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“I like the tension, shock and general eeriness in horror films, as opposed to the blood and gore side of the genre.”

Andrew Pearce has accomplished a lot in the nearly 10 years since he started making movies. The filmmaker, who is all of 19, has ...

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Review by: MiamiMovieCritic

Added: 8 years ago

 

Eatliz

Genre: Music

The simple answer would be Eatliz plays rock.

Guy Ben Shetrit had a pretty good summer. The Israeli rocker and animator finished a project that was more than three years in the...

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Review by: MiamiMovieCritic

Added: 8 years ago

Grzegorz Jonkajtys Discusses His Mind-Blowing New Film, 36 STAIRS

36 Stairs is the first live-action short by Grzegorz Jonkajtys, the award-winning creator of ARK and Legacy. The movie is set ...

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Review by: MiamiMovieCritic

Added: 8 years ago

 

Many of our actors are people we went to theater school with. Part 2.

Tell us about the creative team behind Manic Attack Pictures. Some of us have known each other for almost 20 years. Casey Webb, ...

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Review by: MiamiMovieCritic

Added: 8 years ago

If we make each other laugh, we go for it. Part 1.

Founded by two sons of the Jersey Shore, Manic Attack Pictures is a two-year-old production company focusing on comedic series and...

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Review by: MiamiMovieCritic

Added: 8 years ago

 

“Our strongest tool was our script.”

Wormtooth Nation is a wildly ambitious science-fiction feature. It was inspired by William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream...

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Review by: MiamiMovieCritic

Added: 8 years ago

"Filmmaking is basically all we do. It's our life... pretty much."

FilmNet is so excited to feature the work of FetusFilmsInc. Not only are these some really ambitious and creative filmmakers, but ...

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Review by: MiamiMovieCritic

Added: 8 years ago

 

"The cinema I wanna make involves a more close to real life feeling." Part 2.

In the months since we last spoke to him, Patrick Boivin has been a busy man. His wild popularity on YouTube drew the attention of...

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Review by: MiamiMovieCritic

Added: 8 years ago

"Since I didn't go to film school, nobody told me I wasn't supposed to do everything." Part 1.

Conducted in the fall of 2008, this is the first of a two-part interview with Patrick Boivin, one of FilmNet’s top contributors. ...

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Review by: MiamiMovieCritic

Added: 8 years ago

 

Gain inspiration from everywhere – just collect it.

Tim Clague is an award-winning filmmaker, writer and independent film advocate who's been active in film and television ...

