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21-30 of 83

This year's authentic must-see horror.

The first legitimately frightening cinematic experience of the year, The Last House on the Left ditches the goofball comedy elements of its namesake predecessor while embracing that film's bleak viciousness. Following the same plot trajectory -- two teenage girls (Sara Paxton and Martha MacIsaac) come into contact with a gang of dirtbag criminals, ...

Read more

Review by: TomElce

Added: 8 years ago

 

The Wackness is more affecting than one anticipates.

The Wackness plays more naturally than many of its peers in the so-called coming-of-age mould, crafting sympathetic, authenticized characters and showing their lives as they known then unravelling direct before the camera. Writer-director Jonathan Levine and cinematographer Petra Korner achieve the aesthetic glory that the dreadful Step Up 2 the ...

Read more

Review by: TomElce

Added: 8 years ago

Martyrs is one part potential great, one part lumbering dud.

Martyrs begins with the same visceral punch of Alexandre Aja's Haute Tension only to eventually descend to the mediocre level of Hostel, crippled by convolutions and unnecessary over-explanation. What essentially begins as, and remains for the first 45 minutes, a nifty little horror exercise collapses the more writer-director Pascal Laugier ...

Read more

Review by: TomElce

Added: 8 years ago

 

Everything in Up has a superior alternative elsewhere.

Up, the latest Pixar release, attempts to marry mawkish sentimentality with light humour in order to satisfy both its target audiences: the demanding adult and the hyper child. Problem is, the film comes the year following Andrew Stanton's sublime WALL-E, inspiring only a shrug of the shoulders when one considers how far Pixar's art has sunk with ...

Read more

Review by: TomElce

Added: 8 years ago

Coraline's a superlatively animated and wonderfully told motion picture.

Viewers taking a chance on seeing the overrated Up in cinemas would serve themselves better with Henry Selick's more imaginative and lively animated Coraline. An onslaught of out-there animated scenarios play out as the eponymous character (voiced by Dakota Fanning) discovers a new world on the other side of a small door in the home she shares with ...

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Review by: TomElce

Added: 8 years ago

 

Everything that happens had a much greater impact in the original.

Don’t do drugs. Or else you’ll end up stabbed, raped and bleeding to death in the woods. That seems to be the message of The Last House on the Left, the slick new remake of Wes Craven’s shocking directorial debut. While horror movies of the ‘70s had a gnarly soul about them – Craven’s original was commenting on the orgy of violence America ...

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Review by: MiamiMovieCritic

Added: 8 years ago

Fascinating and utterly believable.

Gomorrah, the highly acclaimed modern gangster film by Italian filmmaker Mateo Garrone, is fascinating and utterly believable… but it’s also a touch bit overrated. This feels more like a piece of documentary journalism than an epic crime saga. The DVD cover box quotes one critic who called it the greatest mafia movie ever. As if. One problem with ...

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Review by: MiamiMovieCritic

Added: 8 years ago

 

It was pretty cool!!!!

After a huge disappointment we had with the apartment Frank, Joe and I decided to go see the new movie “Drag Me To Hell.” They had seen it before me but they were willing to see it again… they apparently liked it. Here is what I thought: For a Sam and Ivan Raimi flick, it was pretty cool!!!! I was very surprised to see that there were so many great...

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Review by: RichardPeter

Added: 8 years ago

It could have been thought out a little better.

I remember seeing the previews for this film a while back and thinking that it would be one of the best films of the year, well, it was a pretty damn good movie but I would not call it the best movie. It was a pretty good movie but goddamn was it confusing. From what I can gather, the film was about a group of people who get into a hospital elevator...

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Review by: RichardPeter

Added: 8 years ago

 

One of the most dark, humorous, pornographic gorefests... I have ever seen.

So I recently had the pleasure of watching a movie called Cockhammer by Hack Movies and after seeing the movie all I can say is: “What the fuck did I just watch?” To begin to describe what I saw on my computer is like trying to explain what a tesseract is and it’s going to make it hard to review this movie but I will try to do it anyway. From what ...

