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Horror: Recently Added
1-10 of 16

And they call Eli Roth callous?

The FINAL DESTINATION franchise - never the most noble series (the first is the only worthwhile film, just) - hits what is thus far its low point in the David R. Ellis-directed THE FINAL DESTINATION. Further proving that the 3D bandwagon is not one in which directors hop on for the purposes of good filmmaking, this redundant continuation of the ...

Read more

Review by: TomElce

Added: 8 years ago

 

I realised I had gone through 90 minutes of horror without feeling any tension or fright.

On occasion, I do like to borrow a mindless movie about zombies/mutants who wreak death and destruction on the world, and I got exactly what I asked for – the mindless bit. The year is somewhere in the future, on some distant planet where a mysterious machine hidden beneath the earth is converting the dead and dying into killer zombies. Throw into...

Read more

Review by: TimVoon

Added: 8 years ago

For present-day horror movies, "Trick 'r Treat" is a shot in the arm.

It's with a palpable autumnal atmosphere, seamlessly interlocking screenwriting, superlative cinematography and a regular upending of expectations that Michael Dougherty's "Trick'r Treat," a Halloween-set horror anthology in the spirit of George A. Romero's classic "Creepshow," qualifies as the year's strongest horror movie. First and foremost, ...

Read more

Review by: TomElce

Added: 8 years ago

 

Orphan

Genre: Horror

The year’s most laughably overwrought horror hit.

If you see only one movie in which Vera Farmiga plays the distressed mother of a creepy child, see JOSHUA. A diabolical little SOB with the mind of a little-league Hannibal Lecter, Joshua kicks the crap out of Esther, the precocious little twerp at the center of ORPHAN. Lacking the earlier film’s wit, style and psychological acuity, this is the year...

Read more

Review by: MiamiMovieCritic

Added: 8 years ago

Genuinely unsettling and authentically unforgettable.

After years of going out of my way to avoid it, I finally got up the nerve to watch Takashi Miike’s infamous 1999 horror film, AUDITION. My excuses for not seeing it were a) life is too short, and b) it sounded like something that would give me post-traumatic stress disorder. I decided to take the plunge when Quentin Tarantino named it one of the 20...

Read more

Review by: MiamiMovieCritic

Added: 8 years ago

 

An unoriginal but thoroughly refreshing horror.

"It's fucking nuts! I know that." Such is a line of dialogue spoken in Patrick Lussier's My Bloody Valentine revamp and such is a fitting description of the movie itself. Humorously fun in a way that the recent, piss-poor Friday the 13th retread can only ever hope to be, director Lussier's slasher throwback embraces drama-as-parody while diving ...

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Review by: TomElce

Added: 8 years ago

This year's authentic must-see horror.

The first legitimately frightening cinematic experience of the year, The Last House on the Left ditches the goofball comedy elements of its namesake predecessor while embracing that film's bleak viciousness. Following the same plot trajectory -- two teenage girls (Sara Paxton and Martha MacIsaac) come into contact with a gang of dirtbag criminals, ...

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Review by: TomElce

Added: 8 years ago

 

Martyrs is one part potential great, one part lumbering dud.

Martyrs begins with the same visceral punch of Alexandre Aja's Haute Tension only to eventually descend to the mediocre level of Hostel, crippled by convolutions and unnecessary over-explanation. What essentially begins as, and remains for the first 45 minutes, a nifty little horror exercise collapses the more writer-director Pascal Laugier ...

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Review by: TomElce

Added: 8 years ago

Everything that happens had a much greater impact in the original.

Don’t do drugs. Or else you’ll end up stabbed, raped and bleeding to death in the woods. That seems to be the message of The Last House on the Left, the slick new remake of Wes Craven’s shocking directorial debut. While horror movies of the ‘70s had a gnarly soul about them – Craven’s original was commenting on the orgy of violence America ...

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Review by: MiamiMovieCritic

Added: 8 years ago

 

It was pretty cool!!!!

After a huge disappointment we had with the apartment Frank, Joe and I decided to go see the new movie “Drag Me To Hell.” They had seen it before me but they were willing to see it again… they apparently liked it. Here is what I thought: For a Sam and Ivan Raimi flick, it was pretty cool!!!! I was very surprised to see that there were so many great...

