laughed, and when it was over said “that was a funny movie” and went about our business. We watched it again recently, and this time I knew the gags were coming so I was able to pay more attention to the performances, direction, and choices. It was on this second viewing I discovered the brilliance of The Hangover- it is a movie that completely and totally knows what it is and what it’s about. It is not trying to be a “comedy with heart” or a “message movie.” Phillips, along with the cast, just wants us to enjoy ourselves. There is not a love story tacked on for female audiences, or a touching moment of bromance at the end, it is just the story of four misfits in Vegas. A weaker director would have insisted on developing themes, or adding a heartwarming moment. I kept expecting a scene with Tracy leaving Doug and then Doug winning her back, or some nonsense. It never happens. This is because Phillips is confident in his direction and his decisions. He doesn’t care what the movie could be; only what it is- an entertaining comedy that makes people laugh and feel good. Now that is what I call something special. Now if only I could figure out where the hell that chicken came from. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;NOTE- There are many surprises in The Hangover. I have failed to mention appearances by Heather Graham, Ken Jeong and Mike Tyson. These actors are wonderful and are in the movie because they fit. Could you imagine anyone else? &lt;/p&gt;'
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short-body => 'There is something that is nice about a movie that knows what it is and does not take itself too seriously. The Hangover is one of these films. Here is a picture that does not strive for greatness- it just wants to make you laugh. There is absolutely nothing wrong with that. Doug (Justin Bartha) is getting married in two days to Tracy (Sasha ...'
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;The FINAL DESTINATION franchise - never the most noble series (the first is the only worthwhile film, just) - hits what is thus far its low point in the David R. Ellis-directed THE FINAL DESTINATION. Further proving that the 3D bandwagon is not one in which directors hop on for the purposes of good filmmaking, this redundant continuation of the franchise trades in the same redundant, meticulously telegraphed set-pieces of its predecessors while continuing to fit the franchise bill of having approximately zero soul. To make things worse, the acting this time is as dreadful as it's ever been, simple conversations in cafes and shopping centers here turned into the very representation of what we may all a cine-faceplant.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;A laughably contrived pile-up-cum-gruefest-cum-collapse at a speedway venue is that which is prophesized by lead protagonist Nick O'Bannon (Bobby Campo, a poor man's Justin Chatwin), Nick naturally uprooting himself, his friends and a few other third wheels so that they miss out on the fun of the film's hollow opening twelve. Naturally, death's not done with these nincompoops, following them to swimming pools, car washes and hospitals in the name of elaborate death sequences, though the only stand-out sequence here is one of a near-death in the aforementioned car wash. Everything else is so rigorously, eye-rollingly built upon before ahead of time that even the most callous viewers won't be able to take sick pleasure from the grim demises on show. The only death that isn't signaled fifteen miles off is one that arrives as a bad joke, a character daring to talk of deja vu and promptly getting struck down.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;For his part, David R. Ellis (of another entry in the series, the mediocre FINAL DESTINATION 2) directs with something approaching assurance, yet even then its woefully misplaced assurance. Ellis's filmography stands as that of a schlockmeister not a filmmaker but the prize for hack of the entire production should be bestowed upon screenwriter Eric Bress, who doesn't so much craft a thoughtful or existential plot with a beginning, middle and end so much as he cobbles together a bunch of rote concepts that either bask in unoriginality (a stone flying through the air and taking someone's eye out? How quaint.) or obnoxiously reflect the very movie's existence (as in a last act revelatory collection of deaths in a theatre), all while molding characters who are pretty much all-around jackasses. The FINAL DESTINATION movies have never made for profound horror-themed entertainment, but they've seldom been as insufferable and bereft of soul as this trash. And they call Eli Roth callous?&lt;/p&gt;'
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short-body => 'The FINAL DESTINATION franchise - never the most noble series (the first is the only worthwhile film, just) - hits what is thus far its low point in the David R. Ellis-directed THE FINAL DESTINATION. Further proving that the 3D bandwagon is not one in which directors hop on for the purposes of good filmmaking, this redundant continuation of the ...'
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;Director David Yates's HARRY POTTER AND THE HALF-BLOOD PRINCE is consistently visually stunning -- a real feast for the eyes. The story -- not so much.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Always entertaining but rarely more than mildly so, the movie takes over an hour of just taxiing around the cinematic runway before it attempts liftoff. The result is a movie that is never disappointing but rarely soars. And the ending is jarringly abrupt, serving mainly as a commercial for the next movie in the series.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;On the good side, this adaptation of another of author J.K. Rowling's novels will satisfy the fans while never boring those who have never read any of the books. A warning is due however. If you haven't read any of the books and haven't seen at least some of the movies, HARRY POTTER AND THE HALF-BLOOD PRINCE is likely to leave you baffled throughout much of the movie, since it makes huge assumptions in how much knowledge you have going into the theater.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;For the record, I've seen all of the films, with my favorite being HARRY POTTER AND THE ORDER OF THE PHOENIX, the previous one in the series, and have read none of the books. While I admire the film series, they generally seem to be preaching to the choir, assuming that the audience is filled, as it is usually is, with avid readers of the books. I did notice this time that, while my packed audience cheered loudly during the opening credits, as if a rock star had just stepped on the stage, the reaction during the ending credits was surprisingly muted, with only scattered applause, which is not like the reaction at most early screenings for Harry Potter movies.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The cinematography by Bruno Delbonnel is consistently fabulous. The best visual sequences aren't the special effects shots, of which they are many extremely impressive ones, but the more simple ones. Rarely has heavy rain felt so dark and ominous and evoked such a strong, overwhelming sense of mood. I could watch this movie again and again -- so long as I concentrated only on the spectacular images.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;There is nothing wrong with the story itself, but it is rarely compelling for non-Potter devotees. The best part of the plot is the introduction of an evil character called Tom Riddle. Riddle, at age 16, is playing with just the right amount of creepy wickedness by Frank Dillane. I won't tell you more about him, lest I give away too much.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The weakest parts of the narrative are the excessively chaste romances. In a movie populated with kids, most of whom appear to be about twenty-years-old, why are the filmmakers so scared that showing more than a microsecond kiss will scandalize the viewers? After all, the film is pretty happy to frighten the little kids in the audience, of which there will be many. One kid close to me screamed out, &amp;quot;Mommy, I don't like it!&amp;quot; during the terrifying opening sequence in which a major pedestrian bridge in London collapses, causing hundreds of people to perish quite realistically.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;HARRY POTTER AND THE HALF-BLOOD PRINCE is a don't-miss movie for Potter fans. That much is certain. For others, it is worth seeing if you are willing to commit to spending the full two-and-one-half-plus hours. You don't want to start watching it unless you are willing to see it all, since the second half is when the story finally starts picking up.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;HARRY POTTER AND THE HALF-BLOOD PRINCE runs 2:33. It is rated PG for &amp;quot;scary images, some violence, language and mild sensuality&amp;quot; and would be acceptable for kids around 9 and up.&lt;/p&gt;'
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;ennifer's Body comes loaded with a pretty big freight of expectation: it's Diablo Cody's first script since her Oscar winning Juno, for one thing, and for another, it's pneumatic robot-bait starlet Megan Fox's first high-profile role outside the Transformers films which demanded of her only the ability to look sweaty, hit her mark, and have really impressive bone structure. Is Cody's slang laced pop culture patois going to get tiring? Is Megan Fox able to... express emotions? Director Karyn Kusama's film has as much or more cinematic meta-interest as a significant milestone early in the careers of women like Cody and Fox, who seem possibly preordained, blessed and golden, to have enormous impacts on Hollywood filmmaking as it does interest for a dude who like scary movie, you know, with the demons and junk.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Which is good because the film itself isn't that great. Fox plays the titular Jennifer, who through some ham-handed Satan worshipin' by a local mascara'ed indie band finds herself possessed by a succubus-like demon. Needy, played by Amanda Seyfried, is the Betty to Fox's murderous Veronica, and watches helplessly as her best friend cuts a swathe through their town's population of horny teenage boys. It's an odd amalgam that doesn't quite hang together in any satisfying, compelling way while still boasting storytelling elements that are miles more interesting and sophisticated than the muddy average of all the film's scenes. It's poorly paced and never scary, but there are a handful or three scenes that approach the eeriness of well if not The Shining then maybe the pretty eerie Johnathan Glazer directed video for &amp;quot;Karmacoma&amp;quot; by Massive Attack that was inspired by The Shining. And surprisingly, it's not Cody's famously attention-grabbing oddball dialogue that sucks the spookiness out of some of what should be the scary scenes in the film, its that the film has pinned to its sleeve half of the accoutrements of a horror film - the set up, the demon, the small town, the spooky rotten set-dec - without supporting them with any real careful adhesion to the more technical traditions of the genre. There no real HOLY SHIT jump-scare moments in the film, no shadows-of-feet-under-the-closet-door hide quiet hide moments to build tension. It says its a horror film, but it's not.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Which is a shame, because underneath all of the stuff that doesn't quite work is a film about teenage girl best friends that is spectacular. The relationship between Needy and Jennifer rings totally true, even as it descends into bloody mayhem and is by far the most compelling thing in the film. This is down to Cody's script: Rajo pointed it out and its true that unlike in Cody's first film Juno, where everyone seems to live in a hyperwitty pop-culture minutiae literate alt-universe with some language that's somehow related to English, Cody in the script for Jennifer's Body confines most of her famous argot to the two teen best friend girls. It's a &amp;quot;secret language&amp;quot; filled with in-jokes and very real-seeming tics and hiccups that annoy the rest of the characters in the film. It's not just fun and funny and Cody/Tarantinoish, it's real solid character work and it makes their friendship the best bit in the film. It's good enough, and rare enough a thing to see done (as most teen girl movies are made for the tween demo, seemingly, brainless where Jennifer's Body, at least, is not) that I'd recommend the film despite the failure of its central stated goal: being scary.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The performances are great: Fox is legitimately good as the Demon Babe, consistently hitting the rightish note in a role that would be really easy to blow up into pantomime sex-bot ridiculousness. On the meta-level, coming off as she was at the time her star-if-not-making-then-beginning-to-make turn in Transformers, its nice to see Fox take a role that will ultimately be overshadowed by her co-star's. Jennifer's Body is not going to do much for Fox's career, but it should do tonnes for Amanda Seyfried's. It's her film entirely, from start to finish, and its odd but not unexpected that, from looking at the film's promo material, you'd never know she was in the film. Cody will go on, Seyfried and Fox will go on, they'll all have interesting full careers, and their collaboration will go down as a film whose quirky combo of genres and styles produced a handfull of standout moments and scenes but ultimately never gelled. 6/10.&lt;/p&gt;'
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short-body => 'ennifer's Body comes loaded with a pretty big freight of expectation: it's Diablo Cody's first script since her Oscar winning Juno, for one thing, and for another, it's pneumatic robot-bait starlet Megan Fox's first high-profile role outside the Transformers films which demanded of her only the ability to look sweaty, hit her mark, and have really ...'
teaser => 'Moments of brilliance, many more moments of boredom.'
title => 'Jennifer's Body'
type-id => 6
4 =>
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;I watched the R rated version on DVD – the version that had been prohibited in Australian cinemas. I wish I hadn’t. I was flashed a good 30 second screen shot of Sacha Baron Cohen’s penis shouting “Bruno” and I’m still recovering from the post traumatic stress of that frightful vision.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The main problem with BRUNO is that this mockumentary isn’t as realistic or believable as BORAT. It doesn’t even come close. I couldn’t believe in the persona of BRUNO, that this was a male model from Austria trying to make it big in the Entertainment industry in the US. Whilst I could believe in the persona of BORAT, a good will ambassador from Kazakhstan who had come to learn the cultural ways of the USA.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt; A lot of the situations set up for this Austrian model entertainer seem staged and artificial and are not particularly funny. However, one has to give some kudos for Sacha Cohen for being able to physically transform himself into a blonde, gay model – he is virtually unrecognisable from his Ali G and Borat personas. I also feel that Sacha Cohen tries overly hard in this movie to try to outdo and out shock what he achieved with Borat. I found Borat genuinely funny in some scenarios, exposing some great flaws in the Myth that America is the greatest nation on earth. However, the scenarios in BRUNO are just crude and shocking for the sake of being crude and shocking. A good example is the flapping penis waving about the screen, screaming “Bruno”.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt; Other offensive scenes include a simulated gay sex leather scene where he is leather bound to his Austrian lover and hopping around town. Trying to sneak into the tents of male hunters in the middle of the night was just creepy. Trying to learn martial arts from an expert in order to defend against gay men was silly. Serving food on a fat naked person whilst interviewing Paula Abdul and sitting on Mexican workers was distasteful. Not even the sing a long at the end with Bono (U2) and Elton John could save this movie. Personally, I felt that they looked uncomfortable on screen chirping out the words of some bizarre song. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt; My main gripe with BRUNO is that I just didn’t find it funny at all. &lt;/p&gt;'
alias => 'bruno_by_timvoon'
dt-publish => '8 years ago'
genre =>
__attr__id => 2
name => 'Comedy'
logo => 'logo.jpg'
movie =>
__attr__id => 67
cover => 'cover.jpg'
title => 'Brüno'
rating => 20
reviewer =>
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avatar => 'default.jpg'
login => 'TimVoon'
review-count => 19
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short-body => 'I watched the R rated version on DVD – the version that had been prohibited in Australian cinemas. I wish I hadn’t. I was flashed a good 30 second screen shot of Sacha Baron Cohen’s penis shouting “Bruno” and I’m still recovering from the post traumatic stress of that frightful vision. The main problem with BRUNO is that this mockumentary isn’t as ...'
teaser => 'The main problem with BRUNO is that this mockumentary isn’t as realistic or believable as BORAT.'
title => 'Bruno'
type-id => 6
5 =>