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Review by: RichardPeter

Added: 8 years ago

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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;The first legitimately frightening cinematic experience of the year, The Last House on the Left ditches the goofball comedy elements of its namesake predecessor while embracing that film's bleak viciousness. Following the same plot trajectory -- two teenage girls (Sara Paxton and Martha MacIsaac) come into contact with a gang of dirtbag criminals, are subsequently raped and (in one case) murdered by them, with the villains afterwards heading unknowingly to the lake home of Paxton's Mari and her parents (Monica Potter and Tony Goldwyn) -- this new film boasts significantly higher production values and more concise screenwriting than Wes Craven's 1972 schlocker, which itself borrowed extensively from Bergman's Virgin Spring. Writers Adam Alleca and Carl Ellsworth, as well as inexperienced director Dennis Iliadis, may trade in easy-to-box cinematic character types, but they also trade in breathtakingly atmospheric tension peppered with the same nihilistic violence that finds the films of Rob Zombie (The Devil's Rejects, Halloween) being overlooked. The apparent cruelty and voyeurism with which the movie's proceedings unfold offset by more moral complexity than one finds in watered-down J-horror remakes and a poignant sense of tragedy too often absent in the genre, The Last House on the Left makes for one of the most surprising, multi-layered and, indeed, best films of the year.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;If one thought it impossible for The Last House on the Left to prove more shocking and audience-diving than its '70s counterpart, Dennis Iliadis makes sure to push the envelope, expanding both on the original film's themes and increasing the general unpleasantness of the violence. The violence is often explicit, the film opening with a cruel double homicide in which lead villain Krug (an excellent Garret Dillahunt) taunts one of his cop victims with a photograph of his children upon which his blood drips, then moving on to the unnerving extended woodlands sequence in which Mari and Paige (MacIsaac) are brutally tormented by their captors -- Krug's bitter girlfriend Sadie (Riki Lindholme), brother Francis (Aaron Paul) and Krug's unwilling son Justin (Spencer Treak Clark). By refusing to shy away from the horrific rape and violence that transpires, Iliadis puts into perspective what later follows once the group arrive at the home of Mari's parents. Lest anyone suspect the filmmakers have no knack for creating intense unease out of anything other than explicit violence, the segment is broken up by numerous standout shots, cinematographer Sharone Meir capturing the surroundings eerily, especially in between-screaming interludes, where moments of would-be peaceful tranquility have been transformed into quiet horror -- much as Meir herself achieved in 2004's hugely affecting Mean Creek.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Once action switches to the lakeside getaway of Mari's schoolteacher mother and doctor father, The Last House on the Left takes another rejuvenating turn. With the knowledge of their daughter's ordeal steadily coming to their attention, Emma and John Collingwood are forced to make a decision on how to deal with the people they unwittingly allowed to stay in their guest home. With help miles away, they choose retaliation against Krug and company, the result being that the tables are turned on the antagonists, Last House on the Left doing away with the gleefulness with which the original parents took these actions thirty-seven years ago and hammering the bleakness of proceedings home. Devoid of humour, the film is a superior retread alternative to this year's recent, more self-aware My Bloody Valentine, equally blood-soaked but more emotionally and technically rewarding.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;When a film's marketing campaign does an incredible disservice by virtually revealing its entire plot before audiences have even seen the opening credits (as the trailers and TV spots for Last House have done), it takes a genuinely excellent motion picture to pull things back. Fortunately, The Last House on the Left qualifies as the best horror movie of the year. It is atmospherically lensed, the scenery -- be it the woods or the lake house -- captured in a manner both doom-laden and aesthetically better than its low-budget sibling (the shot of characters walking down a road as a sign reading &amp;quot;Lake ends in the road&amp;quot; looms overhead is one of the more memorable shots). It avoids the cheap gotcha! tactics so frequently employed by lame teenage slasher films of the day, boasting approximately one superfluous jump scare and zero spontaneous revivals. Finally, the pacing is concise without being rapid or uneven, director Iliadis allowing events to unfold at a natural pace that doesn't cater to the MTV generation and as such puts you right in the moment. Technically proficient, intelligently written and fiercely uncompromising, The Last House on the Left is this year's authentic must-see horror.&lt;/p&gt;'
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;The Wackness plays more naturally than many of its peers in the so-called coming-of-age mould, crafting sympathetic, authenticized characters and showing their lives as they known then unravelling direct before the camera. Writer-director Jonathan Levine and cinematographer Petra Korner achieve the aesthetic glory that the dreadful Step Up 2 the Streets limply attempted in the same year while Levine weaves a story equally relatable and narratively appealing. For drug-dealing teenager Luke Shapiro (Josh Peck), the summer of 1994 represents a profound change in his life that all adults who see the film will have likely experienced. Just out of high school and with college looming over the horizon, Luke still isn't entirely comfortable in his own skin, something that means difficulties when he begins to form a strong bond with the same-aged Stephanie (Olivia Thirlby), the stepdaughter of the psychotherapist (Ben Kingsley) that counsels Luke and also purchases drugs from him.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;For Luke, passage into adulthood and sexual awakening comes at the same time, Levine capturing his growth wonderfully, refusing to iron out the awkwardness of human interaction so often absent from more marketed studio fare (rather than present a simple protag-gets-the-girl film, Levine puts forth moments of immense embarassment and opposing emotional reactions that are far more believable). Emotionally, The Wackness is more affecting than one anticipates going in, putting you into the moment with the pitch-perfect, nostalgic-to-the-nineties musical soundtrack and truly human creations. As a film of unsanitized romance, The Wackness boasts a standout moment far more romantically powerful than anything of the overrated, inferior Slumdog Millionaire; Though their feelings for each other aren't exactly on a level, the sequence in which Stephanie and Luke share their first kiss is beautifully shot and acted (Thirlby and Peck share a great chemistry) -- one of several components that forgives Wackness's sometimes in-your-face characterizations and more obviously by-the-numbers elements.&lt;/p&gt;'