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Review by: RichardPeter

Added: 8 years ago

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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;The FINAL DESTINATION franchise - never the most noble series (the first is the only worthwhile film, just) - hits what is thus far its low point in the David R. Ellis-directed THE FINAL DESTINATION. Further proving that the 3D bandwagon is not one in which directors hop on for the purposes of good filmmaking, this redundant continuation of the franchise trades in the same redundant, meticulously telegraphed set-pieces of its predecessors while continuing to fit the franchise bill of having approximately zero soul. To make things worse, the acting this time is as dreadful as it's ever been, simple conversations in cafes and shopping centers here turned into the very representation of what we may all a cine-faceplant.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;A laughably contrived pile-up-cum-gruefest-cum-collapse at a speedway venue is that which is prophesized by lead protagonist Nick O'Bannon (Bobby Campo, a poor man's Justin Chatwin), Nick naturally uprooting himself, his friends and a few other third wheels so that they miss out on the fun of the film's hollow opening twelve. Naturally, death's not done with these nincompoops, following them to swimming pools, car washes and hospitals in the name of elaborate death sequences, though the only stand-out sequence here is one of a near-death in the aforementioned car wash. Everything else is so rigorously, eye-rollingly built upon before ahead of time that even the most callous viewers won't be able to take sick pleasure from the grim demises on show. The only death that isn't signaled fifteen miles off is one that arrives as a bad joke, a character daring to talk of deja vu and promptly getting struck down.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;For his part, David R. Ellis (of another entry in the series, the mediocre FINAL DESTINATION 2) directs with something approaching assurance, yet even then its woefully misplaced assurance. Ellis's filmography stands as that of a schlockmeister not a filmmaker but the prize for hack of the entire production should be bestowed upon screenwriter Eric Bress, who doesn't so much craft a thoughtful or existential plot with a beginning, middle and end so much as he cobbles together a bunch of rote concepts that either bask in unoriginality (a stone flying through the air and taking someone's eye out? How quaint.) or obnoxiously reflect the very movie's existence (as in a last act revelatory collection of deaths in a theatre), all while molding characters who are pretty much all-around jackasses. The FINAL DESTINATION movies have never made for profound horror-themed entertainment, but they've seldom been as insufferable and bereft of soul as this trash. And they call Eli Roth callous?&lt;/p&gt;'
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short-body => 'The FINAL DESTINATION franchise - never the most noble series (the first is the only worthwhile film, just) - hits what is thus far its low point in the David R. Ellis-directed THE FINAL DESTINATION. Further proving that the 3D bandwagon is not one in which directors hop on for the purposes of good filmmaking, this redundant continuation of the ...'
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;On occasion, I do like to borrow a mindless movie about zombies/mutants who wreak death and destruction on the world, and I got exactly what I asked for – the mindless bit. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The year is somewhere in the future, on some distant planet where a mysterious machine hidden beneath the earth is converting the dead and dying into killer zombies. Throw into this kung fu, a mysterious cult that believes in a saviour who will come and save humanity by destroying the machine and John Malkovich and you will get a strange brew of zombie bodies. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Did I really understand what was going on? Not really. Did it really matter? Not really. It is after all a mutant zombie movie and things don’t really have to make sense as long as the body count keeps mounting. The surroundings of this science fiction world are computer generated, similar to what was seen in SIN CITY and THE SPIRIT. However, the quality of the CGI is inferior and the artificial look is detrimental to the quality of the movie. There is plenty of gore as expected: bodies being pierced by sharp objects, heads being decapitated. In fact the only moments of bright colour come from the bountiful splashes of blood thrown on screen. Otherwise, everything else is a haze of greys. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The movie begins in the trenches of a fierce battle. The first impression is that one is in the trenches of the western front of the First World War. Before long we have zombies amassing the field slaughtering men like chickens at a processing plant. Confused? I was. Then the movie flips to the near future and we have fighter monks (Ron Perlman) recruiting battled hardened soldiers (Thomas Jane) to fulfil a prophecy about saving humanity by destroying the zombie mutant machine. John Malkovich has a brief moment citing some lines before he is quickly killed off by the mutants. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I think this movie fails not just in the CGI quality department but also in the storyline and tension department. I realised somewhere in the middle of the movie – after a few hundred thousand people had been wiped out by this plague – that I wasn’t feeling any excitement or worry. I was on edge of my seat in the first 5 minutes of 28 DAYS LATER, which is a gold standard for zombie movies in my book. In fact I was busy looking at the clock and ended up reading the paper as innocent people were being slaughtered.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Somewhere in the middle of the religious mumbo jumbo and kung fu fighting, and Thomas Jane being converted into a half mutant my interested picked up towards the end. At least there was a satisfactory explanation to the chaos, but I realised I had gone through 90 minutes of horror without feeling any tension or fright for that matter. Fail.&lt;/p&gt;'
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short-body => 'On occasion, I do like to borrow a mindless movie about zombies/mutants who wreak death and destruction on the world, and I got exactly what I asked for – the mindless bit. The year is somewhere in the future, on some distant planet where a mysterious machine hidden beneath the earth is converting the dead and dying into killer zombies. Throw into...'
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;It's with a palpable autumnal atmosphere, seamlessly interlocking screenwriting, superlative cinematography and a regular upending of expectations that Michael Dougherty's &amp;quot;Trick'r Treat,&amp;quot; a Halloween-set horror anthology in the spirit of George A. Romero's classic &amp;quot;Creepshow,&amp;quot; qualifies as the year's strongest horror movie. First and foremost, Dougherty's debut feature-length film understands its chosen holiday as the time when horror legend comes to life, embracing the appeal and spirit of Halloween as all the interlocking segments unravel.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt; &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Arriving tragically onto DVD in a time and age where witless and incompetent kiddie-friendly remakes and lugubrious &amp;quot;Saw&amp;quot; sequels plague our multiplexes, &amp;quot;Trick 'r Treat&amp;quot; is a welcome respite from the disenchantment regularly being inspired within the horror genre, reveling in all the bloodshed and classical horror moments brought forth by each individual segment, both evoking the look and feel of the holiday like no horror film since John Carpenter's original &amp;quot;Halloween&amp;quot; while seeming to be boosted by an ever-present wit and humor not so seamlessly mixed in with such atmospheric storytelling since Wes Craven's first &amp;quot;Scream&amp;quot; movie. Like those films, &amp;quot;Trick 'r Treat&amp;quot; is a shot-in-the-arm, deserving of far more than its haphazard distributor treatment, which has seen it debuted onto DVD when the cinematography alone practically begs to be seen in multiplexes.