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Review by: MiamiMovieCritic

Added: 8 years ago

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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href=&quot;http://www.filmnet.com/users/AndrewPearce/&quot;&gt;Andrew Pearce&lt;/a&gt; has accomplished a lot in the nearly 10 years since he started making movies. The filmmaker, who is all of 19, has won numerous local and international awards. He grew up on a farm in Australia. His hometown, Kergunyah (situated in the northeastern part of the state of Victoria), has a population of 188. Stuck out in the boonies, Pearce relied on family members to act in his movies. He learned how to write, shoot and edit. He scoured the Web and local art brochures, looking for festivals and competitions that might accept his films. Most of them did.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Falling mostly under the horror genre, Pearce’s films show a rare gift for screen direction and a rhythmic editing style. This is a filmmaker who knows how to create a visceral viewing experience. &lt;a href=&quot;http://www.filmnet.com/&quot;&gt;FilmNet&lt;/a&gt; recently spoke with the young virtuoso about his life’s work so far, both as a filmmaker and as an award-winning photographer.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;You started shooting at a very young age. What sparked your interest in film?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I always had a fascination with the fact that it was possible to record sounds and images. I bought radios, handheld tape recorders, disposable cameras – practically anything that would record. Then, at the age of 10, I spent all my money on a black-and-white security camera which was wired to the TV. Since that purchase nearly 10 years ago, I have been making films. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;What was the first film you ever made?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The first film I ever made was with my security camera. It was a short horror film about a mysterious creature which roamed the neighborhoods, kidnapping people and leaving a potato peeler where they last stood. The film was suitably titled “Peeler”. I often acted in my films, as living on a farm in the country I don’t have many casting options. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Did you have any mentors or people who encouraged you along the way?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;There were always people who gave me feedback, and encouraged me to keep at it, but no more so than my parents. They would drive me around to the film locations, to film festivals around the country, and they even acted in numerous films, to their embarrassment. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;I assume Ben Pearce and Samantha Pearce – the young actors who appear in some of your films – are your brother and sister. What’s it like working with them on set? Do you have a hard time getting them to take you seriously?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Ben and Samantha are my cousins, who conveniently live two minutes down the road. I have known them since they were born, and see them regularly, so they are pretty much my brother and sister. When I first began working with them, it was difficult, as they were only about 6 and 8 and would forget my directions. So I left it a few years, and gave it another go, and this time they were perfect! They would listen to every direction, and they would take it seriously, and they just happened to have some talent for it! Since then they have been my star cast, and for each film they get to choose a gift off of eBay as a reward for their good work. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Let’s talk about &lt;a href=&quot;http://www.filmnet.com/films/fear_at_dusk/&quot;&gt;Fear at Dusk&lt;/a&gt;<br /> . What ideas did you want to get across in the screenplay?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;With &lt;a href=&quot;http://www.filmnet.com/films/fear_at_dusk/&quot;&gt;Fear at Dusk&lt;/a&gt;<br /> , I wanted it to be an emotional rollercoaster in under three minutes. It begins with happiness, followed by mystery, fear, then shock and extreme sadness. This film has been played at various film festivals, and I have seen people scream, jump in their seats and their jaws drop. I basically wanted to get an audience reaction, and I did.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;You create a lot of tension with subjective shots and quick cuts, and the music is also very effective. Tell us about the making of the film.&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The film began with an idea, which I wrote into a script. I wrote the script around the location, music and cast, so this made the overall production so much smoother. It was filmed over two nights at dusk. I mostly used natural lighting, which was difficult at dusk because it darkens quickly, so the filming was rather fast paced. I edited the film around the cues in the music. The rhythm, melody, and chord changes determined the duration of each shot. If the melody was to swing, then I would use it with the shot when the character swings their head. You can say my editing process is like dancing; I choreograph the film to the music. But this can be dangerous, because if you edit too closely to the music, you can begin to obscure the storyline and people will get confused!! &lt;a href=&quot;http://www.filmnet.com/films/fear_at_dusk/&quot;&gt;Fear at Dusk&lt;/a&gt;<br /> is my quickest film to date, taking just over two weeks to complete from first idea to the final product.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;All of the movies you’ve uploaded to &lt;a href=&quot;http://www.filmnet.com/&quot;&gt;FilmNet&lt;/a&gt; are horror movies. What do you like about this genre?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I like the tension, shock and general eeriness in horror films, as opposed to the blood and gore side of the genre. The great thing about horror is it can evoke reactions from the audience, which is a driving reason for why I make films. I have moved slightly from horror now, and more to an eerie mystery/adventure style.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;You’re also an award-winning photographer. I’m very impressed with your perspectives and use of light. Talk about your development as a photographer. I assume nobody starts out that good…&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Thank you! My photography interest comes back to my fascination with recording things. Photography stemmed off from my film work, because I have a passion for cinematography. I became more serious about photography in the last three years when I was doing it as a subject in year 11 &amp;amp; 12. I used to do many photo manipulations in Photoshop, but in the last year I’ve been putting more effort into taking the photograph, and using Photoshop as a means of enhancement. Recently I have been successful with competitions and exhibitions, and with the prize money I have purchased a digital SLR camera.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Who are some of your heroes?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Magdalena Wanli, Simon Strong, Kate Bush, Tori Amos, Chris Lilley&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;I know you’re into music. Name some of your favorite bands.&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Bertie Blackman, Florence &amp;amp; the Machine, Kate Bush, MGMT, Tori Amos&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;What are you working on now?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I’m currently working on film &amp;amp; photography commission work here and there, but I hope to get a film done for myself on the Christmas holidays. And in the meantime I’m continuously photographing and getting my work out there for the world to see!&lt;/p&gt;'