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;Martyrs begins with the same visceral punch of Alexandre Aja's Haute Tension only to eventually descend to the mediocre level of Hostel, crippled by convolutions and unnecessary over-explanation. What essentially begins as, and remains for the first 45 minutes, a nifty little horror exercise collapses the more writer-director Pascal Laugier shoehorns in superfluous elements that are actually rather stock to begin with. Had Martyrs continued down the narrower, more personal path it appeared to be heading, the results would have been all the better, effective much in the same way as Greg McLean's underrated Wolf Creek. As is, the movie winds up a series of woefully ineffective torture takes, repetetive long before the closing credits come and not nearly crafted with enough skill to excuse its almost total lack of morality.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;A girl (Mylene Jampanoi) runs into view at the opening of Martyrs, bloody and beaten, the recipient of cruel torture both mental and physical. Deeply scarred and now mentally disturbed, her nights are haunted by the presence-apparent of a dead girl. Fifteen years onwards, the same girl storms into the home of a rich French family and shoots them all with a shotgun, the implication being that the parents of the household were somehow involved with her ordeal. Calling a friend (Morjana Alaoui) who arrives to assist in cleaning up the bloody mess of the home, it becomes quickly clear that their story has yet to come full circle.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Martyrs is one part potential great, one part lumbering dud, totally lacking in depth. The opening 45 minutes are simultaneously disquieting, hectic, grim and brutally affecting. Driven to murder an entire family unit on the basis of thinking she recognises them as her torturers, Jampanoi's Lucie is written as a terminally ill woman horrifically consumed by events that were out of her control. Fearing for her friend's sanity and not anywhere near as sure that Lucie has identified the true culprits, Alaoui's Anna nonetheless comes to her friend's aide as a victim of childhood abuse herself, able to somehow relate to Lucie and sympathise with her on such a deep level that she'll even help her in such awful circumstances. Their bond, though built on tragedy, gives the film its fleeting heart, and a moment where both girls find themselves contemplating the gravity of what they've become involved with is the film's greatest.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;It's a shame, then, that Laugier puts such emphasis on wholly uninteresting ideas during the second half that it robs Martyrs of its effectiveness and calls attention to its decidedly less noble aspects. Without wanting to give anything away, it's necessary to mention that events in the film take a few turns that serve to iron out potential audience grievances and fail miserably. The film's misogyny is explained by a dopey character speech while Laugier attempts to give some egregious justification to the actions of the two female leads by another of his overly convenient narrative turns. With new elements and, indeed, characters thrown suddenly into the mix, Martyrs loses its footing disastrously, meaning that the complete lack of scares previously excused by the film's personal effectiveness serves to become a greater audience annoyance. At the very least, it is fair to expect that Laugier's sub-Saw plot devices might actually lead somewhere... Alas, Martyrs comes to a finish that qualifies as such a non-event it gets you wondering why exactly you ever wasted your time, spent the money or bought into this film's sorely misplaced hype.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;For what it's worth, the acting performances are generally good, while the film's cinematography is better than one might initially expect (again re-calling much of what made Haute Tension such a horror masterpiece) and the gore effects are appropriately stomach-turning. Leads Jampanoi and Alaoui are both fiercely committed to their roles, and live and breathe the motivations and actions taken by their characters, not putting a foot wrong and certainly scoring the film some points. What they cannot do, however, is make up for Martyrs' poorly cobbled-together screenplay, exploitative tone and general pointlessness. A half-competent exercise in gorno it may be, Martyrs is still half-garbage.&lt;/p&gt;'
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short-body => 'Martyrs begins with the same visceral punch of Alexandre Aja's Haute Tension only to eventually descend to the mediocre level of Hostel, crippled by convolutions and unnecessary over-explanation. What essentially begins as, and remains for the first 45 minutes, a nifty little horror exercise collapses the more writer-director Pascal Laugier ...'
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;Up, the latest Pixar release, attempts to marry mawkish sentimentality with light humour in order to satisfy both its target audiences: the demanding adult and the hyper child. Problem is, the film comes the year following Andrew Stanton's sublime WALL-E, inspiring only a shrug of the shoulders when one considers how far Pixar's art has sunk with Pete Docter's (and co-director Brad Peterson's) film. Compared to WALL-E -- or even non-Pixar efforts like Monster House and Bolt -- the film simply doesn't satisfy. Docter and co. are simply going through the motions, re-packaging elements that have been met with indifference in the live-action form and banking on their studio's reputation to qualify an Oscar nom at the beginning of next year. This isn't to say that Up is a totally bad movie (it is quite good in spurts), but were it not made by Pixar, perhaps viewers and critics would be more willing to examine its flaws.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The opening montage relating the entire life of Up's chief protagonist Carl Fredrickson (voiced by Ed Asner) is the sequence everyone's been talking about, but even this scene doesn't deserve its raves. Pushing sentiment ad nauseum, it's almost as if Docter himself is physically poking you in the eyes with his broad attempts at soliciting tears. In part of this montage, the tried-and-only-sometimes-true act of describing shapes in clouds is repeated thick, and we can pretend its something spectacular this time around because it's a &amp;quot;feat of animation.&amp;quot; The musical score that punctuates the montage is pitch-perfect, the introduction of Carl (as a boy) to his lifelong and then-perky partner is the best moment of this segment. The manipulative shot of Carl holding a balloon -- an unnecessary link to the story that follows -- is the worst.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Now an old man, Carl is facing the prospect of living out the remainder of his days following an inadvertent stike on a construction worker. Rather than leave his home, he sets out to fulfill a promise he made to his now-departed Ellie. Using a giant rainbow of inflated balloons, he (and his house) takes to the sky en route to a natural triumph named Paradise Falls. Obliviously, he's taken on some &amp;quot;much-needed&amp;quot; comic relief in the form of a tubby Asian scout named Russell (Jordan Nagai), whose attempts to qualify for his final badge took him under Carl's home moments before the defiant old man soured into the skies. So begins a mix of maudlin drama and hyperactive comedy.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;It has been suggested elsewhere that if 2008's Bolt were a movie by Pixar Animation Studios, it would have met higher praise than it did and probably won an Oscar. Up highlights audiences' continuing willingness to overlook the flaws in their product to adhere to the silly suggestion that anything the studio behind Toy Story and The Incredibles makes turns to gold. Not nearly as unbearable as Cars, the movie passes for watchability when it should be sky high in its achievements. When Carl and his junior companion reach Paradise Falls, the film should become wondrous -- the opportunity for greatness surely opens up as soon as they sorta-set down. Alas, the alternately perilous and perversely humorous sequences between Carl and Russell set onboard the house-as-zepellin prove to be the best (the most emotionally impactful and simultaneously funny scenes). When they arrive at their much-hyped destination the filmmakers pile on the usual garbage we've become familiar with -- comic relief talking animals, a hero-cum-villain that affords Carl his last-act conscience crisis and an uninteresting subplot centering around a &amp;quot;Snape.&amp;quot;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Everything in Up, unlike with the standard-setting Toy Story, has a superior alternative elsewhere. Hayao Miyazaki movies deal with themes of spontaneous flight with far more craft and wonder, Bolt portrayed talking animals with far more wit and nuance, The Red Balloon beats Up's standout moment (the house being ripped from its roots by the mass of coloured balloons) with its beautiful end, and Peter Jackson's excellent revision of King Kong showed what could be achieved in the setting of a lost island. Take away these less-than-complimentary comparisons and analyse Up's efforts by themselves and what you find is that the film simply cannot blow you away. Emotion is laid on thick and comedy is too broadly in-your-face to inspire a great number of laughs. The most notable innovations the otherwise exceptionally-animated movie gives us is the re-introduction of blood into the animated form and a climactic face-off between the villain and hero that thankfully takes a different route than the bad guy simply changing his ways. Sure, Up is the best story about an emerging friendship between a widowed old man and an annoying young boy you'll see all year, but that doesn't warrant such wild hyperbole.&lt;/p&gt;'