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Made up of four segments that all take place in the same town on the same spooky Halloween night, &amp;quot;Trick 'r Treat&amp;quot; links each through recurring characters and sly twists of plot. After a prologue has seen someone not behaving in the spirit of the night get gruesomely dispatched, attention turns to Charlie (Brett Kelly), a gluttonous kid whose attempts to steal candy from the home of school principal Steven (Dylan Baker) are thwarted by the man himself who, as it turns out, also happens to be a serial killer. Introduced next but completed as other stories unfold alongside it comes a spin on &amp;quot;The Little Red Riding Hood,&amp;quot; wherein twenty-two year-old Laurie (Anna Paquin) is pushed by her sister, friends and tradition itself to find a date so that she may lose her virginity. Kitted out in a red hood, she naturally comes across a wolf as she treks through some woodlands. Elsewhere, kid trick-or-treaters Marcy (Britt McKillipp), Schrader (Jean-Luc Bilodeau), Chip (Alberto Ghisi) and Sara (Isabelle Deluce) take out-of-the-ordinary classmate Rhonda (Samm Todd) to a location where a mass murder is said to have occurred. Last of all comes the story that pits the film's mascot, the burlap sack-masked Sam, against the crotchety and bitter Mr. Kreeg (Brian Cox).&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Best of all these segments is the kids' investigation of the site of a bus crash that purportedly claimed the lives of several mentally disturbed kids. At once the most mesmerically-lensed sequence of the cinematic year, their journey to and experiences at the destination is magnificently shot (by director of photography Glen MacPherson) and choreographed, bringing to mind &amp;quot;It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown!&amp;quot; in their walk to the location and a more refined version of television's defunct &amp;quot;Are You Afraid of the Dark?&amp;quot; as Marcy tells her grim story to her peers. Though the sequence evolves into something of a trick being played on misfit Ronda, wonderfully played by Samm Todd, there's a ceaseless expectation in the mind of the viewer that Dougherty obligingly delivers upon. A feast for the eyes and mind, this segment's the one that most notably brings to mind the until-now best horror anthology &amp;quot;Creepshow,&amp;quot; and that most definitely asserts this film's standing as the most techically accomplished horror this year. The use of fog that entrenches the whole lakeside setting, meanwhile, doesn't call negative attention to itself and instead adds further memorable atmosphere to the story. All the other sequences are great, too, but this is the one I could watch more times than any of them.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt; &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;If a mistake comes at any point in &amp;quot;Trick 'r Treat&amp;quot; it is in the decision to have mascot Sam briefly unmasked during the closing segment in which he harasses and attacks Brian Cox's grumpy old man. Unnecessary in a sequence that already has enough spook factor to not warrant a silly attempt at shock-horror, the sight of his predictably inhuman face adds nothing of merit to the sequence and, furthermore, isn't as overtly threatening as when the child-sized Sam is masked. Besides this misstep, this part of the film exists at the same general height as the preceding storylines, Brian Cox standing out amongst the cast and delivering an effective, if constrained, performance. As with all the other tales on show, it closes with another devilish turn of events.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Primarily &amp;quot;Trick 'r Treat&amp;quot; exists as a delectable little film, kept to a concise 80 minutes leaving little room for loose skin and superfluous nothingness, that succeeds both at delivering upon and upending audience expectations. The spin on &amp;quot;Little Red Riding Hood&amp;quot; brings to mind 2000's standout &amp;quot;Ginger Snaps&amp;quot; in its subversion from the initial tale that inspired it, while the opening sequence boasts besides Dylan Baker's gleefully horrid portrayal of a deranged father and authority figure a perverse twist that exemplifies the film's no-holds-barred approach to gore and themes. In a world where studios might have cared about giving wide audiences quality entertainment over the same old repetitive garbage, the brazenly-realized &amp;quot;Trick 'r Treat&amp;quot; might have been placed into the October cinematic market where it could have provided superior competition to all that &amp;quot;Saw&amp;quot; flatulence and where its technical triumphs and intricate storytelling could have been appreciated on the big screen. As is, you'll just have to content yourselves with loving it on the smaller one.&lt;/p&gt;'
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short-body => 'It's with a palpable autumnal atmosphere, seamlessly interlocking screenwriting, superlative cinematography and a regular upending of expectations that Michael Dougherty's "Trick'r Treat," a Halloween-set horror anthology in the spirit of George A. Romero's classic "Creepshow," qualifies as the year's strongest horror movie. First and foremost, ...'
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;If you see only one movie in which Vera Farmiga plays the distressed mother of a creepy child, see JOSHUA. A diabolical little SOB with the mind of a little-league Hannibal Lecter, Joshua kicks the crap out of Esther, the precocious little twerp at the center of ORPHAN. Lacking the earlier film’s wit, style and psychological acuity, this is the year’s most laughably overwrought horror hit.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;So offensive in its depiction of orphans that the DVD comes with a disclaimer, ORPHAN is about little Esther (Isabelle Fuhrman), a 9-year-old Russian loner who initially wins the hearts of a happily married couple named Kate (Varmiga) and John (Peter Sarsgaard). They welcome Esther into their family, which includes two biological children. (A third child was lost during pregnancy, a tragedy that’s explained in a frightening dream sequence that’s by far the most effective thing in the movie.) But soon accidents start to happen, people go missing, blah-blah-blah. It all builds to the most ridiculous twist ending since M. Night Shyamalan’s THE VILLAGE.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Varmiga and Sarsgaard deserve better, or maybe they don’t since they chose to do this movie. In addition to JOSHUA, I’d recommend a dozen creepy-kid movies before this one – including THE GOOD SON and the original OMEN movie with Gregory Peck. And if you’re the adventurous type, you should check out 1961’s THE INNOCENTS. Co-written by Truman Capote, it’s perhaps the best horror movie of its kind.&lt;/p&gt;'
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short-body => 'If you see only one movie in which Vera Farmiga plays the distressed mother of a creepy child, see JOSHUA. A diabolical little SOB with the mind of a little-league Hannibal Lecter, Joshua kicks the crap out of Esther, the precocious little twerp at the center of ORPHAN. Lacking the earlier film’s wit, style and psychological acuity, this is the year...'