__attr__id => 790
__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;THE SECRET LIFE OF BEES is based on a bestselling novel by Sue Monk Kid. Like any novel of some given success it becomes a target for some Hollywood executive in the hopes of being a lucrative endeavour. In this case, I believe that one of the list of executive producers were the Smiths (Jade and Will). It had moderate success at the US box office and was only made with a budget of 11 million.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The line up of actors is impressive which includes some of the music industry’s finest female African American artists - Alicia Keys and Jennifer Hudson who can both act well. Included is Dakota Fanning one of the few child actors who have made a successful transition to teenage actor and likely to adult actor as well. Queen Latifah wraps up the final major cast member and she is always a delight to watch on screen.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;This movie is designed to be a major tear jerker from the horrific opening scenes of domestic violence and death. Set in the 60’s of southern USA when racial violence and tension was still prevalent in the south. It is during this period of time when a child Lily Owens (Dakota Fanning) runs away from home with her house maid (Jennifer Hudson). The tone of the escape could almost be described as Huckleberry Finish with a twist of Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Both are fugitives, one is escaping her violent father (Paul Bettany) and the other is escaping the law for being rude to a white man. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;They find refuge with Bee Keeper/Honey Maker August Boatwright (Queen Latifah) and her sisters (Alicia Keys and Sophie Okenedo). It is here that the young girls find healing for their souls. Just as honey can be used to nourish the soul and heal wounds. The company of the Boatwright sisters act as balm for the spirits of the two escapees. It is here that the movie overflows with sisterly bonding – girls playing with each other’s hair, squirting each other with water, making cookies for each other, holding spiritual ceremonies and telling stories about a black Madonna. I was sure that I was drowning in treacle and molasses somewhere in the middle of the movie. This is not necessarily a bad thing. It is after all catered for all the mothers, daughters, aunts and grandmothers out there in the world who are crying for some identity and recognition. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;So the answer to the question lingering at the back of your mind is this a chick flick? YES it is. However, it is one of the better ones out there floating in the sea of Kleenex tissues and warm quilts. It is the story about the empowerment of black women in a white man’s world, about self discovery, forgiveness and redemption. If this isn’t enough to bring a tear to your eye, then you may have a heart of stone.&lt;/p&gt;'
alias => 'the_secret_life_of_bees'
dt-publish => '8 years ago'
genre =>
__attr__id => 4
name => 'Drama'
logo => 'logo.jpg'
movie =>
__attr__id => 605
cover => 'cover.jpg'
title => 'The Secret Life of Bees'
rating => 60
reviewer =>
__attr__id => 1409
avatar => 'default.jpg'
login => 'TimVoon'
review-count => 19
user-dir => 'user_files/'
short-body => 'THE SECRET LIFE OF BEES is based on a bestselling novel by Sue Monk Kid. Like any novel of some given success it becomes a target for some Hollywood executive in the hopes of being a lucrative endeavour. In this case, I believe that one of the list of executive producers were the Smiths (Jade and Will). It had moderate success at the US box office ...'
teaser => 'If this isn’t enough to bring a tear to your eye, then you may have a heart of stone.'
title => 'The Secret Life of Bees'
type-id => 6
6 =>
__attr__id => 780
__domel__body => 'Shaun Henisey picks the Top 25 films of the decade. To view his other picks, &lt;a href = 'http://www.filmnet.com/reviews/best_movies_of_the_decade_by_shaunhenisey_part2'&gt;click here.&lt;/a&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;25. The 40 Year-Old Virgin&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> It many ways I suppose The 40 Year-Old Virgin is the birth of the bromantic comedy. There have been numerous rip off's of this formula (vulgar with a heart) over the last several years, but there are none that exhibit the spirit and general hilarity of this movie. Here is a film that makes you constantly laugh while caring about the characters. The 40 Year-Old Virgin introduced the world to Judd Apatow (Virgin, Knocked-Up, Funny People) who is perhaps the smartest person in comedy today. This movie would be on the list due to its fantastic ending alone. This is a perfect background movie- you can sit and listen to it while doing other things (unless your family is over). <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> A true movie with a heart. This film is significant not only in its ability to make us laugh, but its ensemble cast as well. This is the film that introduced the world to not only Judd Apatow, but Steve Carell, Seth Rogen, Paul Rudd, Elizabeth Banks, Jane Lynch. Catherine Keener is brilliant as well. What a wonderful movie. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;24. The Bourne Ultimatum&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;The Bourne Ultimatum&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/780/TheBourneUltimatum.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> The Bourne Ultimatum could very well be the best pure action film of the decade. The action starts from the very beginning and is relentless until the end. The promises of the earlier, more uneven, installments in the Bourne franchise are all realized here. Matt Damon does an exceptional job in these films of giving his character realism and heart while also being engaged with ridiculous action sequences. The quick-editing, loathed by some in The Bourne Supremacy, is also tamed down here- with more coherent shots that focus on telling the story. If you are a fan of twists, car chases, fight scenes, or mystery there are few better experiences out there. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;23. Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Borat&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/780/Borat.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Sascha Baron Cohen creates one of the most ingenious and outrageous filmmaking devices with his creation of the character Borat Sagadiyev. Based on his alter-ego from HBO's Da Ali G Show, Borat: Cultural Learnings of America Make Benefit for Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan is funniest movie of the decade. It is certainly one of the funniest pictures of all time. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> In Borat, Cohen has created a loveable yet horribly racist, sexist and grotesque character. He then inserts the fictional character into real world situations. The comedy stems from the actions of Borat, but the brilliance and importance of the film comes from the human element- the people that do not know they are part of an act. It is amazing what people will do or say when they do not think someone is watching. Borat is just dumb enough, foreign enough, for them to put their guards down. We know Baron Cohen is joking when he is talking about the Jews, the homosexuals, or the inferiority of women- his real life co-stars do not. In his ridiculous set pieces, Cohen creates a portrait of the real American psyche- and it is certainly not as flattering as one would hope. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> But this is not to say that Borat is weighed down with seriousness. On the contrary, there are moments in this film of such audacity that they will be forever engrained in the history of comedic film. Cohen is fearless in his relentless attempts to garner a laugh. He puts himself in great physical danger in these elaborate set pieces, yet never breaks character. I read that Cohen was arrested multiple times in the making fo the film, and one particular set piece (the Rodeo scene in which Cohen sings the &quot;Kazakhstan National Anthem&quot; almost caused him to be lynched. Ironically, Cohen was not arrested in the films most outrageous (and hilarious) segment, in which he is involved in a fully nude wrestling match with his agent Asamat (Ken Davitian) in a crowded hotel. This is a movie to watch with a respirator near by.<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;22. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/780/EternalSunshineoftheSpotlessMind.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&quot;How happy is the blameless vestal's lot?&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The world forgetting, by the world forgot.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Eternal sunshine of the spotless mind.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Each prayer accepted and each wish resigned.”&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> - Alexander Pope<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Now here is a love story! Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, written by the extraordinary screenwriter Charlie Kaufman and directed by Michel Gondry, is a one of a kind modern love story. It is always unconventional- there is never a non-original moment in the film. It is this that makes is so special. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> What would you do if you could erase a loved one from your memory? If the loved one died, or left you, or broke your heart would you want to forget they ever existed? This is the central question posed to both Joel (Jim Carrey) and Clementine (Kate Winslet- in her best performance). Clementine is angry at Joel, you see, so she decides to see Dr. Mierzwiak (Tom Wilkinson) at Lacuna, Inc. and have her memory erased. Joel of course finds out about this, and decides he will show her. He chooses to erase his memory of Clementine. But what happens if he decides halfway through the procedure that he changed his mind? <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> The themes of Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind are, well, eternal. Love, loss, relationships, and the importance of memories are explored in heartbreaking detail in this film. Carrey gives his best performance here. He is subdued and relaxed, there is never a moment when the Jim Carrey that bends over and talks out his ass enters the scene. Kate Winslet is magical, as are all of the supporting performances by the likes of Kristin Dunst, Elijah Wood, David Cross, Jane Adams and Mark Ruffalo. While I do not consider it Kaufman’s best work, a Charlie Kaufman screenplay is the equivalent of Shakespeare. This is a film that is in good company. The best love story of the decade. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;21. The Departed&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;The Departed&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/780/TheDeparted.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> I love being in familiar territory. Watching The Departed is like putting on your favorite hooded sweatshirt. It is always comfortable, it is cozy, and fits just right. Martin Scorsese (the greatest living American director) returns to form in The Departed, but instead of cruising down the mean streets of New York City, so carefully examined in Scorsese classic’s Taxi Driver, Mean Streets and Goodfellas, we take on new city- Boston. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> The villain is Frank Costello (Jack Nicholson), a mob boss that doesn’t really pretend not to be a mob boss. The other villain is Colin Sullivan (Matt Damon), the member of the State Police on Costello’s payroll. Then there is Billy Costigan (Leonardo DiCaprio), the undercover cop that is forced to be a criminal. But wait! There’s more. You see, Costello is also sort of a cop too… but I am getting ahead of myself. The Departed is about the roles in which we give ourselves. There is a tagline on the poster. “Cops or Criminals. When you are facing a loaded gun, what’s the difference?” The tagline desribes the entire film. Each character is in a role that they don’t want to be in; their role is that of the rat, the informant- the most dishonorable role any person can ever posses, at least according to the mob. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Scorsese has not been this great in years. From the opening sequence, featuring the Rolling Stones “Gimmie Shelter” (a staple of Goodfellas, Casino, and his recent Stones documentary Shine a Light) we know that we are back in a place that will make us happy. We smile, put our feet up, and watch the movie in all of its Roman Catholic symbolism glory. When it comes to Catholic guilt, there is no one better than Scorsese. It seems fitting that the film ends the way it does. After all, who wants a rat in their home? <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> I would be a liar to say that I didn’t tear up a bit on Oscar night 2007, when The Departed won for both Best Picture and Director. Our greatest director has evaded the top prize for years. Seeing him with a statue brought a joy to my heart. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;20. Children of Men&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Children of Men&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/780/ChildrenofMen.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Alfonso Cuaron’s Children of Men is one of two great science fiction films of the decade (the other one is coming up). The opening scene, in which our hero Theo (Clive Owen) learns that the last child born on the planet has died before nearly escaping a terrorist bombing, is among the best pre-credit sequences of any film. The merits of that scene alone could have set the film up for failure (after all, if your opening scene is classic, where do you go from there?) but the film continues on like a train to hell, stopping to pick up passengers on the way. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> The picture is dark and relentless. This is a world without hope. Civilization is aware it is on the brink of extinction, and there is nothing they can do about it. London is one of the only habitable countries on Earth, war and destruction has destroyed most other countries- including the United States. Theo learns from his ex lover Julian (Julianne Moore) that there may be hope. Theo joins her and discovers Kee (Clare-Hope Ashitey) a young girl that just happens to be pregnant. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> From this realization onward the plot is more or less a MacGuffin intended to set up one sensational sequence after another. Cuaron has created an utterly realistic world- this could quite possibly be what ours would look like in the end times. Characters have no motivation but a quick death, and some even want the apocalypse to come for religious reasons. Using a variety of filmmaking techniques, Cuaron directs Children of Men almost like a war epic. Characters flee from gunfire in long tracking shots, without cuts. It is all there, all real on the screen. This is one of the most technically solid films ever made. If you are a fan of hard science-fiction, you must see this movie. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;19. 4 Months, 3 weeks, 2 days&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;4 Months, 3 weeks, 2 days&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/780/4Months3weeks2days.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> There are few performances better than that of Anamaria Marinca as Otilia in 4 months, 3 weeks, 2 days. Her performance is one of the most naturalistic I have ever seen. This is a great film about a harrowing subject- a black market abortion in communist Romania in the late 1980's. There is not a false note on any performances or the writing; every act in this film is within the scope of each character. This is not necessarily a film I want to revisit repeatedly due to the subject matter- but that does not mean it is not great. The Cannes Film Festival awarded 4 months, 3 weeks, 2 days with the prestigious Palm D'or. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Technically, the film is astounding. Entire sequences play on without the slightest cut. There is a dinner sequence in the middle of the film that lasts for nearly 20 minutes. Otilia has left her friend at a hotel. Her friend has just had an abortion by an evil man that also virtually raped both women out of coercision. Otilia is forced to leave her friend to meet her boyfriends parents. From the moment she sits down to the time she gets up from the dinner table, over fifteen minutes have passed. There are no cuts, it is all done in one take, with nearly 8 actors in the scene. This is not only masterful filmaking, but outstanding acting as well. The entire time the camera is focused on Marinca, as she twitches and ticks- knowing her friend may be dying. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> The political subtext of the picture is also profound. The film is not overtly political, but the subtext is. Abortion is illegal in the communist state, but so are many other things. We see glances of Otilia buying black market cigarettes, and she is forced to go into a field of study she has no interest in just to prevent herself from being forced to go to a work farm for women. In the end, this may be the one of the most feminist movies of all time. It shows the strengths, as well as the terror of independence. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;18. Inglourious Basterds&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Inglourious Basterds&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/780/InglouriousBasterds.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Inglourious Basterds, Quentin Tarantino’s best film since Pulp Fiction, takes place in an alternate reality. It changes American history by rewriting the ending to World War II. Some critics and viewers have been vocal about this, going as far as to call the film sacrilegious. I say that, unless a movie is a documentary, it is always a work of fiction. It ends on the screen. That being said, if the characters in Inglorious Basterds were real, the war very well may have ended the way it does in the film. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> This is bold, electrifying filmmaking. Tarantino has never made a bad picture, but here hey surpasses himself. There are sequences here that work on so many levels that entire film class lectures could be given about them. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Take for example, the opening sequence. A dairy farmer (Denis Menochet) is harboring Jews by hiding them under his floorboards. Col. Hans Landa (the magnificent Christoph Waltz) knows that they are there, but insists on conversing with the farmer anyway. They switch freely back and forth between English and French, and at two points the characters decide to light their respective pipes. The farmer has a corn-cob pipe, the colonel has a pipe that looks like the end of a mighty Nazi trumpet. It is in moments like this that we perk up and smile, knowing we are in a world that could only be crafted by Tarantino. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> The performances are all larger than life. Waltz’s Col. Landa is the best of the lot, but Brad Pitt and Melanie Laurent also shine. Pitt in particular, gives an incredibly skilled comedic performance as Lt. Aldo Raine, and his opening sequence is as beautiful as anything in Kubrick’s Full Metal Jacket. We love these characters, even the evil ones. We know Tarantino is having a good time- after all, we are. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;17. Donnie Darko&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Donnie Darko&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/780/DonnieDarko.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> There have been very few directorial debuts as ambitions as Richard Kelly’s Donnie Darko. The film is a wonderland of metaphysics, in which time traveling bunnies (at least, characters in bunny outfits) are harbingers of doom. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Donnie (Jake Gylenhaal) has emotional problems. He is struggling to fit in at school and resents being the middle child in the family. He seems to live in a nice home and his parents seem to love him very much, but Donnie is still angry and frightened for what’s to come. Things don’t get any better once he starts seeing Frank (James Duval), a six foot tall, creepy as hell bunny that tells him the world will end in 28 days, 6 hours, 42 minutes and 12 seconds. From this point on Donnie just doesn’t know what to do with himself. He draws inward, but Frank will just simply not stop showing him things. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> I will stop there. To spoil the pleasure of seeing Donnie Darko for the first time would be a sin. I will simply say that it is an experience that you need to stay awake through. I would advise you take some notes while watching with a friend. You will want to compare them when it is over. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;16. Mulholland Dr.&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Mulholland Dr.&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/780/MulhollandDr.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> To this day I still don't know what the hell David Lynch's Mulholland Dr. is about. I just know that it is mesmerizing. It is like a giant puzzle, I know that somewhere, somehow the pieces are supposed to go together, but for some reason I just can’t get them to fit. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> This is a discussion piece if there ever has been one. Different people come up with different theories about the film. The only thing I was able to figure out was that Betty (Naomi Watts) is actually Rita (Laura Elena Harring), and that once the box is opened everything begins to change. But was everything already altered from previous acts in the film? And, who in the hell was behind that dumpster? These questions are maddening. All I know is that Lynch is either purely genius or purely psychotic, either way he has made a hypnotic film. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> The DVD case gives some clues to uncovering the film’s mystery:<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Pay particular attention in the beginning of the film: At least two clues are revealed before the credits.<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Notice appearances of the red lampshade.<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Can you hear the title of the film that Adam Kesher is auditioning actresses for? Is it mentioned again?<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> An accident is a terrible event — notice the location of the accident.<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Who gives a key, and why?<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Notice the robe, the ashtray, the coffee cup.<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> What is felt, realized, and gathered at the Club Silencio?<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Did talent alone help Camilla?<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Note the occurrences surrounding the man behind Winkie's.<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Where is Aunt Ruth?<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Yeah. I still can’t figure it out. Who cares? This is one dizzying, magnificent movie. The entire film plays like a dream. I have seen it probably six times and each time I watch it I peel back a layer- like an onion. The world of the movie rests on the tortoise, get rid of one tortoise and there is another. It is just turtles, all the way down. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;15. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/780/HarryPotterandthePrisonerofAzkaban.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Prisoner of Azkaban is the best film to date in the Harry Potter franchise. This is the movie that best translates the essence of the fantastic novels by J.K. Rowling. Directed by the brilliant Alfonso Cauron (who actually has more films on this list than any other filmmaker) it is the most visually arresting experience in the franchise. Perhaps it is ironic that the best of the Harry Potter films is also the shortest. There were storylines that were cut out for this movie but the experience is not compromised. What is important about an adaptation is how it works on its own merit and not necessarily the faithfulness to the source material. The first two films were great children's movies, but a little too saccharine. The remaining movies (with possibly the exception of The Half-Blood Prince) have been too staccato in the storytelling, causing a rigid and uneven experience. Prisoner of Azkaban does not have these pitfalls; it is a wonderful entertainment from beginning to end. Sure, there are times the acting is not great (these are children, after all) but the world is there on the screen, and the emotional payoff of the climax (Harry and the Dementors) is one for the ages. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;14. Antichrist&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Antichrist&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/780/Antichrist.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> The most disturbing film I have ever seen, it will haunt you for days after seeing it. This film by Lars Von Trier is probably the most controversial movie on the list. It has acts of graphic violence and despair that are worse than anything seen in mainstream &quot;torture-porn.&quot; That being said, Antichrist is a masterpiece. The emotions, as raw as they are, are very real. The performances by William Dafoe and Charlotte Gainsbourg are both worthy of Oscar recognition, though they will not receive it. You will never look at a fox the same way again. Von Trier has created a truly unique piece, and inverted world- and the results are unimaginable. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;13. The Squid and the Whale&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;The Squid and the Whale&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/780/TheSquidandtheWhale.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> The Squid and the Whale is one of the best movies I have ever seen about divorce, particularly the effect that divorce has on children. This small film, less than 100 minutes long and shot on a shoestring budget, has given me more to think about regarding the family dynamic that any other film in years. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> The film tells the story of the Berkman family. Bernard (Jeff Bridges) and Joan (Laura Linney), the father and mother, are both New York intellectuals. She writes for the New Yorker and is getting ready to be published, while he was a successful writer for many years but has recently become a washed out Junior College creative writing professor. She is cold and uncompromising, he is an arrogant ass. These are two people that do not need to be married. When they sit down their children Walt (Jesee Eisenberg) and Frank (Owen Kline, the son of Kevin Kline and Phoebe Cates) both children immediately begin to take sides. Frank sides with Mommy, Walt with Daddy. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> There are the obvious dramas about murder, torture, disease, famine and war, and there are the true dramas, the realistic ones. All 4 members of the Berkman family are realistic people with realistic problems. Bernard loves his wife but is too arrogant to admit it. He is so caught up on himself, and even goes about giving his son horrible advice, going as far as telling him to have sex with his new girlfriend before dumping her, for practice. Joan has not always been faithful to Bernard, but loves him too much to let him go. Both children are terribly screwed up, yet we sense that they will grow up and do great things. In all actuality – they did. The film is written and directed by Noah Baumbach, based on some personal experiences he has. How much do you want to bet that Frank and Walt end up writing a movie someday? Who knows- it may be as good as The Squid and the Whale. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;12. There Will Be Blood&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;There Will Be Blood&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/780/ThereWillBeBlood.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Daniel Day Lewis gives one of the most powerful performances in the history of film as Daniel Plainview in There Will Be Blood. It will only be surpassed by one other performance this decade. This performance alone cements There Will Be Blood as one of the great movies. Most magical is that this film has so much more going for it than just Day Lewis. The story is told such an elegant, straight-forward way that it is as if we are watching a documentary unfold. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> There have been many critics that have claimed that this film is a character study, however I feel that it is also one of the best epics of the decade. The oil derrick fire is on par with the fire in Gone with the Wind, and the rugged landscape of California creates a setting as majestic as any in a Sergio Leone picture. Paul Dano is superb as both Paul and Eli Sunday. The ending of the film is unforgettable; I will never look at bowling the same way again. This could have easily been in the top ten in any other decade.<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;11. Minority Report&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Minority Report&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/780/MinorityReport.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Minority Report, the best science fiction film since Blade Runner, is the best work that Steven Spielberg has done this decade. It is based on a Phillip K. Dick(Blade Runner, Total Recall) story, and is an outstanding combination of science fiction and film noir. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> The story stars Tom Cruise as John Anderton, one of the head officers in the future Washington D.C.’s elite Precrime unit. Using a group of psychic children (Precogs) the police have developed a way of preventing and prosecuting crime before it occurs. Even think about killing your wife, and within minutes a SWAT team will be at your door, placing a halo around your head, and sending you to prison. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> The system is flawless. Since its inception Washington D.C. has not had a single homicide. The opening sequence of the film shows the entire Precrime process. As a man that is about to kill his wife and her lover is escorted away, he cries and screams- “I didn’t do anything.” The moral and constitutional implications of such a system clearly escape the government as well as Anderton. That is, until Anderton sees that he is slated to commit murder in roughly 24 hours. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> From this realization on, Minority Report becomes a nonstop action picture. Anderton must flee from his own police force with retnal scanners and identity tracers everywhere. In order to get to bottom of the murder (which must be a setup) he is required to use all of the ingenuity he can find. The result is Spielberg’s most electrifying work, with special effects seamlessly blending into this detective story. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> I love this movie. There are moments of excitement, such as the thrilling sequence in which robotic “spiders” search an entire city block looking for Anderton; or, the fantastic sequence towards the end of the movie with John and Agatha (Samantha Morton- one of the Precogs) evade escape through a futuristic shopping mall to the tune of Andy Williams’s Moon River. There are many twists, turns, revelations and surprises; there is never a dull moment, nor should there be- after all we are in Spielberg’s hands. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;10. Synecdoche, New York&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Synecdoche, New York&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/780/SynecdocheNewYork.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;a href = 'http://www.filmnet.com/reviews/synecdoche_new_york_by_shaunhenisey/'&gt;Click here&lt;/a&gt; to read Shaun Henisey's review of Synecdoche, New York. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;9. Pan's Labyrinth&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Pan's Labyrinth&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/780/PansLabyrinth.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Pan's Labyrinth is one of the most beautiful films I have ever seen. From its gothic and bizarre creatures, to the bleak realism of life during the Spanish Civil War, the film never misses a beat. The production design, sets, costumes and make up are all like something you have never seen before. These factors alone would make Pan's Labyrinth one of the best movies of the decade. What transcends the film from good to great is the story that goes with the images. The plot is as simple as a fairytale, but intertwined with the realities of war.<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Guillermo Del Toro, the director, has created a world in which fantasy and reality collide. Del Toro never explains anything. We are unsure if we are watching a pure fantasy picture, in which the supernatural elements are actually happening, or if it all takes place in the child's mind. Both are adequate interpretations of the film. Del Toro leaves it all open for us. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> This is not a film for children- this is an adult's fairy tale. Some of the images in the dreamscapes, in particular the Pale Man, are horrifying and beautiful at the same time. This is an older form of fairy tale- one that Lewis Carroll or The Brothers Grimm could have created. The juxtaposition of the fairy tale and the elements of war is also fantastic. Lopez plays Vidal as one sick and cruel bastard. He kills indiscriminately and is the very definition of an abusive parental figure. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Del Toro has made one of the most artistic films of the decade. The fact that he wrote, directed, and designed many of the creatures himself makes him a true auteur. The boldness of mixing two genre's as completely opposite as a war film and a fairy tale could have resulted in one of the most uneven and ridiculous motion pictures ever. Instead it succeeds on every level. This is most unique and moving viewing experiences of my life; a masterpiece of world cinema.<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;8. Almost Famous&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Almost Famous&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/780/AlmostFamous.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &quot;Here is a movie that makes me unconditionally happy. Watching it puts a huge smile on my face and a swell in my throat. &quot;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;a href = 'http://www.filmnet.com/reviews/almost_famous_by_shaun_henisey/'&gt;Click here&lt;/a&gt; to read Shaun Henisey's review for Almost Famous - right here at FilmNet.. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;7. Adaptation.&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Adaptation&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/780/Adaptation.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Adaptation boasts the best screenplay of the decade, one of the greatest of all time. It tells the story of screenwriter Charlie Kaufman (a real person), Susan Orlean (a real person), John LaRoche (a real person) and Donald Kaufman (not a real person). I can only imagine the look on the studio execs faces when they read this screenplay. This is my personal favorite film on the list. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Kaufman was asked to adapt the book &quot;The Orchid Thief&quot; by Orlean, a writer for the New Yorker. The book is comprised of &quot;that sprawling, New Yorker Shit&quot; and Kaufman developed writers block in the adaptation. He ended up writing himself into the screenplay, creating a fictional brother for himself, and fabricating an entire third act of nothing but fiction. The movie is the story of the adaptation, which is about our ability to adapt. I don't know if you can get much more Meta than this. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> What a work of stunning originality! Charlie Kaufman is the single most important screenwriter of the decade. His work has the complexity of great literature. He is clearly interested in the inter-workings of the human mind and the dynamic of human relationships; he is a true unique voice, and Adaptation is his best work. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> The credit to the film does not only go to Kaufman, the film was also directed by Spike Jonze. Jonze is a prodigy himself, only directing 3 films in the last 10 years- Being John Malkovich, Adaptation, and Where the wild Things Are. You need to only look at where these films are on my list to know what I think about them. He is a bold, gifted filmmaker, one with as unique of a voice as Kaufman's. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> The acting is also amazing. Meryl Streep, a National Treasure in her own right, gives one of her best performances here. She conveys the inner sadness of Orlean in her eyes and her actions. There is moment late in the film where Orlean is high and holding a phone up to her ear, trying to mimic a dial-tone, that is nothing short of spot on perfect. Chris Cooper won an Academy Award for his portrayal of John LaRoche, a backwoods hillbilly with moments of almost Zen like knowledge. His range in this film is astounding, going from the outright comical to the emotionally devastating. One only needs to watch the scene where he tells about losing his home and his wife, or the beautiful ride in the van- where he tells Orlean about the difficulty of adaptation. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> There are many people that dislike (even loathe) Nicholas Cage. I don't. He has certainly made some horrible career choices, but when he is on (and not doing a film for a paycheck) there are few actors that are better. Look at the way he plays both Charlie and Donald Kaufman. They are the same person, sometimes even wearing the same clothes- yet you can always tell them apart. They are two entirely different performances at all times on the screen. Cage could have won a second Oscar here- he is the glue that holds the film together. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> I could go on for hours about what I love about this movie. There are moments of sheer brilliance. The twists are outrageous, and the movie takes us places we would never imagine. It is a crazy, crazy, film- and what a marvelous thing that is.<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;6. Wall-E (and all those other Pixar movies...)&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Wall-E&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/780/WallE.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> I had to combine all six Pixar films released this decade under this one heading, out of fairness. Each one of them could individually be on this list; this is just not fair to the other films. No other movie studio has had this history of complete and total commercial success along with profound artistic quality. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Just look at the names: Monsters Inc., Finding Nemo, The Incredibles, Ratatouille, Wall-E, and Up. Every single one of these pictures is a modern masterpiece. These are not just children's films- they are films that embody the spirit and warmth of the most important human values. From The Incredibles depiction of the family unit, to Ratatouille’s analysis of cynical criticism, to Up's proclamation that life’s great adventure is the one right in front of your face; these movies are all modern classics. Walt Disney would jump in delight if he were able to see these pictures. We are extremely fortunate to live in this time. The 1940's and 1950's had only one Walt Disney- we have three: John Lassetter (Toy Story, CEO of Pixar), Andrew Stanton (Wall-E, Finding Nemo) and Brad Bird (The Incredibles, Ratatouille). These three individuals are on the cutting edge of American film- creating an entirely new genre of film- the Pixar genre. This is not traditional animation, but event viewing. When a new Pixar film comes out everyone wants to see it: adults, children, and the elderly alike. The depth and scope of quality here is unparalleled. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> The best of the lot is Wall-E. This is, quite simply put, a magical motion picture. For starters, the animation is the best I have ever seen. There are parts of this movie, specifically the parts on the planet Earth that are incredible and photorealistic. Other sequences involving Wall-E and E.V.E dancing in space are majestic and beautiful. I remember seeing Wall-E at a matinee on opening weekend. The theater was packed; people were even sitting in the aisles. There were dozens of children in the audience, many of them very small toddlers. When this sequence came on there was not a cry or sound in the house. Everyone was engaged. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> The more I think about, the more I realize how special of a picture Wall-E really is. It shouldn't work. It is about a robot that cannot even speak. The entire first 40 minutes of the movie is the equivalent of a silent picture. When humans are introduced, they are fat, lazy and pretty unlikable. This is a pretty harsh critique of the American lifestyle, yet people are not worried, or offended, when they see Wall-E. They see it as the wonderful story that it is, and leave with the message. In the end, Wall-E is the same thing most great science fiction is, a cautionary tale against pollution, excess, laziness and consumerism. Wall-E risks his life for the plant of life inside of him- we can learn so much from this little robot. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;5. Where the Wild Things Are&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Where the Wild Things Are&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/780/WheretheWildThingsAre.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Never in my life have I related to a movie more than when viewing Where the Wild Things Are for the first time. In his film, Spike Jonze has captured the essence of what it means to be a child. Growing up as an only child in a single parent household had a profound effect on me, and seeing this movie made me relate to the feelings I had in my youth, along with the feelings of countless others. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Based on Maurice Sendak's classic book, Where the Wild Things Are gets to the heart of not only the stories content, but its subtext. This is a work not to be taken literally. The symbolism and meaning of the picture can only be felt though the eyes of a child, or at least those that can remember what those eyes feel like. Max (Max Records) is probably the most realistic child I have ever seen on the screen. He is not all about sitting there and looking cute while making comments that no child would make. He is a real kid- rebellious, wild, out of control, desperately seeking attention, more than anything wanting to be loved. His sister has outgrown him, and his mother (Catherine Keener) is too busy either working or snuggling up to her new boyfriend. In a fit or rage Max decides he does not need his mother anymore- and he goes to the place where the wild things are. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> The Wild Things are technically amazing. Created by Jim Henson's creature shop, they are large costumes with adult actors in them. The only CGI is used on the Wild Thing's faces. This is the kind of movie that could have easily been done in an animated format, or with fully CGI characters. Jonze is wise in rejecting these concepts. He makes the Wild Things have a certain depth and realism. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> The voice acting work is superb. James Gandolfini is the best as Carol, the voice of the head Wild Thing; or the voice of Max's raw emotion, if you'd like. Lauren Ambrose, Catherine O' Hara, Forrest Whitaker, Paul Dano and Chris Cooper also do exceptional jobs. Each Wild Thing is an individual aspect of Max's Id. They all represent his emotions, and being a child, those emotions have a tendency to contradict each other. The soundtrack from Karen O (of the Yeah Yeah Yeah’s) is sublime and beautiful. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> I have heard from parents that Where the Wild Things Are is too adult for children. Some have even called the movie depressing. I took my eight year old daughter to see the movie, and she understood every bit of it. She said it was sad- but that it was also very good. I fear that we live in a world where we may be trying to hide too much from our children. Where the Wild Things Are is a spiritual and emotional experience. It is cathartic- and you know what? Kids can handle that. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> This is a film that belongs on the shelf right next to movies like The 400 Blows, Stand by Me, and E.T. If there is one thing I am certain of it is that Where the Wild Things Are will be considered a classic for years to come. It will cement itself in history as a true work of art.<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;4. The Dark Knight&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;The Dark Knight&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/780/TheDarkKnight.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> A detective chases a psychopathic serial killer through the streets of Chicago. The serial killer will stop at nothing to cause as much chaos and damage as possible. The killer does not fear death. The detective bends many laws to apprehend the killer and, in doing so, looks into the heart of darkness itself. This could be the subplot of any great thriller, either in the medium of film and literature- the story of The Dark Knight, one of the finest films ever made, and certainly the greatest movie ever made based on a comic book. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> I use the phrase comic book lightly. The Dark Knight, at its very essence, is a police drama. Many have compared it to Michael Mann's Heat, and they are right on target. The serial killer just happens to be the Joker and the detective Batman. Batman is, of course, not a super-hero (he has no powers) so it is easy to relate to his struggle with evil in the world. He is the most complex of heroes; the character is worthy of high literature. The joker is the ideal villian, archetypical to a fault- an agent of chaos. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> In his film, Christopher Nolan has created a crime thriller with spectacular set pieces and blockbuster production values with the realism of a character drama between (for the most part) two people- the protagonist, Batman (Christian Bale), and the antagonist, Joker (Heath Ledger). It is the most simple of formulas, and it works brilliantly. The special effects are there- but they are all practical. The story is not necessarily epic, but intimate. This is the power of substance over style. You don't have to believe me. Just ask any of the people that made this picture the second largest grossing film of all time. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> The film is ranked so high on this list for one reason: Heath Ledger. As the Joker, Ledger gives the single greatest performance of the decade. His character is immediately recognizable to nearly everyone only a year after the film's release. His performance elevates every single scene, and when he is not on the screen we feel his presence. Ledger earned the first posthumous Oscar for his role, and I have little doubt in my mind that this could have been a unanimous decision. The Dark Knight was robbed of several other awards this year as well, including best picture. I guarantee you that if this picture was simply about cops and criminals- sans make up and costumes, The Dark Knight would have won best picture. Instead, it will have to simply reside on hundreds of lists such as this- near the very top.<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;3. No Country for Old Men&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;No Country for Old Men&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/780/NoCountryforOldMen.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> With No Country for Old Men, the Coen Brothers created a perfect film. Every performance hits its mark. The Texas setting and time frame gives the film a sense of timelessness, and the characters are detailed with fine detail. The three leads, James Brolin, Tommy Lee Jones and Javier Bardem embody their characters so well that we completely forget that they are all relatively recognizable actors. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> There has never been a better examination of violence on the silver screen than in No Country for Old Men. It is truly to the credit of the author of the novel, Cormac McCarthy (possibly the greatest living literary mind today) and the Coen Brothers that this labyrinth work fell together so evenly on the screen. In the story of Anton Chigurh and his mass killing spree to recover some drug money, McCarthy and the Coen’s have crafted a tale that can represent all violence in the world, both currently and in history. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Many have claimed to not understand the meaning of the film. &quot;The hero died!&quot; A friend told me, while discussing the film. &quot;The lunatic just killed everyone off&quot; she said. I replied with a simple, &quot;Yes.&quot; The message of the film, though cryptic to some, resonates with me the most. There are no clean getaways; violence begets violence-it has always been this way. Things begin to look better- and then we wake up.<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;2. City of God&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;City of God&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/780/CityofGod.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> The Cidade de Deus (City of God) is a section in the heart of the slums of Rio De Janeiro, and the film City of God presents the most harrowing depiction of life in a third world country I have ever seen. This may be one of the most dangerous places alive. Rival gangs wage war with each other- killing innocents, women and children alike. The majority of the time it is the children doing the shooting. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> City of God, one of the most energetic motion pictures I have ever seen, was expertly directed by the Brazilian director Fernando Meirelles (The Constant Gardner, Blindness) who is channeling the raw energy of the best Martin Scorsese films here. It has been said that City of God is basically Goodfellas as a foreign film- this analysis is both spot on and horribly off base. This film certainly packs the raw filmmaking energy and skill of Goodfellas, but the emotional payoff here is much more unnerving. There is no resolution, only continued violence and bloodshed. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> I have never seen a character so deliberately amoral as Lil Ze (Douglas Siva as a child, Leandro Firmino as an adult). He thrives on bloodlust, carnage and power. At the beginning of the film the hero, Rocket (Alexandre Rodrigues) is a young boy that makes the wise choice of steering clear from Lil Ze (then known as Lil Dice). This is a wise decision. Ze is a psychopath from a very early age. When Ze and some friends rob a hotel, he goes back and kills every single person staying there. He is roughly eight or nine years old and has already killed dozens of people. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> The story is not just about bloodshed, but about doing the right thing. In the City of God this can be tricky. Rocket is a photographer for the local newspaper, a job he earned based on a mixture of luck and skill. Should he print pictures showing the face of Lil Ze? What about the corrupt police officials that he catches on film extorting and buying drugs? It is a decision he makes daily living in this world. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> I would be remiss if I did not mention The Runts. The Runts are the small children that inhabit the gang world of City of God- the majority of them are no more than 6. We see them killed, ran over, and kill others. They beat characters to death. In the City of God there is only one way to succeed- murder. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> This is an astonishing film. The subject matter, while extremely dark, is carried with jubilance by Merielles. There are moments of almost Dickensien in his quest to live and survive as a child in the darkest place on earth. His hopes and dreams, to be a successful photographer and get the girl, can be applied universally. We care about the character and want him to escape his world. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> This film is yet another example of how some of the best filmmaking in the world is south of our border. City of God is a masterpiece. It is a movie that should be seen by everyone, in every culture. It is the kind of movie that makes you empathize with others, and thankful for what you have. In order to realize how great we have it, sometimes we need a wake up call. The movie’s ending tells a simple truth- the City of God is all violent places. The guns are never put down, they just change hands. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;1. The Lord of the Rings&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;The Lord of the Rings&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/780/TheLordoftheRings.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> The Lord of the Rings is the cinematic experience of the decade. For three years in a row the world was captivated by the timeless tale of Frodo and his trip to Mount Doom to destroy the one ring. Beginning with The Fellowship of the Ring in 2001, Peter Jackson's trilogy soon became (and remains) the gold standard for Hollywood Epics. The three films combined were nominated for a total 30 Academy Awards, winning 17. Every single installment of the trilogy (The Fellowship of the Ring, The Two Towers, The Return of the King) was nominated for Best Picture, with The Return of the King finally winning the prize in 2003; For the first time in history the Academy Awards had a clean sweep- a film that won every single award in which it was nominated. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> It would have been easy to be pretentious about this list. Certainly there are more obscure titles that I could have put in the Number 1 spot. This would have been a down and out lie. Massive popularity does not mean that this film is anything short of a masterpiece. The Lord of the Rings represents the pinnacle of the American Epic. David Lean (director of Lawrence of Arabia) would probably declare these pictures the greatest of all time. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Jackson accomplished the impossible by making possibly the most faithful adaptation of a major literary work ever. While there are some scenes missing (albeit, fewer in the exceptional Extended Editions) all of the world created by J.R.R Tolkien is there on the screen. The characters are all fully developed and all of the spectacular special effects are done in the interest of the story. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Many images come across my mind when I think about The Lord of the Rings. I imagine a boy reaching up and grabbing a tiny ring as it falls to his fingers. I think about a wizard, yelling at a demon at the top of a bottomless pit. I envision great battles, beautiful scenery, dragons, demons, Gollum’s, volcanoes and walking trees. I see elephantine creatures lumbering through a field, killing all in their path. I imagine giant spiders, all-seeing eyes, hobbits, dwarfs, princesses, elf’s, kings, and foul monsters. I hear the great score by Howard Shore and realize the majesty of the scenery. There is simply nothing like it. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> I know that there are some that have never seen these films. Many reject the movies simply on the basis that they are fantasy. Perhaps you think they are too long. My advice would be that a great movie is never too long, they are always just right. The series is not perfect, but it does not need to be. It is what it is, and that is the gold standard of filmmaking. Like Star Wars, Raiders of the Lost Ark, E.T and The Wizard of Oz, The Lord of the Rings is an instant classic- instantly identifiable to even those that have never seen it. It is a film that over time will undoubtedly be engrained in American culture. This is the kind of experience that people want to celebrate annually. The sense of wonder had left the movies for many years, and The Lord of the Rings brought it back.'
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title => 'The 40 Year Old Virgin'
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short-body => 'Shaun Henisey picks the Top 25 films of the decade. To view his other picks, click here. 25. The 40 Year-Old Virgin It many ways I suppose The 40 Year-Old Virgin is the birth of the bromantic comedy. There have been numerous rip off's of this formula (vulgar with a heart) over the last several years, but there are none that exhibit the spirit and ...'
teaser => 'It many ways I suppose The 40 Year-Old Virgin is the birth of the bromantic comedy.'
title => 'Best Movies of the Decade Part 1'
type-id => 6
7 =>
__attr__id => 779
__domel__body => '&lt;b&gt;50. A.I. Artificial Intelligence&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Few films have been as misunderstood as Stephen Spielberg's A.I. - Artificial Intelligence. Originally intended to be a Stanley Kubrick production, when Spielberg announced that he was taking over the project after Kubrick's death, the media and critical community were skeptical at best. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> I remember viewing the movie at the State Theater in Ann Arbor, Michigan on opening day with a crowd of students. After the movie was over, immediate reactions ranged from ecstatic praise to flat out anger. As the years have progressed, I have seen the film on both lists defining the greatest and worst films of all time. Honestly, for a while I wasn't even sure where I stood on the piece of work. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Now, nearly ten years later, I look back on A.I. as one of the great flawed masterpieces of cinema. It does not always work. Some of the acting is not necessarily where it needs to be, and there are times when the special effects are dodgy. That being said- the vision, themes, and implications explored in this picture are among the most deeply philosophical I have seen in a Hollywood production. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Much has been said about the ending of A.I. It is certainly open to interpretation , as Kubrick would have intended. I will say that anyone that thinks this film has a happy ending is sadly incorrect. The fact that this movie still cements such discussion is a testament to its place in the history of the movies.<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;49. Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgandy&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgandy&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/779/Anchorman.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Will Ferrell is the most absurd of modern comedians. He is hilarious, and has never been funnier than in Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy. This movie is utterly ridiculous. There is no plot, the camera just rolls on while Ferrell and the gang go about their misadventures. There are sequences in this film that are so idiotic I laugh until I cry. Seeing Ron Burgundy talk to his dog, Baxter is one. Seeing the news team sing a beautiful rendition of Afternoon Delight is another. Then there is the wonderful sequence in which Brick (Steve Carell) kills a man with a Trident. This is one film my friends and I routinely quote dialogue from. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> This is a movie that exists for no purpose other than to make us laugh, and in that it is wildly successful. There are no profound moments of realization here and the movie does not have the emotional resonance of some of the other great comedies of this decade- but this doesn't matter. This movie is simply funny as hell. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;48. Bowling for Columbine&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Bowling for Columbine&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/779/BowlingforColumbine.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Michael Moore is at his best when he stands back from a situation and begins to ask questions. I think the most profound question he has asked in any of his pictures is in Bowling for Columbine, his examination on the obsession with guns and violence in America. There is a bank that is offering a free gun whenever anyone opens an account. Moore looks at the teller and asks- &quot;Don't you think its a little dangerous handing out guns in a bank?&quot; It is ironic how sometimes the most simple questions can be the most profound. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Moore has made a career for himself being a rabble rouser, generally with justifiable causes. There are times that he comes across as too brash though, and some of his stuff is simply outrageous propaganda. For the most part, Bowling for Columbine steers clear of this fault. His interview with Terry Nichols brother and Charlton Heston are the highlights of the film. More than anything, Bowling for Columbine makes us think about the state of the American psyche.<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;47. Elephant&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Elephant&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/779/Elephant.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Another film about school violence, this one a work of fiction. Gus Van Sant's brilliant Elephant tells the story of a day in a life of students at a suburban high school. The style of the film is technically outstanding, using long tracking and steadicam shots to literally follow the students as they roam the halls, interact with each other, attend class, and plan to kill other students. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Elephant is an exceptional picture because it does not offer cookie cutter explanations; it is only a portrait of sadness and grief. It is alarming to think about the number of students that live these lifestyles. We feel for them, and at the end of the film we may not understand the actions of the characters but we understand they are a product of their environment. Much deserved winner of the 2003 Cannes Film Festival Palm Do'r.<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;46. Iron Man&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Iron Man&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/779/IronMan.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Iron Man is a purely entertaining film experience from start to finish. It works so well primarily based on the brave choice of allowing Robert Downey Jr. to play Tony Stark. In his portrayal of Stark, Downey Jr. created a character that was so completely realized and special that we would watch him even if he wasn't in the latest superhero tent-pole attraction. As spectacular as some of the sequences are, I distinctly remember being more entertained when Iron Man wasn't on the screen. There has never been an alter ego that has been more interesting than its super hero counterpart in the history of these types of movies- this is what made Iron Man the comic-book movie for people that didn't like comic book movies. And yes, I enjoyed watching Downey Jr. be reborn along with Stark. We have a sense that both characters, the living and the fictional, have had a insane life. Tony Stark grows up and takes responsibility along with Downey Jr., and transforms into something magical.<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;45. Spirited Away&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Spirited Away&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/779/SpiritedAway.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> I dislike Anime. I watched Spirited Away many years ago after it won the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature over more noteworthy nominees. I was pleasantly surprised that Spirited Away was extremely accessible, beautiful and moving. The voice work in the American Version is done quite well, and the story has the Eastern way of taking an emotionally complex and moving story and making it simple and universal. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Directed by Hayao Miyazaki, with the majority of the animation being done by his own hand, the film is at the top of its craft. The animation may be some of the most beautiful I have ever seen. There is something about 2D work that will always be more powerful to me than CGI; I appreciate each frame being hand-drawn, these works are a labor of love. I believe that this is the kind of picture that Akira Kurosawa could have easily directed- a wonderful film.<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;44. Spider-Man 2&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Spider-Man 2&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/779/SpiderMan2.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> If Iron Man is entertaining because of the performance of Robert Downey Jr. then Spider-Man 2 is entertaining due to the wonderful performance of Spider-Man. We know that there is no possible way that Toby Maguire can be in that suit, jumping from rooftop to rooftop. Certainly half of the time we are watching Spiderman we are watching CGI animation, yet we don't care. I was a fan of the comics as a child, and watching one of my old heroes fight Dr. Octopus on the side of a skyscraper nearly brought tears to my eyes. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> The original Spider-Man was too campy (the Green Goblin costume was completely absurd) and Spiderman 3 had just too much going on and contained one of the lamest sequences in the history of film- the Emo Dance Sequence. Spiderman 2 is the one that got it right. This is how it should be, with one villain fighting Spider-Man, and Peter Parker longing after Mary Jane, struggling with his decision to take responsibility over his powers. The special effects are amazing, and more than anything there is something grand about watching Spidey jump from rooftop to rooftop, laughing to the heavens. This is the best superhero movie ever made.<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;43. Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/779/CrouchingTigerHiddenDragon.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> A picture of utter majesty. I can honestly say that I do not always understand what is going on in Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. The story is the equivalent of a Chinese fairy tale, and there is a princess, and yada, yada, yada. This is a film to be seen not heard. The martial arts sequences are masterful. Watching two characters swordfight high up in the swaying trees of a forest and doing super-human acts of Kung Fu are simply amazing. Brilliantly directed by Ang Lee and choreographed by Yuen Wo-Ping, we watch characters defy gravity and realize that we are not watching CGI, but outstanding wire work. The actors are doing these things, they just have a little help. Per Lee, the only CGI used was to remove the wires from the actors. These are not stuntmen and women, but actors so physically in line with their outstanding skills they defy our conceptions of what the human body is possible of. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;42. United 93&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;United 93&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/779/United93.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> The concept is simple. A group of men board an airplane and take it over. The passengers are frightened. Air traffic control loses contact with the plane and begins to notice its route beginning to change- they can sense something is going on. The group of men on the plane are deranged and capable of unspeakable evil. The passengers on board the plane realize that they are going to have to stand up for themselves- they do. The plane crashes, and everyone dies. Well, not everyone. You see, the plane is United flight 93, and the date is September, 11th- the target being either the White House or the U.S. Capitol. This is a story of a group of people determining to take control over an uncontrollable situation. Expertly directed with restraint by Paul Greengrass (The Bourne Ultimatum) United 93 never pauses for sentiment. There are no lingering shots of the Trade center, no easy shots to the tear ducts. It tells the story of a specific place and time, as if it doesn't realize it is telling a story from the most horrible day in American history.<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;41. Lost in Translation&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Lost in Translation&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/779/LostinTranslation.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> I have never seen a better movie about loneliness than Lost in Translation. Charlotte (Scarlett Johansson) and Bob (Bill Murray) are two lost souls struggling with their lives on separate business trips in Japan. They meet at a hotel bar and become friends. They talk deep into the night and we sense that there is a connection between them <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Here is a film that is not afraid to force you to think about the emotions of the characters. Charlotte, who is in her mid twenties, is trying to experience her own life and become independent as well as loved. Instead, she is dragged around the globe with her photographer husband (Giovanni Ribisi). Bob has been married for many years and is a successful film actor. He hates the monotony of his life, his marriage, even his children. These are two characters on spiritual poles; one wants to live her life, while the other is tired of living. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> What these two characters share in this movie is special, and we are glad to be apart of it. It is as if we are observing “What happened in Paris” from Casablanca. I think I most like the film for Sophia Coppola’s wise choice not to have the characters sleep together. It would have ruined the movie. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Above all else is the ending. The trip is over, and both Bob and Charlotte are on their way back to their lives. Bob finds Charlotte walking down the street, stops her, and whispers something in her ear. We aren’t allowed to listen. A tear falls out of Charlottes eye as the movie ends. This moment alone earned Coppola her Oscar for Best Original Screenplay. We aren’t supposed to hear what is said, only wonder. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;40. The Royal Tenenbaums&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;The Royal Tenenbaums&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/779/TheRoyalTenenbaums.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Wes Anderson's masterpiece. This is without a doubt one of the most eccentric movies I have ever seen. Anderson's vision is always unique and the skill he puts into his ensemble pictures is considerable, yet few of his films have the heart of The Royal Tenenbaums. We begin the film bewildered and intimidated by the cast of characters. By the end we care about all of them individually. This movie is both funny and heartbreaking. The soundtrack, specifically the Mark Mothersbaugh work, is classic. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;39. Letters from Iwo Jima&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Letters from Iwo Jima&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/779/LettersfromIwoJima.