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short-body => 'Up, the latest Pixar release, attempts to marry mawkish sentimentality with light humour in order to satisfy both its target audiences: the demanding adult and the hyper child. Problem is, the film comes the year following Andrew Stanton's sublime WALL-E, inspiring only a shrug of the shoulders when one considers how far Pixar's art has sunk with ...'
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;Viewers taking a chance on seeing the overrated Up in cinemas would serve themselves better with Henry Selick's more imaginative and lively animated Coraline. An onslaught of out-there animated scenarios play out as the eponymous character (voiced by Dakota Fanning) discovers a new world on the other side of a small door in the home she shares with her eternally busy parents (Teri Hatcher and John Hodgman). Meeting her button-eyed Other Mother and Other Father, who dote on the enchanted Coraline, giving her all the attention she's been craving, from a dedicated piano tune to a pristine meal. There's just one catch if Coraline wishes to stay in this seemingly better world: she has to trade in her eyes for black buttons. Rapidly, the facade of this alternate reality unravels for Coraline, Selick (notably of the masterful Nightmare Before Christmas) subsequently making the film all about nightmarish imagery and an increasingly scraggly transformation of its lead villain, the treacherous other mother.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Based on the Neil Gaiman concept, Selick's film doesn't rest on the simple fact that its image of grinning, button-eyed parents being outwardly creepy to get through. Rather, the ante is upped in the potentially lethal game Coraline starts with Other Mother, the girl battling to free the monster's previous victims as well as her parents, for whom her ongoing experience has given Coraline a newfound appreciation of. With its endearing melancholic mood giving way to an altogether more threatening tone, Coraline achieves a seamless combination of styles that Up could not, writer-director Selick giving the movie it's aesthetic and visceral charm while pushing a novel subtext on being grateful for one's lot in life. Coraline's a superlatively animated (the tunnel entrances and exits to the Other World notable standouts) and wonderfully told motion picture, for which the only major setback is the lack of a Monster House-like ending - when we anticipate a grand face-off/destruction ending, the movie allows itself to come to a steady conclusion, albeit one in which hunched-over sidekick Wybie Lovat (Robert Bailey Jr.) finally gets something to do.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;(Note: This review cannot comment on the effectiveness of Coraline's 3-D use, since attempts to view this format at home were frustrating at best. Storyline-wise, the film's strong enough to not need the extra dimension.)&lt;/p&gt;'
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short-body => 'Viewers taking a chance on seeing the overrated Up in cinemas would serve themselves better with Henry Selick's more imaginative and lively animated Coraline. An onslaught of out-there animated scenarios play out as the eponymous character (voiced by Dakota Fanning) discovers a new world on the other side of a small door in the home she shares with ...'
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;Don’t do drugs. Or else you’ll end up stabbed, raped and bleeding to death in the woods.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;That seems to be the message of The Last House on the Left, the slick new remake of Wes Craven’s shocking directorial debut. While horror movies of the ‘70s had a gnarly soul about them – Craven’s original was commenting on the orgy of violence America unleashed on Southeast Asia – the horror remakes of today are products of nothing more than a corporate bottom line. There’s no reference point here; the story is self-contained, and on its own terms only sporadically engaging.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;This is certainly one of the more audacious horror remakes of recent years. The original film depicted (in what felt like real time) the rape and attempted murder of two teenage girls. Is this really the kind of material that can be repackaged for the multiplex crowd? Apparently it is: the remake ruled the box office last March, beating out Zack Snyder’s Watchmen for the top spot.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;One thing the filmmakers get right is the casting of the girls. Sara Paxton (she’s still doing Disney TV shows like “Jonas” and “Wizards of Waverly Place,” for chrissakes!) and Martha MacIsaac (she played the Goldslick vodka-loving girl who Michael Cera wanted to lose his virginity to in Superbad) are about as squeaky clean as it gets. Putting them in harm’s way – and showing what happens to them in graphic, unnerving detail – gives the first half of the film a shuddery impact.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Mari (Paxton) is on vacation with her parents (Tony Goldwyn and Monica Potter) at their summer house in the woods. She borrows the family car and goes to pick up her friend Paige (MacIsaac). The girls meet up with a sullen-looking guy (Spencer Treat Clark), and they all end up going back to his motel room to smoke pot. They’re doomed! Doomed, I tell ya!&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;What happens next would be off-limits in most mainstream movies, but here it plays out in excruciating, extended detail. You might expect something like this to happen in an underground shocker like Gaspar Noé’s Irreversible, but not in a big-budget horror movie marketed to teenagers.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Still, for all of this new film’s disproportionate shock value, everything that happens had a much greater impact in the original. The casting of the gang that terrorizes the girls is the biggest problem. They’re relatively clean-cut, almost attractive. They express some class resentment toward Mari and her parents, but beyond that, it’s difficult to tell who these people are or where they came from. (In Craven’s film, the gang looked and acted like the scum of the earth.) They don’t look all that scary, which makes it easier to remember that none of this is really happening – it’s all being filmed on a movie set. The tagline of the original was: “Keep telling yourself… it’s only a movie!” But you don’t have to do that while watching the 2009 version of Last House on the Left. Certainly not during the improbable last 30 minutes, when Mari’s hapless yuppie parents become unstoppable killing machines.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;This is a movie-movie, one with stunning locations and gorgeous anamorphic widescreen cinematography. But what’s up with that? At the end of the day, what’s the point of a beautifully filmed rape scene, anyway?&lt;/p&gt;'
alias => 'the_last_house_on_the_left'
dt-publish => '8 years ago'
genre =>
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name => 'Horror'
logo => 'logo.jpg'
movie =>