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;After years of going out of my way to avoid it, I finally got up the nerve to watch Takashi Miike’s infamous 1999 horror film, AUDITION. My excuses for not seeing it were a) life is too short, and b) it sounded like something that would give me post-traumatic stress disorder. I decided to take the plunge when Quentin Tarantino named it one of the 20 greatest films released since 1992. Plus, the movie is available to watch instantly on Netflix, so I figured no harm, no foul if I decided to switch it off after 15 minutes. Having seen the whole thing (well, the parts where I didn’t have my eyes shut anyway), I can’t say I agree with QT. But the movie is genuinely unsettling and authentically unforgettable.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The relatively serious, even romantic first hour could be viewed as the sickest black comedy ever. It’s about a widower named Shigeharu (Ryo Ishibashi). His teenage son (Tetsu Sawaki) says he looks dispirited and suggests he remarry. Shigeharu complains about the difficulty of finding a mate: “I wish there was some nice girl hiding somewhere.” Given what’s in store for this guy, it’s a bitterly funny line.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Shigeharu is friends with a movie producer (Jun Kunimura), who comes up with an ethically shaky idea: They’ll hold an audition, but instead of auditioning for a movie role, the actresses will audition to be Shigeharu’s love interest. Shigeharu is immediately taken with Asami (Eihi Shiina), a soft-spoken, submissive and much younger woman whose dreams of becoming a ballet star were shattered when she suffered a devastating accident at the age of 18. Not everything she says at the audition adds up, and the producer friend becomes suspicious. But Shigeharu falls for her too quickly to realize that not everything is what it seems.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Miike has a reputation for pushing the envelope and going to extremes, but what really sets him apart are his stylistic flourishes. Those were what made ICHI THE KILLER the best manga movie to date, and they’re on full display in AUDITION. I’ll never forget the moment when Miike pulls the rug out from under us (it involves a body rolling over in a bag.) Or the amazing pre-finale sequence that slips, almost imperceptibly, into the realm of the unreal.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Some critics have said the movie lacks a theme, but I disagree. The first hour is a definitive statement on the ways in which love makes us blind. Given Shigeharu’s culpability in the audition scheme, what happens to him could be viewed as a feminist revenge tale. But, at its dark heart, I think the movie is about the irreparable harm of child abuse. Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned, especially one who’s been robbed of her humanity.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;So what actually happens in the film’s notorious finale? Surprisingly little. There are three acts of sadism – involving a doggie bowl, needles and a length of piano wire – that are hard to watch and even harder to stomach. Still, the movie has a relatively low body count. Like Tarantino’s RESERVOIR DOGS, Miike’s film proves that it’s not the amount of violence but the way in which the violence is presented that determines what impact it will have on the audience. I’m not the first to say this, but this is a filmmaker who’s so good at what he does he’s almost dangerous.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;AUDITION was recently re-released on DVD – and released for the first time on Blu-Ray – in a ten year anniversary edition.&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;'
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;&amp;quot;It's fucking nuts! I know that.&amp;quot; Such is a line of dialogue spoken in Patrick Lussier's My Bloody Valentine revamp and such is a fitting description of the movie itself. Humorously fun in a way that the recent, piss-poor Friday the 13th retread can only ever hope to be, director Lussier's slasher throwback embraces drama-as-parody while diving gleefully headfirst into uncompromisingly gruesome territory. From its opening massacre -- of which the sight of an eyeball bulging from the socket suggests better use of the tactics employed by 2006's abysmal Black Christmas (as well as summing up the film's general &amp;quot;who gives a shit&amp;quot; attitude towards the 3D technology it employs) -- through all that follows, My Bloody Valentine exists as a darkly humorous entry into the post-Millenium crowd of slash-horror remakes -- and a far better one than 2008's dreadful Prom Night at that.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;For fans of the genre peeved that the Hollywood remake craze has often missed out the blood and guts once quintessential for the '80s golden age, Lussier indulges in the exploitative goods as much as can be expected. A dwarf, a perverted truck driver and a hot naked chick all feature in the movie's succession of unfortunate victims, here being struck off by the thought-to-be-dead psychopath miner Harry Warden (Richard John Waters), returning with trusty pickaxe in hand right around the same time as Tom Hanniger (Jensen Ackles), a survivor of Harry's original massacre, returns to town following a ten-year exile. Devoid of scares and lacking in suspense though My Bloody Valentine often is, it nonetheless qualifies as one of the more fun and adventurous films among the recent crowd of similarly-ilked films, an unoriginal but thoroughly refreshing dash through territory so often unendearing.&lt;/p&gt;'
alias => 'my_bloody_valentine'
dt-publish => '8 years ago'
genre =>
__attr__id => 7
name => 'Horror'
logo => 'logo.jpg'
movie =>
__attr__id => 388
cover => 'cover.jpg'
title => 'My Bloody Valentine'
rating => 60
reviewer =>
__attr__id => 1341
avatar => 'TomElce_1265322658.png'
login => 'TomElce'
review-count => 27
user-dir => 'user_files/'
short-body => '"It's fucking nuts! I know that." Such is a line of dialogue spoken in Patrick Lussier's My Bloody Valentine revamp and such is a fitting description of the movie itself. Humorously fun in a way that the recent, piss-poor Friday the 13th retread can only ever hope to be, director Lussier's slasher throwback embraces drama-as-parody while diving ...'
teaser => 'An unoriginal but thoroughly refreshing horror.'
title => 'My Bloody Valentine'
type-id => 6
6 =>
__attr__id => 512
__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;The first legitimately frightening cinematic experience of the year, The Last House on the Left ditches the goofball comedy elements of its namesake predecessor while embracing that film's bleak viciousness. Following the same plot trajectory -- two teenage girls (Sara Paxton and Martha MacIsaac) come into contact with a gang of dirtbag criminals, are subsequently raped and (in one case) murdered by them, with the villains afterwards heading unknowingly to the lake home of Paxton's Mari and her parents (Monica Potter and Tony Goldwyn) -- this new film boasts significantly higher production values and more concise screenwriting than Wes Craven's 1972 schlocker, which itself borrowed extensively from Bergman's Virgin Spring. Writers Adam Alleca and Carl Ellsworth, as well as inexperienced director Dennis Iliadis, may trade in easy-to-box cinematic character types, but they also trade in breathtakingly atmospheric tension peppered with the same nihilistic violence that finds the films of Rob Zombie (The Devil's Rejects, Halloween) being overlooked. The apparent cruelty and voyeurism with which the movie's proceedings unfold offset by more moral complexity than one finds in watered-down J-horror remakes and a poignant sense of tragedy too often absent in the genre, The Last House on the Left makes for one of the most surprising, multi-layered and, indeed, best films of the year.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;If one thought it impossible for The Last House on the Left to prove more shocking and audience-diving than its '70s counterpart, Dennis Iliadis makes sure to push the envelope, expanding both on the original film's themes and increasing the general unpleasantness of the violence. The violence is often explicit, the film opening with a cruel double homicide in which lead villain Krug (an excellent Garret Dillahunt) taunts one of his cop victims with a photograph of his children upon which his blood drips, then moving on to the unnerving extended woodlands sequence in which Mari and Paige (MacIsaac) are brutally tormented by their captors -- Krug's bitter girlfriend Sadie (Riki Lindholme), brother Francis (Aaron Paul) and Krug's unwilling son Justin (Spencer Treak Clark). By refusing to shy away from the horrific rape and violence that transpires, Iliadis puts into perspective what later follows once the group arrive at the home of Mari's parents. Lest anyone suspect the filmmakers have no knack for creating intense unease out of anything other than explicit violence, the segment is broken up by numerous standout shots, cinematographer Sharone Meir capturing the surroundings eerily, especially in between-screaming interludes, where moments of would-be peaceful tranquility have been transformed into quiet horror -- much as Meir herself achieved in 2004's hugely affecting Mean Creek.