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Letters from Iwo Jima may be the most truthful war picture. The men in the trenches are there not for political reasons, or even love for their country, but due to a sense of honor. All of the solders know that they are going to die and that their deaths will probably not be quick and immediate, but slow and painful. They stand their ground for the purposes of duty, and nothing more. We hear their thoughts through narration of letters home and we realize the utter futility of war. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> I don't necessarily believe that this is Clint Eastwood's finest film, but it is certainly his best directorial work. The idea of creating an American film documenting the Japanese side of the war is nothing short of a stroke of brilliance. This picture came out with a companion, Flags of Our Fathers the same year, but Letters from Iwo Jima has more resonance today. In knowing that our enemies are just like us we learn a greater sense of humanity. This is a beautiful picture.<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;38. In Bruges&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;In Bruges&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/779/InBruges.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> A hidden gem. American audiences did not take to In Bruges the way that some international audiences did, and it is a shame- this is a fantastic motion picture. Colin Farell and Brendan Gleeson are outstanding as two hitmen being exiled to Bruges (its in Belgium) after a hit gone wrong. This film is a stunning work of art with exceptional range. We are laughing like crazy one minute, and then shocked with an act of violence or an emotional climax the next. This is the kind of movie that really does defy genre. The movie is dark, but the humor is superb as are the performances. I love the way the film leaves the villain out until the last third of the story, and when Ralph Fiennes does take the screen, all we do is smile. If you have not seen this you owe it to yourself, it is certainly a favorite of mine. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;37. The Lives of Others&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;The Lives of Others&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/779/TheLivesofOthers.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> This is perhaps the most effective horror movie I have ever seen, if only it were a horror movie. The Lives of Others tells the story of Gerd Wiesler (Ulrich Muhe), a surveillance and interrogation expert in the communist regime of East Germany before the fall of the Berlin Wall. The opening sequence, in which Wielser is shown interrogating a suspect intercut with teaching a class on the methods of interrogation, is one of the most is cold in its exactness. The reaches of the communist regime was endless, and as we see in the film- abuse of power was common. While the world of George Orwell's 1984 did not necessarily realize itself in America, based on The Lives of Others, it was alive and well in communist Europe. This is an exceptional thriller, with moments of extreme tension. I particularly like Wiesler's inner struggle when he realizes that the work he is doing for the state is not necessarily ethical.<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;36. Slumdog Millionaire&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Slumdog Millionaire&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/779/SlumdogMillionaire.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Here is the feel-good movie of the list. Slumdog Millionaire is such a glorious and eclectic experience. The movie has it all: action, comedy, romance, drama, even a Bollywood dance number. Danny Boyle has taken what could have been a depressing and relentless look at the Ghetto and turned it into a mixture of Oliver Twist and Rocky. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> There are scenes here ranging from true horror (the “orphanage” sequences) to delight (the sequences at the Taj Mahal). The film moves along at a breakneck pace, telling story after story within the brilliant framing mechanism of an episode of Who wants to be a Millionaire. The characters of Jamal, Salem and Latika are all fully realized and it is sheer joy to watch the characters grow from children to young adults. The movie, above all else, is about the significance of our life experiences and the importance of our choices. Every choice each character makes in the film is based on what they know, or who they love.<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Reports from premieres at film festivals around the world were that audiences verbally cheered at certain moments. I am not surprised. This is a magical movie. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;35. Man on Wire&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Man on Wire&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/779/ManonWire.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> When I was seven years old my mother took me on a trip to New York. I have forgotten most of the vacation, but I distinctly remember visiting the World Trade Center. I remember looking out the windows on the observation deck at the beautiful city, and I recall standing on the roof. Little did I know that a little over ten years prior Phillippe Petit also stood on the same roof- and walked on a high wire across a 1350 foot pitfall. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Man on Wire is one of the great documentaries. It is in a class by itself. There is never a moment that is not engaging. From the very beginning when we see the construction of the World Trade Center until the end we are in a constant state of interest. Petit is quite a character and many of the things he says and does are profound. Parts of the movie work almost like a thriller or heist film, other parts pure drama. I remember three things most vividly about the film. I remember Petit recalling how he saw an image of the World Trade Center in a picture and immediately drew a line between the towers. Later, Petit justifies risking his life by saying that failure to walk the line would be a failure to live, and if he died it would be a glorious death. Finally at the end of the film, when Petit and others talk about him crossing the void 8 times there are tears on their chin- as if they were apart of something special. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Fittingly, there are no talks about September 11th in the film, even though it was released in 2008. This is a story about strength, hope, and the willpower to do something great- not evil. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;34. Chop Shop&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Chop Shop&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/779/ChopShop.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Chop Shop is a movie that took me by surprise. I watched it for the first time off of a critics recommendation, but did so some time after reading the article. For some reason I assumed that this was a foreign film when I sat down to watch it. The movie opens with Alejandro, a young boy no more than 11, standing with a group of men looking for work. The foreman tells Alejandro that there is no work for him and as the truck begins to drive off the boy jumps in the back. As the truck slowly begins to drive we see a skyline in the distance. It is New York City- yet the world Alejandro inhabits could exist in any third world country. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Alejandro lives with his sister, Isamar, in a small, dilapidated room over a auto repair shop in the slums of Queens in an area known as the Iron Triangle. He lives with residents in urban decay, sells candy for high prices on the subway, sells pirated DVD’s, and even occasionally steals. His sister sells things too, but not the kind of things bought in a store. One of the best moments in the film shows Alejandro realizing his sister is a prostitute. He never says anything, nor does he judge her. They are doing what it takes to survive. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> The two children save up enough money over time to purchase a beat-up food vending van. There intentions are to remodel the van (doing the work themselves, of course) and sell tacos and other food out of it. This is their American dream, to run a taco van. The boy is shattered when he realizes that the van will cost double the price he paid for it to be repaired. This is life on the streets. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> The director, Ramin Bahrani is an exciting new voice. His work is similar to old Italian Neorealist films, such as Bicycle Thieves (soon to be featured on A Movie A Week). He does not tell a story as much as explore the environment and conditions of the world his characters inhabit. The results are eye-opening. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;33. Million Dollar Baby&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Million Dollar Baby&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/779/MillionDollarBaby.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Clint Eastwood is a National Treasure and his Million Dollar Baby is a triumph. What begins as a story of hope ends as a story of utter despair; there is never a moment that is not truthful to the characters. The performances by Hilary Swank, Morgan Freeman and Clint Eastwood are all nothing short of perfect. We understand them, where they come from, and why they do what they do. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Many may have not watched the movie because they saw it is a boxing picture. This is no more a movie about boxing than Raging Bull is- this is a human story with deep implications that burn the soul. The ending has been deemed controversial in many circles. I suppose many do not believe that the final act in the film is moral. Certain groups even boycotted the film because of the ending. This is absurd. It does not matter whether you think the actions taken at the end of the film are moral or not, the point is that the characters are doing what they think is right. Winner of the 2005 Academy Award for Best Picture. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;32. Star Trek&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Star Trek&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/779/StarTrek.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> I don't know if I have seen a movie as simply entertaining as Star Trek in a very long time. J.J. Abrams (TV's Lost) has rebooted this franchise with such energy that it is hard to dismiss this film as another summer movie. The casting is perfect, and Abrams films the story at a relentless pace (he reminds of a young Robert Zemeckis) always moving the camera from side to side, or around the characters.<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> I have never been much of a Star Trek fan. The characters, with the exception of Spock, always seemed wooden and boring to me. Not here. Chris Pine, Zacahary Quinto, Karl Urban, Zoe Saldana, John Cho, Simon Pegg and Anton Yelchin all inject so much energy and life into their characters that one can only smile when they come on screen. Mix these great performances with an exceptional villian in Eric Bana, and fantastic special effects, and you end up with one of the most satisfying blockbusters in years. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> When watching this movie I feel like a ten year old boy, sitting up on the end theater seat, eyes wide open. This is not only the re-imagining of a long stale franchise, but a creative, bold new franchise in its own right. I eagerly look forward to the next installment. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;31. Kill Bill (Vol 1. / Vol. 2)&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Kill Bill&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/779/KillBill.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Quentin Tarantino, that most energetic of filmmakers, has created something truly mesmerizing in Kill Bill- a collage of style. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Working as a video store clerk in CA for years before selling his first screenplay, Tarantino was a student of the grindhouse, a form of theater that specialized in nothing but B Kung Fu movies, Spaghetti Westerns, and ridiculous action, horror, or porno flicks. He has followed the lesions of his teachers with exact precision with Kill Bill; this is a movie that does not defy genre, but embraces it. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Split into two sections (Vol. 1 and Vol. 2) Kill Bill assaulted its viewers with non-stop action that is beyond insane. The fight at the House of Blue Leaves sequence in which the Bride (Uma Thurman) takes on dozens of bad guys (and girls) with her sword belongs in the history books. Surely it is the bloodiest, most ridiculous, and outrageous battle sequence ever filmed. On top of the zany madcap action we have Tarantino’s always unique sense of dialogue and humor- making the film enjoyable even when action is not in the forefront. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> The second part of the film (Vol. 2) is the best. Here Tarantino leaves much of the Kung Fu behind and transitions to his other professors, the ones that created the wonderful Spaghetti Westerns. Vol. 2 is more of a straight revenge tale, but it is here where the characters really develop. The final sequences with Bill (the late David Carradine) have a surprising amount of emotional resonance. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> More than anything, Kill Bill is a showcase for Tarantino’s unique voice and talent; a true example of both style and substance. It is a fantastic ride. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;30. Zodiac&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Zodiac&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/779/Zodiac.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Master filmmaker David Fincher’s Zodiac is a film about obsession. It is the cinematic equivalent to a sore on the roof of your mouth, than you can not stop tonguing. Eventually the sore gets bigger and begins to bleed- yet you keep licking it anyway. This is what political cartoonist Robert Graysmith (Jake Gylenhaal) does over the course of the film. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> The movie features many grisly murders, but more than anything it is a simple detective story. The cops are hunting a serial killer that is taunting them with ciphers, encrypted messages using symbols. From the moment Graysmith cracks one of the Zodiac killer’s ciphers he is obsessed. We follow him through the film, see him lose his job and family, and confront the killer- who may not be the killer after all. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> The real life Zodiac murders remain to this day unsolved. Zodiac infers and suggests that it may have the answer, but in the end it has almost as much as Graysmith. While viewing the picture we understand that the story is real, and we join in on Graysmith’s obsession. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;29. Requiem for a Dream&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Requiem for a Dream&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/779/RequiemforaDream.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> This is what pain looks like. The destructive nature of drug addiction has never been explored more deeply than in Darren Aronofsky’s Requiem for a Dream. The film follows the lives of a boy, his best friend, girlfriend and mother as they all destroy their lives for their drugs. Screw D.A.R.E, McGruff the Crime Dog, or commercials involving fried eggs- this is the motion picture that every student in junior high should see. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> This is not a film about the dangers of pot, but the consequences of hardcore cocaine, heroin and methamphetamine consumption. What starts as a relatively happy unit ends with death, complete sexual humiliation, amputation, lies, deceit and despair. This is not a movie that you really need to see more than once. Aronofsky never falters in his skill as director, constantly putting the camera where the addiction is. The jump cuts, quick edits, and sounds all represent the spiraling, circular behavior of addiction. This is one of the scariest films ever made. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;28. Y Tu Mama Tambien&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Y Tu Mama Tambien&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/779/YTuMamaTambien.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> One of the greatest things about this decade has been the emergence of the new Mexican Cinema, helmed by filmmakers Alfonso Cuaron, Guillermo Del Toro and Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu. These three filmmakers above any others are showcasing Mexico as the home of some of the best filmmakers the world has to offer. Cuaron’s Y Tu Mama Tambien marked the beginning of this new Mexican cinema, and it is one of its best examples. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Told in the formula of a traditional road trip picture, Y Tu Mama Tambien is about 2 boys, a girl, friendship, and sexual awakening. There are moments are joyful as scenes from a John Hughes movie mixed with passages of sadness and profound understanding. As we travel with Julio (Gale Garcia Bernal) Tenoch (Diego luna) and Luisa (Maribel Verdu) towards the beach, we get the sense that this is a picture about realism. The boys are angry, confused, and constantly horny; the woman their lover, friend and mother. The film is renowned for its honest and realistic depiction of sex. The sex is not glamorized or exaggerated for the sakes of sensationalism on the screen- it is just there because in reality, teenagers have sex. This film is less interested with that truth than with the emotional implications of the characters actions. This is a movie about the feelings of adolesence, and could be perhaps the most honest depiction ever created about what it is like to be a teenager. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> This is a movie that is hard to classify- a true experience. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;27. King Kong&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;King Kong&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/779/KingKong.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> What a spectacle this is! King Kong is certainly one of the great entertainments of the decade. This remake surpasses even the original in terms of adventure and energy. The special effects are among the best ever done, and more importantly, they are all in the interest of the story. The performance by Naomi Watts is kind of brilliant, and I am still surprised that every time I watch this flick I relate to Kong. More than anything, I love how the film builds for the first hour and takes its time with the character development, only to have the final 2 hours filled with non-stop action. Sure the movie is long, but I am not one to complain about too much of a good thing.<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> The energy of the film is astounding. Jackson directs each scene effortlessly as we experience everything from a domino effect of Brontosauruses to large, maggot like creatures that eat human beings alive. And then there is Kong himself, expertly played using motion-capture technology by Andy Serkis. When Kong is on screen he is not just there, like in the previous Kong films. He is a character in his own right, with body language, facial expressions, and even deep looks in the eye. Kong is nothing short of a technical triumph. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> What makes Jackson’s King Kong a great film is not just the spectacle, but the heart. We feel for the beast that has fallen in love with the woman. In all of the previous Kong pictures he was the villain, the monster in the monster movie. In this film it is us who are the villains, that ravage his natural habitat, kidnap him, and force him to climb the Empire State Building. In the end, King Kong becomes a tragedy of almost Shakespearean beauty- quite a feat for a film that spends over an hour in a place called Skull Island. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;b&gt;26. Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street&lt;/b&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;img alt=&quot;Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street&quot; src=&quot;http://i.filmnet.com/review_files/779/SweeneyToddTheDemonBarberofFleetStreet.jpg&quot;/&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street is my favorite movie musical. There is none other like it. Tim Burton has created a London in this picture that goes perfectly alongside the worlds he has created in such films as Edward Scissorhands, and then meshes it perfectly with the lyrics to Stephen Sondheim’s classic Broadway production. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Johnny Depp (probably the decade's most entertaining actor) gives one of his best performances as Todd, while Helena Bonham Carter (Burton’s wife and muse) is an absolute show-stopper as Mrs. Lovett. The tale is certainly macabre; images of headless corpses falling to their doom and crumpling on the floor are still, to this day, stuck in my memory. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> Sweeney Todd showcases some of the best songs I have seen in a musical. The music works in relationship to the story, and not just to exist for a new song and dance number. This is what always bugs me about musicals. You will have a perfectly good story, with reasonable characters, and then all of a sudden they start singing like idiots. Sweeney Todd is more operatic that musical, the songs subdued, with the action going along at the beat of the music. None of the cast are overwhelmingly impressive singers, but this is actually a good thing. We feel the emotion come through in their voices, and we listen to the lyrics instead of being impressed by the big picture. <br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> This is certainly Tim Burton’s best film. Always expressionistic, ranging from somber, to deadly, to terrifying, to light. The ending is a real tragedy, for sure, but with a beginning and middle like this- what else is there to expect?<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> To view Shaun’s Top 25, &lt;a href = 'http://www.filmnet.com/reviews/best_movies_of_the_decade_by_shaunhenisey_part1'&gt;click here.&lt;/a&gt;'
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title => 'Artificial Intelligence: AI'
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short-body => '50. A.I. Artificial Intelligence Few films have been as misunderstood as Stephen Spielberg's A.I. - Artificial Intelligence. Originally intended to be a Stanley Kubrick production, when Spielberg announced that he was taking over the project after Kubrick's death, the media and critical community were skeptical at best. I remember viewing the ...'
teaser => 'Few films have been as misunderstood as Stephen Spielberg's A.I.'
title => 'Best Movies of the Decade Part 2'
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;Christmas draws nigh again and on its tail is a trail of Hollywood movie offerings released to lighten the pockets of holiday viewers. I missed the release of FOUR CHRISTMASES last year, but it has arrived on DVD this year on Santa’s sleigh. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;For some reason a lot of Christmas movies feature dysfunctional people in dysfunctional families, and somehow humor is derived from their misfortune, i.e. CHRISTMAS WITH THE CRANKS, DECK THE HALLS, SANTA CLAUS. FOUR CHRISTMASES is no different, it just has bigger name stars than in the other movies. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The premise of the story is that Brad (Vince Vaughn) and Kate (Reese Witherspoon) are a happily, unmarried couple with no plans to marry or have children. They both like to go away for the Christmas holidays and avoid family gatherings because of their own personal family issues and problems. They will usually make some excuse that they are performing some humanitarian work so as to avoid the holiday season with their relatives, and scoot off to some exotic sunny location to laze in the Sun. That is until their plane flight to Fiji is cancelled by bad weather and they are caught red handed on news lying about their holiday plans. Therefore, they have to make an effort to visit their disgruntled relatives.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I can actually understand a situation like this, as some of us do have relatives we wished live on a different planet. However, this movie goes out of its way to make them as strange and outlandish as possible – in order to draw humor from the quirky situations that arise. Brad has pro-wrestling brothers who like to sit on and mangle him, his mother (Sissy Spacek) is married to his college best friend. Kate’s mother and sister are religious fanatics. The mother is sexually interested in the church pastor and her father has a live in girlfriend. Of course, the parents are all divorced – therefore, the title FOUR CHRISTMASES.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Maybe families as unusual as this do exist. After all most of us have skeletons in our family closet that we probably don’t want the world to know about. In this case, Brad and Kate realise that their perfect life is not so perfect when it comes to their families. And that they don’t really know each other as well as they had believed – and the skeletons come tumbling out of the stockings.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I did laugh in some hilarious scenes like when the installation of a radar dish goes wrong and the TV set goes up in flames and when Reese is trying to chase after her pregnancy test kit in a jumping castle filled with kids. However, a lot of the humour is contrived and the situations created are forced. I sensed as if the actors (Reese and Vince) were trying very hard to be funny in many of the scenes, when the best comedies come naturally with little effort from the actors. This is a good try at Christmas humour but somehow it is lacking true mirth and good cheer.&lt;/p&gt;'
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dt-publish => '8 years ago'
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short-body => 'Christmas draws nigh again and on its tail is a trail of Hollywood movie offerings released to lighten the pockets of holiday viewers. I missed the release of FOUR CHRISTMASES last year, but it has arrived on DVD this year on Santa’s sleigh. For some reason a lot of Christmas movies feature dysfunctional people in dysfunctional families, and ...'
teaser => 'A good try at Christmas humour but somehow it is lacking true mirth and good cheer.'
title => 'Four Christmases'
type-id => 6
9 =>
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;On occasion, I do like to borrow a mindless movie about zombies/mutants who wreak death and destruction on the world, and I got exactly what I asked for – the mindless bit. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The year is somewhere in the future, on some distant planet where a mysterious machine hidden beneath the earth is converting the dead and dying into killer zombies. Throw into this kung fu, a mysterious cult that believes in a saviour who will come and save humanity by destroying the machine and John Malkovich and you will get a strange brew of zombie bodies. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Did I really understand what was going on? Not really. Did it really matter? Not really. It is after all a mutant zombie movie and things don’t really have to make sense as long as the body count keeps mounting. The surroundings of this science fiction world are computer generated, similar to what was seen in SIN CITY and THE SPIRIT. However, the quality of the CGI is inferior and the artificial look is detrimental to the quality of the movie. There is plenty of gore as expected: bodies being pierced by sharp objects, heads being decapitated. In fact the only moments of bright colour come from the bountiful splashes of blood thrown on screen. Otherwise, everything else is a haze of greys. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The movie begins in the trenches of a fierce battle. The first impression is that one is in the trenches of the western front of the First World War. Before long we have zombies amassing the field slaughtering men like chickens at a processing plant. Confused? I was. Then the movie flips to the near future and we have fighter monks (Ron Perlman) recruiting battled hardened soldiers (Thomas Jane) to fulfil a prophecy about saving humanity by destroying the zombie mutant machine. John Malkovich has a brief moment citing some lines before he is quickly killed off by the mutants. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I think this movie fails not just in the CGI quality department but also in the storyline and tension department. I realised somewhere in the middle of the movie – after a few hundred thousand people had been wiped out by this plague – that I wasn’t feeling any excitement or worry. I was on edge of my seat in the first 5 minutes of 28 DAYS LATER, which is a gold standard for zombie movies in my book. In fact I was busy looking at the clock and ended up reading the paper as innocent people were being slaughtered.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Somewhere in the middle of the religious mumbo jumbo and kung fu fighting, and Thomas Jane being converted into a half mutant my interested picked up towards the end. At least there was a satisfactory explanation to the chaos, but I realised I had gone through 90 minutes of horror without feeling any tension or fright for that matter. Fail.&lt;/p&gt;'
alias => 'mutant_chronicles'
dt-publish => '8 years ago'
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name => 'Horror'
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movie =>
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login => 'TimVoon'
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user-dir => 'user_files/'
short-body => 'On occasion, I do like to borrow a mindless movie about zombies/mutants who wreak death and destruction on the world, and I got exactly what I asked for – the mindless bit. The year is somewhere in the future, on some distant planet where a mysterious machine hidden beneath the earth is converting the dead and dying into killer zombies. Throw into...'
teaser => 'I realised I had gone through 90 minutes of horror without feeling any tension or fright.'
title => 'Mutant Chronicles'
type-id => 6
rss-link => 'reviews/dvd/?'
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  21. [0.11 ms] SELECT `rg`.* FROM `review_genres` AS `rg` WHERE (genre_id = '2')
  22. [11.36 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `r`.*, `vr`.`video_id`, `cr`.`channel_id`, `ur`.`user_id`, `mr`.`movie_id` FROM `reviews` AS `r` LEFT JOIN `video__reviews` AS `vr` ON vr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `channel__reviews` AS `cr` ON cr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `user__reviews` AS `ur` ON ur.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `movie__reviews` AS `mr` ON mr.review_id = r.review_id WHERE (1 AND r.`reviewer_id` = 1409 AND r.is_published_review = 1 AND r.is_deleted_review = 0) ORDER BY `r`.`dt_published_review` DESC
  23. [0.22 ms] SELECT `m`.* FROM `movies` AS `m` WHERE (movie_id = '67')
  24. [0.19 ms] SELECT `users`.* FROM `users` WHERE (user_id='1409')
  25. [0.1 ms] SELECT `rg`.* FROM `review_genres` AS `rg` WHERE (genre_id = '4')
  26. [26.09 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `r`.*, `vr`.`video_id`, `cr`.`channel_id`, `ur`.`user_id`, `mr`.`movie_id` FROM `reviews` AS `r` LEFT JOIN `video__reviews` AS `vr` ON vr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `channel__reviews` AS `cr` ON cr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `user__reviews` AS `ur` ON ur.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `movie__reviews` AS `mr` ON mr.review_id = r.review_id WHERE (1 AND r.`reviewer_id` = 1409 AND r.is_published_review = 1 AND r.is_deleted_review = 0) ORDER BY `r`.`dt_published_review` DESC
  27. [0.24 ms] SELECT `m`.* FROM `movies` AS `m` WHERE (movie_id = '605')
  28. [0.19 ms] SELECT `users`.* FROM `users` WHERE (user_id='1616')
  29. [0.1 ms] SELECT `rg`.* FROM `review_genres` AS `rg` WHERE (genre_id = '2')
  30. [16.35 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `r`.*, `vr`.`video_id`, `cr`.`channel_id`, `ur`.`user_id`, `mr`.`movie_id` FROM `reviews` AS `r` LEFT JOIN `video__reviews` AS `vr` ON vr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `channel__reviews` AS `cr` ON cr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `user__reviews` AS `ur` ON ur.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `movie__reviews` AS `mr` ON mr.review_id = r.review_id WHERE (1 AND r.`reviewer_id` = 1616 AND r.is_published_review = 1 AND r.is_deleted_review = 0) ORDER BY `r`.`dt_published_review` DESC
  31. [0.21 ms] SELECT `m`.* FROM `movies` AS `m` WHERE (movie_id = '595')
  32. [0.2 ms] SELECT `users`.* FROM `users` WHERE (user_id='1616')
  33. [0.1 ms] SELECT `rg`.* FROM `review_genres` AS `rg` WHERE (genre_id = '11')
  34. [4.05 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `r`.*, `vr`.`video_id`, `cr`.`channel_id`, `ur`.`user_id`, `mr`.`movie_id` FROM `reviews` AS `r` LEFT JOIN `video__reviews` AS `vr` ON vr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `channel__reviews` AS `cr` ON cr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `user__reviews` AS `ur` ON ur.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `movie__reviews` AS `mr` ON mr.review_id = r.review_id WHERE (1 AND r.`reviewer_id` = 1616 AND r.is_published_review = 1 AND r.is_deleted_review = 0) ORDER BY `r`.`dt_published_review` DESC
  35. [16.48 ms] SELECT `m`.* FROM `movies` AS `m` WHERE (movie_id = '301')
  36. [0.19 ms] SELECT `users`.* FROM `users` WHERE (user_id='1409')
  37. [0.1 ms] SELECT `rg`.* FROM `review_genres` AS `rg` WHERE (genre_id = '2')
  38. [1.68 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `r`.*, `vr`.`video_id`, `cr`.`channel_id`, `ur`.`user_id`, `mr`.`movie_id` FROM `reviews` AS `r` LEFT JOIN `video__reviews` AS `vr` ON vr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `channel__reviews` AS `cr` ON cr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `user__reviews` AS `ur` ON ur.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `movie__reviews` AS `mr` ON mr.review_id = r.review_id WHERE (1 AND r.`reviewer_id` = 1409 AND r.is_published_review = 1 AND r.is_deleted_review = 0) ORDER BY `r`.`dt_published_review` DESC
  39. [0.21 ms] SELECT `m`.* FROM `movies` AS `m` WHERE (movie_id = '561')
  40. [0.2 ms] SELECT `users`.* FROM `users` WHERE (user_id='1409')
  41. [0.11 ms] SELECT `rg`.* FROM `review_genres` AS `rg` WHERE (genre_id = '7')
  42. [11.26 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `r`.*, `vr`.`video_id`, `cr`.`channel_id`, `ur`.`user_id`, `mr`.`movie_id` FROM `reviews` AS `r` LEFT JOIN `video__reviews` AS `vr` ON vr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `channel__reviews` AS `cr` ON cr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `user__reviews` AS `ur` ON ur.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `movie__reviews` AS `mr` ON mr.review_id = r.review_id WHERE (1 AND r.`reviewer_id` = 1409 AND r.is_published_review = 1 AND r.is_deleted_review = 0) ORDER BY `r`.`dt_published_review` DESC
  43. [0.18 ms] SELECT `m`.* FROM `movies` AS `m` WHERE (movie_id = '549')
  44. [2.83 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `rg`.* FROM `review_genres` AS `rg` LEFT JOIN `reviews` AS `r` ON rg.`genre_id` = r.`genre_id` WHERE (1 AND r.`review_type_id` = 6 AND r.`is_published_review` = 1 AND r.`is_deleted_review` = 0) ORDER BY `rg`.`genre_name` ASC