__attr__id => 379
cover => 'cover.jpg'
title => 'The Last House on the Left'
rating => 40
reviewer =>
__attr__id => 84
avatar => 'MiamiMovieCritic.jpg'
login => 'MiamiMovieCritic'
review-count => 210
user-dir => 'user_files/'
short-body => 'Don’t do drugs. Or else you’ll end up stabbed, raped and bleeding to death in the woods. That seems to be the message of The Last House on the Left, the slick new remake of Wes Craven’s shocking directorial debut. While horror movies of the ‘70s had a gnarly soul about them – Craven’s original was commenting on the orgy of violence America ...'
teaser => 'Everything that happens had a much greater impact in the original.'
title => 'The Last House on the Left'
type-id => 6
6 =>
__attr__id => 475
__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;Gomorrah, the highly acclaimed modern gangster film by Italian filmmaker Mateo Garrone, is fascinating and utterly believable… but it’s also a touch bit overrated. This feels more like a piece of documentary journalism than an epic crime saga. The DVD cover box quotes one critic who called it the greatest mafia movie ever. As if.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;One problem with the film is that it lacks context. Most viewers who don’t know anything about the Camorra going in will be completely lost. Only until the end credits do we really understand how powerful the crime syndicate truly is. (Its members invested in the 9/11 memorial fund.) So the scenes of gangsters visiting sewing factories and collecting payments may come across as somewhat arbitrary to some audiences. This is a film for Italian audiences with limited crossover appeal.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;My biggest complaint is that I had to rent the DVD at Blockbuster. That’s because IFC Films, which is distributing Gomorrah, cut a deal with Blockbuster to make all of its titles “Blockbuster Exclusives.” That means it’s not available on Netflix or anywhere else. Indie distributors are on the chopping block, so IFC was probably forced to do this to survive. Still, it’s unfortunate. IFC distributes a lot of great movies each year (Hunger, Summer Hours, Antichrist – just this year alone!), and more often than not those movies open in select cities – which means most people have to wait for the DVD to come out. (Speaking of Antichrist: How is Blockbuster going to handle the release of that unrated, highly graphic film? What’s the point of watching an R-rated Blockbuster DVD of Antichrist anyway?) To limit both the theatrical release AND the DVD release seems completely unfair.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Anyway, as I was about to say before I got off on a rant, Gomorrah is a finely crafted gangster film. It often doesn’t feel like a movie, and I think that’s one of its virtues. The first hour has an everyday feel to it, but many scenes at the end are interrupted by shocking, sudden acts of violence. We’ve heard references in other movies and TV shows (like The Godfather and The Sopranos) of crime families “being at war,” but Gomorrah is really the first non-documentary film to give us a good idea of what that would look like. The violence in this film is utterly meaningless and unforgiving.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Technically, the film can’t be overpraised. I’m reminded of the handheld immediacy of Amores Perros, the first film by Alejandro González Iñárritu. All of the actors are superb, and I was particularly moved by the scenes with the younger actors: Salvatore Abruzzese as Totò, the grocery delivery boy who’s forced to make a decision no 13-year-old should ever have to make; and Marco Macor and Ciro Petrone as Marco and Ciro, who, as mindless as they are, don’t deserve what’s coming to them.&lt;/p&gt;'
alias => 'gomorrah'
dt-publish => '8 years ago'
genre =>
__attr__id => 4
name => 'Drama'
logo => 'logo.jpg'
movie =>
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cover => 'cover.jpg'
title => 'Gomorrah'
rating => 60
reviewer =>
__attr__id => 84
avatar => 'MiamiMovieCritic.jpg'
login => 'MiamiMovieCritic'
review-count => 210
user-dir => 'user_files/'
short-body => 'Gomorrah, the highly acclaimed modern gangster film by Italian filmmaker Mateo Garrone, is fascinating and utterly believable… but it’s also a touch bit overrated. This feels more like a piece of documentary journalism than an epic crime saga. The DVD cover box quotes one critic who called it the greatest mafia movie ever. As if. One problem with ...'
teaser => 'Fascinating and utterly believable.'
title => 'Gomorrah'
type-id => 6
7 =>
__attr__id => 472
__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;After a huge disappointment we had with the apartment Frank, Joe and I decided to go see the new movie “Drag Me To Hell.” They had seen it before me but they were willing to see it again… they apparently liked it. Here is what I thought:&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;For a Sam and Ivan Raimi flick, it was pretty cool!!!! I was very surprised to see that there were so many great ‘jump-out’ scary scenes for a PG-13 and there were some great make-up effects too. There were points where the movie scared the shit out of me and I would jump back or scream out obscenities.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;For those who know the Raimi bros and their unique style of horror, you’d know that there would be some pretty funny moments in any of their horror movies. This movie isn’t an exception. There were several subtle humor points throughout the movie and I really enjoyed the scene with the goat (It’s not that kind of scene) and the scene where the old lady attacks the young woman both alive and dead. There were some points where it was so sick and gross that it was funny. Overall it was pretty scary and pretty funny at the same time.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I am not going to go into a full movie review; it would be way too long to read. What I also found out is that Raimi is making a 4th “Evil Dead” movie as well as an “Evil Dead” remake. Word around the camp fire is that “Drag Me To Hell” is going to be connected with the 4th “Evil Dead” installment. Justin Long’s character, after the end scene, would go to the cabin that he was talking about and there would start the next “ED” movie. Plus, there were several nods to “Evil Dead” in this movie like ancient demons, the fast tracking camera work, the opening credits that were over a book that resembled the Book of the Dead.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;What I can’t understand is, poor Bruce Campbell is getting old and I don’t know if he would be able to do another “Evil Dead” movie by 2012. Although he has proven that he is still kicking with his new movie and TV show.&lt;/p&gt;'
alias => 'drag_me_to_hell'
dt-publish => '8 years ago'
genre =>
__attr__id => 7
name => 'Horror'
logo => 'logo.jpg'
movie =>
__attr__id => 362
cover => 'cover.jpg'
title => 'Drag Me to Hell'
rating => 0
reviewer =>
__attr__id => 1329
avatar => 'default.jpg'
login => 'RichardPeter'
review-count => 11
user-dir => 'user_files/'
short-body => 'After a huge disappointment we had with the apartment Frank, Joe and I decided to go see the new movie “Drag Me To Hell.” They had seen it before me but they were willing to see it again… they apparently liked it. Here is what I thought: For a Sam and Ivan Raimi flick, it was pretty cool!!!! I was very surprised to see that there were so many great...'
teaser => 'It was pretty cool!!!!'
title => 'Drag Me to Hell'
type-id => 6
8 =>