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Once action switches to the lakeside getaway of Mari's schoolteacher mother and doctor father, The Last House on the Left takes another rejuvenating turn. With the knowledge of their daughter's ordeal steadily coming to their attention, Emma and John Collingwood are forced to make a decision on how to deal with the people they unwittingly allowed to stay in their guest home. With help miles away, they choose retaliation against Krug and company, the result being that the tables are turned on the antagonists, Last House on the Left doing away with the gleefulness with which the original parents took these actions thirty-seven years ago and hammering the bleakness of proceedings home. Devoid of humour, the film is a superior retread alternative to this year's recent, more self-aware My Bloody Valentine, equally blood-soaked but more emotionally and technically rewarding.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;When a film's marketing campaign does an incredible disservice by virtually revealing its entire plot before audiences have even seen the opening credits (as the trailers and TV spots for Last House have done), it takes a genuinely excellent motion picture to pull things back. Fortunately, The Last House on the Left qualifies as the best horror movie of the year. It is atmospherically lensed, the scenery -- be it the woods or the lake house -- captured in a manner both doom-laden and aesthetically better than its low-budget sibling (the shot of characters walking down a road as a sign reading &amp;quot;Lake ends in the road&amp;quot; looms overhead is one of the more memorable shots). It avoids the cheap gotcha! tactics so frequently employed by lame teenage slasher films of the day, boasting approximately one superfluous jump scare and zero spontaneous revivals. Finally, the pacing is concise without being rapid or uneven, director Iliadis allowing events to unfold at a natural pace that doesn't cater to the MTV generation and as such puts you right in the moment. Technically proficient, intelligently written and fiercely uncompromising, The Last House on the Left is this year's authentic must-see horror.&lt;/p&gt;'
alias => 'the_last_house_on_the_left_by_tom_elce'
dt-publish => '8 years ago'
genre =>
__attr__id => 7
name => 'Horror'
logo => 'logo.jpg'
movie =>
__attr__id => 379
cover => 'cover.jpg'
title => 'The Last House on the Left'
rating => 80
reviewer =>
__attr__id => 1341
avatar => 'TomElce_1265322658.png'
login => 'TomElce'
review-count => 27
user-dir => 'user_files/'
short-body => 'The first legitimately frightening cinematic experience of the year, The Last House on the Left ditches the goofball comedy elements of its namesake predecessor while embracing that film's bleak viciousness. Following the same plot trajectory -- two teenage girls (Sara Paxton and Martha MacIsaac) come into contact with a gang of dirtbag criminals, ...'
teaser => 'This year's authentic must-see horror.'
title => 'The Last House on the Left'
type-id => 6
7 =>
__attr__id => 503
__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;Martyrs begins with the same visceral punch of Alexandre Aja's Haute Tension only to eventually descend to the mediocre level of Hostel, crippled by convolutions and unnecessary over-explanation. What essentially begins as, and remains for the first 45 minutes, a nifty little horror exercise collapses the more writer-director Pascal Laugier shoehorns in superfluous elements that are actually rather stock to begin with. Had Martyrs continued down the narrower, more personal path it appeared to be heading, the results would have been all the better, effective much in the same way as Greg McLean's underrated Wolf Creek. As is, the movie winds up a series of woefully ineffective torture takes, repetetive long before the closing credits come and not nearly crafted with enough skill to excuse its almost total lack of morality.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;A girl (Mylene Jampanoi) runs into view at the opening of Martyrs, bloody and beaten, the recipient of cruel torture both mental and physical. Deeply scarred and now mentally disturbed, her nights are haunted by the presence-apparent of a dead girl. Fifteen years onwards, the same girl storms into the home of a rich French family and shoots them all with a shotgun, the implication being that the parents of the household were somehow involved with her ordeal. Calling a friend (Morjana Alaoui) who arrives to assist in cleaning up the bloody mess of the home, it becomes quickly clear that their story has yet to come full circle.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Martyrs is one part potential great, one part lumbering dud, totally lacking in depth. The opening 45 minutes are simultaneously disquieting, hectic, grim and brutally affecting. Driven to murder an entire family unit on the basis of thinking she recognises them as her torturers, Jampanoi's Lucie is written as a terminally ill woman horrifically consumed by events that were out of her control. Fearing for her friend's sanity and not anywhere near as sure that Lucie has identified the true culprits, Alaoui's Anna nonetheless comes to her friend's aide as a victim of childhood abuse herself, able to somehow relate to Lucie and sympathise with her on such a deep level that she'll even help her in such awful circumstances. Their bond, though built on tragedy, gives the film its fleeting heart, and a moment where both girls find themselves contemplating the gravity of what they've become involved with is the film's greatest.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;It's a shame, then, that Laugier puts such emphasis on wholly uninteresting ideas during the second half that it robs Martyrs of its effectiveness and calls attention to its decidedly less noble aspects. Without wanting to give anything away, it's necessary to mention that events in the film take a few turns that serve to iron out potential audience grievances and fail miserably. The film's misogyny is explained by a dopey character speech while Laugier attempts to give some egregious justification to the actions of the two female leads by another of his overly convenient narrative turns. With new elements and, indeed, characters thrown suddenly into the mix, Martyrs loses its footing disastrously, meaning that the complete lack of scares previously excused by the film's personal effectiveness serves to become a greater audience annoyance. At the very least, it is fair to expect that Laugier's sub-Saw plot devices might actually lead somewhere... Alas, Martyrs comes to a finish that qualifies as such a non-event it gets you wondering why exactly you ever wasted your time, spent the money or bought into this film's sorely misplaced hype.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;For what it's worth, the acting performances are generally good, while the film's cinematography is better than one might initially expect (again re-calling much of what made Haute Tension such a horror masterpiece) and the gore effects are appropriately stomach-turning. Leads Jampanoi and Alaoui are both fiercely committed to their roles, and live and breathe the motivations and actions taken by their characters, not putting a foot wrong and certainly scoring the film some points. What they cannot do, however, is make up for Martyrs' poorly cobbled-together screenplay, exploitative tone and general pointlessness. A half-competent exercise in gorno it may be, Martyrs is still half-garbage.&lt;/p&gt;'
alias => 'martyrs'
dt-publish => '8 years ago'
genre =>
__attr__id => 7
name => 'Horror'
logo => 'logo.jpg'
movie =>
__attr__id => 381
cover => 'cover.jpg'
title => 'Martyrs'
rating => 40
reviewer =>
__attr__id => 1341
avatar => 'TomElce_1265322658.png'
login => 'TomElce'