File Information

146 Files Included
Total Size: 1495.1K
Basepath: /mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/settings/../../../

Application Files

/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/Bootstrap.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/channels/models/Channels.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/default/models/Assistant.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/default/models/Filters.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/reviews/controllers/ReviewsController.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/reviews/models/Movies.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/reviews/models/ReviewGenres.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/reviews/models/Reviews.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/users/models/Users.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/videos/models/Videos.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/settings/config.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/system/acl.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/system/routes.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/Controller/Plugin/Acl.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/Controller/Plugin/AjaxCheck.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/Controller/Plugin/AutoLogin.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/Controller/Plugin/FlashMessenger.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/Controller/Plugin/InmailMessageCount.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/Paginator/Adapter/DbSelect.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/View/Serializer.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/View/Xslt.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/www/index.php

Zend Library Files

/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Assert/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Exception.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Resource.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Resource/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Role.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Role/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Role/Registry.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Role/Registry/Exception.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Auth.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Auth/Storage/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Auth/Storage/Session.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Cache.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Cache/Backend.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Cache/Backend/ExtendedInterface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Cache/Backend/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Cache/Backend/Memcached.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Cache/Core.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Config.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action/Helper/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action/Helper/FlashMessenger.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action/Helper/ViewRenderer.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action/HelperBroker.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action/HelperBroker/PriorityStack.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Dispatcher/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Dispatcher/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Dispatcher/Standard.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Exception.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Front.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Plugin/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Plugin/Broker.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Plugin/ErrorHandler.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Request/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Request/Http.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Response/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Response/Http.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Rewrite.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Route.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Route/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Route/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Route/Module.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Route/Regex.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Adapter/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Adapter/Pdo/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Adapter/Pdo/Mysql.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Expr.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Profiler.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Profiler/Query.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Select.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Statement.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Statement/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Statement/Pdo.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Table/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Exception.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Inflector.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/PregReplace.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/StringToLower.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Word/CamelCaseToDash.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Word/CamelCaseToSeparator.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Word/Separator/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Word/SeparatorToSeparator.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Word/UnderscoreToSeparator.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Form.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Json.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Json/Expr.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Loader.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Loader/Autoloader.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Loader/PluginLoader.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Loader/PluginLoader/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Locale.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Locale/Data/Translation.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Filter/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Filter/Priority.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Formatter/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Formatter/Simple.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Writer/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Writer/Stream.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Paginator.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Paginator/Adapter/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Paginator/ScrollingStyle/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Paginator/ScrollingStyle/Jumping.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Registry.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Session.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Session/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Session/Exception.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Session/Namespace.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Session/SaveHandler/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Translate.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Translate/Adapter.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Translate/Adapter/Gettext.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Uri.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Validate/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Version.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/HeadMeta.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/HeadTitle.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Placeholder/Container.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Placeholder/Container/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Placeholder/Container/Standalone.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Placeholder/Registry.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Interface.php

ZFDebug Library Files

/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Database.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Exception.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/File.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Html.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Memory.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Registry.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Text.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Time.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Variables.php

Memory Usage

Controller: 10151.94K

Custom Timers

Controller: 878.67 ms

Overall Timers

reviews
reviews
list
Avg: 1817.84 ms / 1 requests
Min: 1817.84 ms
Max: 1817.84 ms

Reset timers by sending ZFDEBUG_RESET as a GET/POST parameter

Registered Instances

Zend_View_Helper_Placeholder_Registry => Zend_View_Helper_Placeholder_Registry Object()
acl => Zend_Acl Object()
baseDir => 'http://www.filmnet.com/'
cache => Zend_Cache_Core Object()
config => Zend_Config Object()
db => Zend_Db_Adapter_Pdo_Mysql Object()
translator => Zend_Translate Object()
copyright 1.8.0/5.2.10-2ubuntu6variables Variableshtml HTMLdatabase 44 in 538.28 msfile 146 Filesmemory 20147K of 1024Mtime 1817.84 msregistry Registry (7)«