__attr__id => 471
__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;I remember seeing the previews for this film a while back and thinking that it would be one of the best films of the year, well, it was a pretty damn good movie but I would not call it the best movie. It was a pretty good movie but goddamn was it confusing. From what I can gather, the film was about a group of people who get into a hospital elevator only be taken to a parallel universe type place where time has stopped, different floors are on different times and the whole place is inhabited by monsters. The film focuses on a young autistic girl who provides the key to their escape. There are a number of things I liked about this movie but there was one big flaw in it that I had a huge problem with.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The one thing that I noticed right away when I was watching this was the dark fantasy-like setting these characters were trapped in. At first, everything was sterile, bright and white but then things get dark and gloomy and it looks like a dungeon. I really enjoyed the set design as well as the lighting on this movie. It really brought a threatening unpromising atmosphere for the movie. In fact, the whole world is kind of ironic considering a hospital is a very clean and friendly place whereas this film takes that idea and dirties it up. It worked very well with the movie. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;When I first saw the monster (before I knew there were multiple monsters) I thought that it was going to be one of those movies where you see it’s just a guy in a zipper suit, but that’s not that case… the monsters in this movie were very well designed, they were original and they pulled it off brilliantly. Each monster has a different way of introducing himself and I really enjoyed how each of them did it. The monsters were actually pretty scary looking, and they had a medieval-rocker look to them that made them stand out from your classic undressed, reptilian or amphibian monster… something that I really enjoyed about this film.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I was expecting this movie to have really bad acting, because every other thing was really good but I was wrong… it had pretty decent acting. The only thing that I wished it had was a bit more chemistry between the characters and on that note, I really wished the relationship between Ben and Sarah would have developed a little more. It seems like this movie should have a little more character development but I am not going to get hung up on that.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;There were a few scares and I did jump out a bit, which is very hard for me to do nowadays but I did. Although, the one thing that really took me out of the movie was how confusing this movie can get. The whole thing takes place in different times but the same place and the whole reason why those monsters are even there gets obscured because of all the shit that is happening. I think this film wants to be smart but it does get very confusing and it backfires on them. At the end of the film I could not help but ask, “what the fuck happened?” because it was so puzzling. That is my ONLY complaint about this movie… is that it could have been thought out a little better. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;So looking back on it, it was a really good film and it had some really good aspects to it… a surprise hit for me considering my expectations. The overall production of this movie was well made and well thought of aside from a few minor complaints and a confusing plot. As a horror fan, I loved it and I strongly recommend that if you enjoy good indie horror, you’ll really enjoy this movie too!&lt;/p&gt;'
alias => 'dark_floors'
dt-publish => '8 years ago'
genre =>
__attr__id => 7
name => 'Horror'
logo => 'logo.jpg'
movie =>
__attr__id => 361
cover => 'cover.jpg'
title => 'Dark Floors'
rating => 0
reviewer =>
__attr__id => 1329
avatar => 'default.jpg'
login => 'RichardPeter'
review-count => 11
user-dir => 'user_files/'
short-body => 'I remember seeing the previews for this film a while back and thinking that it would be one of the best films of the year, well, it was a pretty damn good movie but I would not call it the best movie. It was a pretty good movie but goddamn was it confusing. From what I can gather, the film was about a group of people who get into a hospital elevator...'
teaser => 'It could have been thought out a little better.'
title => 'Dark Floors'
type-id => 6
9 =>
__attr__id => 467
__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;So I recently had the pleasure of watching a movie called Cockhammer by Hack Movies and after seeing the movie all I can say is: “What the fuck did I just watch?” To begin to describe what I saw on my computer is like trying to explain what a tesseract is and it’s going to make it hard to review this movie but I will try to do it anyway. From what plot that I can gather it’s these two stoner friends who must save their girlfriends after they were kidnapped by these henchmen after trying to score some weed so that they can be sacrificed by a severely obsessive compulsive ex pornographer so that he can become a demon and enter the Nether Realm. Whew.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Let me start off by talking about something that I noticed right off the bat and something that really worked for this movie and that is the dialogue. The dialogue was brilliant for such a movie and it borderlined on the swift long drawn out conversations of Quentin Tarantino and the sick perverseness of John Waters. I can’t really quote this movie but what I can say is that I have never heard of so many different descriptive phrases of anal sex, dicks and asses. To just listen to the characters talk in general was a huge treat.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Now, let’s talk about the gore and blood and the effects. For such a low brow movie Cockhammer had some great bloody effects and during the scene where the transvestite demons were disemboweling somebody, I believe the “intestines” were just plastic wrap but it looks so real; proving that with a little imagination anything is possible. The makeup was also pretty good for a movie of this status… the demons were beautifully dressed up and Cockhammer demons was the icing on the cake. It’s a true spectacle to see what you can do with a few bucks and an image in mind.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I can’t complain about the acting or the production value because I excuse it for being such an indie movie… and acting, was okay and I think that it was intentionally supposed to be a little off since everything else was. The characters are funny and laughable and in some psychotic way you feel for the characters because all they want is to get anally fucked by their girlfriends. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;It’s easy to see that this movie was heavily inspired by Troma pictures because of its goriness, humor, controversial and obscure sequences and it is probably one of the most dark, humorous, pornographic gorefests of a movie that I have ever seen. I can’t describe what I saw because it was everywhere and it’s the epitome of the phrase ‘What the fuck?’ it was raunchy and it was demented! I felt like I was violated in the most private of cinematic places and it felt good. I can only recommend this movie to fans of horror comedy, grindhouse, exploitation and even those porn hounds because this is a thrill ride for only a select group of people. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;You can order your copy of Cockhammer at Hack Movies &lt;a href=&quot;http://www.hackmovies.com/movies.html&quot;&gt;here&lt;/a&gt;.&lt;/p&gt;'
alias => 'cockhammer'
dt-publish => '8 years ago'
genre =>
__attr__id => 7
name => 'Horror'
logo => 'logo.jpg'
movie =>
__attr__id => 358
cover => 'cover.jpg'
title => 'Cockhammer'
rating => 0
reviewer =>
__attr__id => 1329
avatar => 'default.jpg'
login => 'RichardPeter'
review-count => 11
user-dir => 'user_files/'
short-body => 'So I recently had the pleasure of watching a movie called Cockhammer by Hack Movies and after seeing the movie all I can say is: “What the fuck did I just watch?” To begin to describe what I saw on my computer is like trying to explain what a tesseract is and it’s going to make it hard to review this movie but I will try to do it anyway. From what ...'
teaser => 'One of the most dark, humorous, pornographic gorefests... I have ever seen.'
title => 'Cockhammer'
type-id => 6
rss-link => 'reviews/dvd/?'
search-string => ''
rss => 'http://www.filmnet.com/rss/reviews/dvd/?'
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userFiles => 'http://i.filmnet.com/user_files/'
videoFiles => 'http://i.filmnet.com/video_files/'