review-count => 27
user-dir => 'user_files/'
short-body => 'Martyrs begins with the same visceral punch of Alexandre Aja's Haute Tension only to eventually descend to the mediocre level of Hostel, crippled by convolutions and unnecessary over-explanation. What essentially begins as, and remains for the first 45 minutes, a nifty little horror exercise collapses the more writer-director Pascal Laugier ...'
teaser => 'Martyrs is one part potential great, one part lumbering dud.'
title => 'Martyrs'
type-id => 6
8 =>
__attr__id => 497
__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;Don’t do drugs. Or else you’ll end up stabbed, raped and bleeding to death in the woods.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;That seems to be the message of The Last House on the Left, the slick new remake of Wes Craven’s shocking directorial debut. While horror movies of the ‘70s had a gnarly soul about them – Craven’s original was commenting on the orgy of violence America unleashed on Southeast Asia – the horror remakes of today are products of nothing more than a corporate bottom line. There’s no reference point here; the story is self-contained, and on its own terms only sporadically engaging.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;This is certainly one of the more audacious horror remakes of recent years. The original film depicted (in what felt like real time) the rape and attempted murder of two teenage girls. Is this really the kind of material that can be repackaged for the multiplex crowd? Apparently it is: the remake ruled the box office last March, beating out Zack Snyder’s Watchmen for the top spot.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;One thing the filmmakers get right is the casting of the girls. Sara Paxton (she’s still doing Disney TV shows like “Jonas” and “Wizards of Waverly Place,” for chrissakes!) and Martha MacIsaac (she played the Goldslick vodka-loving girl who Michael Cera wanted to lose his virginity to in Superbad) are about as squeaky clean as it gets. Putting them in harm’s way – and showing what happens to them in graphic, unnerving detail – gives the first half of the film a shuddery impact.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Mari (Paxton) is on vacation with her parents (Tony Goldwyn and Monica Potter) at their summer house in the woods. She borrows the family car and goes to pick up her friend Paige (MacIsaac). The girls meet up with a sullen-looking guy (Spencer Treat Clark), and they all end up going back to his motel room to smoke pot. They’re doomed! Doomed, I tell ya!&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;What happens next would be off-limits in most mainstream movies, but here it plays out in excruciating, extended detail. You might expect something like this to happen in an underground shocker like Gaspar Noé’s Irreversible, but not in a big-budget horror movie marketed to teenagers.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Still, for all of this new film’s disproportionate shock value, everything that happens had a much greater impact in the original. The casting of the gang that terrorizes the girls is the biggest problem. They’re relatively clean-cut, almost attractive. They express some class resentment toward Mari and her parents, but beyond that, it’s difficult to tell who these people are or where they came from. (In Craven’s film, the gang looked and acted like the scum of the earth.) They don’t look all that scary, which makes it easier to remember that none of this is really happening – it’s all being filmed on a movie set. The tagline of the original was: “Keep telling yourself… it’s only a movie!” But you don’t have to do that while watching the 2009 version of Last House on the Left. Certainly not during the improbable last 30 minutes, when Mari’s hapless yuppie parents become unstoppable killing machines.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;This is a movie-movie, one with stunning locations and gorgeous anamorphic widescreen cinematography. But what’s up with that? At the end of the day, what’s the point of a beautifully filmed rape scene, anyway?&lt;/p&gt;'
alias => 'the_last_house_on_the_left'
dt-publish => '8 years ago'
genre =>
__attr__id => 7
name => 'Horror'
logo => 'logo.jpg'
movie =>
__attr__id => 379
cover => 'cover.jpg'
title => 'The Last House on the Left'
rating => 40
reviewer =>
__attr__id => 84
avatar => 'MiamiMovieCritic.jpg'
login => 'MiamiMovieCritic'
review-count => 210
user-dir => 'user_files/'
short-body => 'Don’t do drugs. Or else you’ll end up stabbed, raped and bleeding to death in the woods. That seems to be the message of The Last House on the Left, the slick new remake of Wes Craven’s shocking directorial debut. While horror movies of the ‘70s had a gnarly soul about them – Craven’s original was commenting on the orgy of violence America ...'
teaser => 'Everything that happens had a much greater impact in the original.'
title => 'The Last House on the Left'
type-id => 6
9 =>
__attr__id => 472
__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;After a huge disappointment we had with the apartment Frank, Joe and I decided to go see the new movie “Drag Me To Hell.” They had seen it before me but they were willing to see it again… they apparently liked it. Here is what I thought:&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;For a Sam and Ivan Raimi flick, it was pretty cool!!!! I was very surprised to see that there were so many great ‘jump-out’ scary scenes for a PG-13 and there were some great make-up effects too. There were points where the movie scared the shit out of me and I would jump back or scream out obscenities.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;For those who know the Raimi bros and their unique style of horror, you’d know that there would be some pretty funny moments in any of their horror movies. This movie isn’t an exception. There were several subtle humor points throughout the movie and I really enjoyed the scene with the goat (It’s not that kind of scene) and the scene where the old lady attacks the young woman both alive and dead. There were some points where it was so sick and gross that it was funny. Overall it was pretty scary and pretty funny at the same time.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I am not going to go into a full movie review; it would be way too long to read. What I also found out is that Raimi is making a 4th “Evil Dead” movie as well as an “Evil Dead” remake. Word around the camp fire is that “Drag Me To Hell” is going to be connected with the 4th “Evil Dead” installment. Justin Long’s character, after the end scene, would go to the cabin that he was talking about and there would start the next “ED” movie. Plus, there were several nods to “Evil Dead” in this movie like ancient demons, the fast tracking camera work, the opening credits that were over a book that resembled the Book of the Dead.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;What I can’t understand is, poor Bruce Campbell is getting old and I don’t know if he would be able to do another “Evil Dead” movie by 2012. Although he has proven that he is still kicking with his new movie and TV show.&lt;/p&gt;'
alias => 'drag_me_to_hell'
dt-publish => '8 years ago'
genre =>
__attr__id => 7
name => 'Horror'
logo => 'logo.jpg'
movie =>
__attr__id => 362
cover => 'cover.jpg'
title => 'Drag Me to Hell'
rating => 0
reviewer =>
__attr__id => 1329
avatar => 'default.jpg'
login => 'RichardPeter'
review-count => 11
user-dir => 'user_files/'
short-body => 'After a huge disappointment we had with the apartment Frank, Joe and I decided to go see the new movie “Drag Me To Hell.” They had seen it before me but they were willing to see it again… they apparently liked it. Here is what I thought: For a Sam and Ivan Raimi flick, it was pretty cool!!!! I was very surprised to see that there were so many great...'
teaser => 'It was pretty cool!!!!'
title => 'Drag Me to Hell'
type-id => 6
rss-link => 'reviews/dvd/?&g=7'
search-string => ''
rss => 'http://www.filmnet.com/rss/reviews/dvd/?&g=7'
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search =>
form-action => 'reviews'
userFiles => 'http://i.filmnet.com/user_files/'
videoFiles => 'http://i.filmnet.com/video_files/'

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  31. [0.13 ms] SELECT `m`.* FROM `movies` AS `m` WHERE (movie_id = '379')
  32. [0.24 ms] SELECT `users`.* FROM `users` WHERE (user_id='1341')
  33. [0.1 ms] SELECT `rg`.* FROM `review_genres` AS `rg` WHERE (genre_id = '7')
  34. [27.73 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `r`.*, `vr`.`video_id`, `cr`.`channel_id`, `ur`.`user_id`, `mr`.`movie_id` FROM `reviews` AS `r` LEFT JOIN `video__reviews` AS `vr` ON vr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `channel__reviews` AS `cr` ON cr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `user__reviews` AS `ur` ON ur.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `movie__reviews` AS `mr` ON mr.review_id = r.review_id WHERE (1 AND r.`reviewer_id` = 1341 AND r.is_published_review = 1 AND r.is_deleted_review = 0) ORDER BY `r`.`dt_published_review` DESC
  35. [4.31 ms] SELECT `m`.* FROM `movies` AS `m` WHERE (movie_id = '381')
  36. [0.2 ms] SELECT `users`.* FROM `users` WHERE (user_id='84')
  37. [0.1 ms] SELECT `rg`.* FROM `review_genres` AS `rg` WHERE (genre_id = '7')
  38. [54.7 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `r`.*, `vr`.`video_id`, `cr`.`channel_id`, `ur`.`user_id`, `mr`.`movie_id` FROM `reviews` AS `r` LEFT JOIN `video__reviews` AS `vr` ON vr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `channel__reviews` AS `cr` ON cr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `user__reviews` AS `ur` ON ur.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `movie__reviews` AS `mr` ON mr.review_id = r.review_id WHERE (1 AND r.`reviewer_id` = 84 AND r.is_published_review = 1 AND r.is_deleted_review = 0) ORDER BY `r`.`dt_published_review` DESC
  39. [0.23 ms] SELECT `m`.* FROM `movies` AS `m` WHERE (movie_id = '379')
  40. [0.22 ms] SELECT `users`.* FROM `users` WHERE (user_id='1329')
  41. [3.68 ms] SELECT `rg`.* FROM `review_genres` AS `rg` WHERE (genre_id = '7')
  42. [1.31 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `r`.*, `vr`.`video_id`, `cr`.`channel_id`, `ur`.`user_id`, `mr`.`movie_id` FROM `reviews` AS `r` LEFT JOIN `video__reviews` AS `vr` ON vr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `channel__reviews` AS `cr` ON cr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `user__reviews` AS `ur` ON ur.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `movie__reviews` AS `mr` ON mr.review_id = r.review_id WHERE (1 AND r.`reviewer_id` = 1329 AND r.is_published_review = 1 AND r.is_deleted_review = 0) ORDER BY `r`.`dt_published_review` DESC
  43. [0.12 ms] SELECT `m`.* FROM `movies` AS `m` WHERE (movie_id = '362')
  44. [1.06 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `rg`.* FROM `review_genres` AS `rg` LEFT JOIN `reviews` AS `r` ON rg.`genre_id` = r.`genre_id` WHERE (1 AND r.`review_type_id` = 6 AND r.`is_published_review` = 1 AND r.`is_deleted_review` = 0) ORDER BY `rg`.`genre_name` ASC