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  36. [0.22 ms] SELECT `users`.* FROM `users` WHERE (user_id='1329')
  37. [0.12 ms] SELECT `rg`.* FROM `review_genres` AS `rg` WHERE (genre_id = '7')
  38. [9.16 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `r`.*, `vr`.`video_id`, `cr`.`channel_id`, `ur`.`user_id`, `mr`.`movie_id` FROM `reviews` AS `r` LEFT JOIN `video__reviews` AS `vr` ON vr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `channel__reviews` AS `cr` ON cr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `user__reviews` AS `ur` ON ur.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `movie__reviews` AS `mr` ON mr.review_id = r.review_id WHERE (1 AND r.`reviewer_id` = 1329 AND r.is_published_review = 1 AND r.is_deleted_review = 0) ORDER BY `r`.`dt_published_review` DESC
  39. [0.16 ms] SELECT `m`.* FROM `movies` AS `m` WHERE (movie_id = '361')
  40. [0.17 ms] SELECT `users`.* FROM `users` WHERE (user_id='1329')
  41. [0.1 ms] SELECT `rg`.* FROM `review_genres` AS `rg` WHERE (genre_id = '7')
  42. [1.04 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `r`.*, `vr`.`video_id`, `cr`.`channel_id`, `ur`.`user_id`, `mr`.`movie_id` FROM `reviews` AS `r` LEFT JOIN `video__reviews` AS `vr` ON vr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `channel__reviews` AS `cr` ON cr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `user__reviews` AS `ur` ON ur.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `movie__reviews` AS `mr` ON mr.review_id = r.review_id WHERE (1 AND r.`reviewer_id` = 1329 AND r.is_published_review = 1 AND r.is_deleted_review = 0) ORDER BY `r`.`dt_published_review` DESC
  43. [0.16 ms] SELECT `m`.* FROM `movies` AS `m` WHERE (movie_id = '358')
  44. [0.56 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `rg`.* FROM `review_genres` AS `rg` LEFT JOIN `reviews` AS `r` ON rg.`genre_id` = r.`genre_id` WHERE (1 AND r.`review_type_id` = 6 AND r.`is_published_review` = 1 AND r.`is_deleted_review` = 0) ORDER BY `rg`.`genre_name` ASC