File Information

146 Files Included
Total Size: 1495.1K
Basepath: /mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/settings/../../../

Application Files

/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/Bootstrap.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/channels/models/Channels.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/default/models/Assistant.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/default/models/Filters.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/reviews/controllers/ReviewsController.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/reviews/models/Movies.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/reviews/models/ReviewGenres.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/reviews/models/Reviews.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/users/models/Users.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/videos/models/Videos.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/settings/config.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/system/acl.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/system/routes.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/Controller/Plugin/Acl.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/Controller/Plugin/AjaxCheck.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/Controller/Plugin/AutoLogin.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/Controller/Plugin/FlashMessenger.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/Controller/Plugin/InmailMessageCount.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/Paginator/Adapter/DbSelect.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/View/Serializer.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/View/Xslt.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/www/index.php

Zend Library Files

/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Assert/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Exception.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Resource.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Resource/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Role.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Role/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Role/Registry.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Role/Registry/Exception.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Auth.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Auth/Storage/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Auth/Storage/Session.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Cache.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Cache/Backend.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Cache/Backend/ExtendedInterface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Cache/Backend/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Cache/Backend/Memcached.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Cache/Core.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Config.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action/Helper/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action/Helper/FlashMessenger.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action/Helper/ViewRenderer.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action/HelperBroker.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action/HelperBroker/PriorityStack.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Dispatcher/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Dispatcher/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Dispatcher/Standard.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Exception.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Front.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Plugin/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Plugin/Broker.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Plugin/ErrorHandler.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Request/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Request/Http.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Response/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Response/Http.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Rewrite.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Route.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Route/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Route/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Route/Module.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Route/Regex.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Adapter/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Adapter/Pdo/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Adapter/Pdo/Mysql.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Expr.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Profiler.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Profiler/Query.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Select.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Statement.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Statement/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Statement/Pdo.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Table/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Exception.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Inflector.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/PregReplace.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/StringToLower.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Word/CamelCaseToDash.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Word/CamelCaseToSeparator.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Word/Separator/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Word/SeparatorToSeparator.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Word/UnderscoreToSeparator.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Form.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Json.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Json/Expr.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Loader.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Loader/Autoloader.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Loader/PluginLoader.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Loader/PluginLoader/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Locale.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Locale/Data/Translation.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Filter/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Filter/Priority.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Formatter/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Formatter/Simple.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Writer/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Writer/Stream.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Paginator.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Paginator/Adapter/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Paginator/ScrollingStyle/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Paginator/ScrollingStyle/Jumping.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Registry.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Session.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Session/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Session/Exception.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Session/Namespace.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Session/SaveHandler/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Translate.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Translate/Adapter.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Translate/Adapter/Gettext.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Uri.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Validate/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Version.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/HeadMeta.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/HeadTitle.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Placeholder/Container.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Placeholder/Container/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Placeholder/Container/Standalone.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Placeholder/Registry.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Interface.php

ZFDebug Library Files

/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Database.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Exception.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/File.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Html.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Memory.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Registry.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Text.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Time.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Variables.php

Memory Usage

Controller: 5495.62K

Custom Timers

Controller: 677.96 ms

Overall Timers

reviews
reviews
list
Avg: 1755.73 ms / 1 requests
Min: 1755.73 ms
Max: 1755.73 ms

Reset timers by sending ZFDEBUG_RESET as a GET/POST parameter

Registered Instances

Zend_View_Helper_Placeholder_Registry => Zend_View_Helper_Placeholder_Registry Object()
acl => Zend_Acl Object()
baseDir => 'http://www.filmnet.com/'
cache => Zend_Cache_Core Object()
config => Zend_Config Object()
db => Zend_Db_Adapter_Pdo_Mysql Object()
translator => Zend_Translate Object()
copyright 1.8.0/5.2.10-2ubuntu6variables Variableshtml HTMLdatabase 44 in 331.64 msfile 146 Filesmemory 15490K of 1024Mtime 1755.73 msregistry Registry (7)«