File Information

146 Files Included
Total Size: 1495.1K
Basepath: /mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/settings/../../../

Application Files

/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/Bootstrap.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/channels/models/Channels.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/default/models/Assistant.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/default/models/Filters.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/reviews/controllers/ReviewsController.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/reviews/models/Movies.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/reviews/models/ReviewGenres.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/reviews/models/Reviews.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/users/models/Users.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/videos/models/Videos.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/settings/config.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/system/acl.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/system/routes.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/Controller/Plugin/Acl.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/Controller/Plugin/AjaxCheck.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/Controller/Plugin/AutoLogin.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/Controller/Plugin/FlashMessenger.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/Controller/Plugin/InmailMessageCount.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/Paginator/Adapter/DbSelect.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/View/Serializer.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/View/Xslt.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/www/index.php

Zend Library Files

/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Assert/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Exception.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Resource.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Resource/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Role.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Role/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Role/Registry.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Role/Registry/Exception.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Auth.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Auth/Storage/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Auth/Storage/Session.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Cache.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Cache/Backend.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Cache/Backend/ExtendedInterface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Cache/Backend/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Cache/Backend/Memcached.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Cache/Core.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Config.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action/Helper/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action/Helper/FlashMessenger.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action/Helper/ViewRenderer.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action/HelperBroker.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action/HelperBroker/PriorityStack.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Dispatcher/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Dispatcher/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Dispatcher/Standard.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Exception.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Front.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Plugin/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Plugin/Broker.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Plugin/ErrorHandler.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Request/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Request/Http.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Response/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Response/Http.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Rewrite.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Route.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Route/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Route/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Route/Module.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Route/Regex.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Adapter/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Adapter/Pdo/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Adapter/Pdo/Mysql.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Expr.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Profiler.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Profiler/Query.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Select.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Statement.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Statement/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Statement/Pdo.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Table/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Exception.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Inflector.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/PregReplace.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/StringToLower.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Word/CamelCaseToDash.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Word/CamelCaseToSeparator.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Word/Separator/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Word/SeparatorToSeparator.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Word/UnderscoreToSeparator.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Form.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Json.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Json/Expr.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Loader.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Loader/Autoloader.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Loader/PluginLoader.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Loader/PluginLoader/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Locale.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Locale/Data/Translation.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Filter/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Filter/Priority.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Formatter/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Formatter/Simple.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Writer/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Writer/Stream.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Paginator.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Paginator/Adapter/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Paginator/ScrollingStyle/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Paginator/ScrollingStyle/Jumping.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Registry.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Session.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Session/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Session/Exception.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Session/Namespace.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Session/SaveHandler/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Translate.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Translate/Adapter.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Translate/Adapter/Gettext.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Uri.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Validate/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Version.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/HeadMeta.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/HeadTitle.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Placeholder/Container.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Placeholder/Container/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Placeholder/Container/Standalone.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Placeholder/Registry.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Interface.php

ZFDebug Library Files

/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Database.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Exception.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/File.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Html.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Memory.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Registry.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Text.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Time.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Variables.php

Memory Usage

Controller: 5463K

Custom Timers

Controller: 305.92 ms

Overall Timers

reviews
reviews
list
Avg: 1093.91 ms / 1 requests
Min: 1093.91 ms
Max: 1093.91 ms

Reset timers by sending ZFDEBUG_RESET as a GET/POST parameter

Registered Instances

Zend_View_Helper_Placeholder_Registry => Zend_View_Helper_Placeholder_Registry Object()
acl => Zend_Acl Object()
baseDir => 'http://www.filmnet.com/'
cache => Zend_Cache_Core Object()
config => Zend_Config Object()
db => Zend_Db_Adapter_Pdo_Mysql Object()
translator => Zend_Translate Object()
copyright 1.8.0/5.2.10-2ubuntu6variables Variableshtml HTMLdatabase 44 in 128.71 msfile 146 Filesmemory 15458K of 1024Mtime 1093.91 msregistry Registry (7)«