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;Guy Ben Shetrit had a pretty good summer. The Israeli rocker and animator finished a project that was more than three years in the making: a 3D animated music video for “Hey,” a killer track released by his very own rock band, Eatliz. Guy directed, wrote and served as supervising animator on the film, which he entered into The Babelgum Online Film Festival. Out of 12,000 submissions, it won the Spike Lee Award for animation. Ben crossed the pond to accept the award and got to meet the legendary filmmaker in person.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The music video for &lt;a href=&quot;http://www.filmnet.com/music/eatliz_hey/&quot;&gt;&quot;Hey&quot;&lt;/a&gt; is a darkly comic eye-popper about a little girl and her gargantuan pet toad. It shows a terrific flair for character detail, and is obviously the work of a delightfully twisted imagination. In addition to his success as an animator, Guy’s band is doing quite well. Eatliz’s debut album, Violently Delicate, was released to critical acclaim in 2007. You can &lt;a href=&quot;http://www.eatliz.com/?p=1&quot;&gt;download the album for free&lt;/a&gt;.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;FilmNet spoke with Guy about winning the Spike Lee Award, the musical stylings of Eatliz, and the importance of dropping acid at the opportune moment.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Hey Guy, congratulations on winning the Spike Lee award! What was it like meeting Mr. Spike Lee?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Thank you very much! Getting the prize from Mr. Lee himself, knowing he personally picked my work, was mind blowing. Crossing the universe to meet him and get the prize from him was very exciting. I and the other awarded directors were told that he cherishes his privacy, so I managed to swat only a few words with him before the ceremony. It's really important for him to support young directors, so he is involved in some international film competitions. I was really grateful getting the Babelgum award from Spike Lee.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;You have a lot of experience working on commercials, TV shows and videos games in Israel. Is the production scene a thriving industry there?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The Israeli production scene is very advanced and comprehensive. In addition, the Israeli Animation Industry is very big and wide, considering the size and the population of Israel. The professionalism is very high and there's lots of talent. For example, here is a sample of the studios that I worked with: &lt;a href=&quot;http://onewingfly.com/&quot;&gt;One Wing Fly&lt;/a&gt;, &lt;a href=&quot;http://www.studio-aiko.com/&quot;&gt;Studio Aiko&lt;/a&gt; and &lt;a href=&quot;http://www.snowballvfx.com/&quot;&gt;Snowball&lt;/a&gt;. Regarding TV shows and videos games, I can say that we didn't quite “set the flag of the mountain top” and didn't conquer yet this target. I think that the local scene still hasn't produced a quality long term series, which has a couple of seasons, and has firm output and one that will be demanded out of Israel. I am not speaking of a children or preschoolers series, but a high quality series. We are still in a process of getting there and in the recent years we’ve been closer than ever. We certainly have some stable production companies that manage to survive and their future looks promising. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;In terms of Israeli-produced animation, the big success story last year was Ari Froman’s Academy Award-nominated Waltz with Bashir. Are you a fan of the film?&lt;/b&gt; &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I truly appreciate Waltz with Bashir, which really got me hooked from its look and flow. But as the movie got its recognition in the world, I got the feeling (not for the last time as I see it) that the world embraces Israeli cinema when it has harsh criticism of Israel's military activity. It seems like the movie industry really applauds when an Israeli director stresses his negative and fundamental criticism on Israel. In Waltz with Bashir the director, who tells the story from his perspective, testifies that he was and wasn't there, because he lost his memory regarding these events. It like getting caught with drugs and when being questioned about it you answer that you have a blackout exactly in the point when you bought the stuff. It seems that if an Israeli director wants to get recognition outside of Israel and compete and win international festivals, he should produce a movie about the Israeli army. I won't go into a political discussion because it's not the right place to do that, but that's what Folman's movie aroused in me as it went outside of the Israeli border.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Let’s talk about your band, Eatliz. How would you describe the band’s musical style?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I get this question a lot. The simple answer would be Eatliz plays rock. But the honest and complicated answer would be that I don't have an answer to this question, which actually makes me happy. I would like that in the future, when a new band sets up and its style isn’t so clear to itself and to its listeners - that you would be able to say that this music reminds of Eatliz.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;The music video for “Hey” took almost three years to make with a 15-person crew. Talk about the job of an animation director. I don’t think it’s a process people understand very well…&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Fifteen people were involved in the process of making &amp;quot;&lt;a href=&quot;http://www.filmnet.com/music/eatliz_hey/&quot;&gt;Hey&lt;/a&gt;&amp;quot;, all of them top professionals in animation, art and 3D design in Israel. The production pipeline was set up following the principles and workflow of major animation studios, which was really important to me. No step was skipped in the process, from script writing to design, modeling and character development, followed by a painstaking animation process. All of the above was completed under my direction by art directors, model artists, and technical direction and rigging. The final stages of shading, texturing, lighting, look &amp;amp; feel, rendering, VFX and compositing were done by Aiko Studio.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I was the director, screenwriter, producer, executive producer and supervising animator. I was involved in the animation, modeling, technical direction and rigging of the film. This means I was managing both the creative and the administrative animation pipe line going on. I chose all the 15 crew members and managed all the production.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;It feels really natural to me since all my life as an animator I needed to work in all these areas, until I got to the point that I was able to do only animation or supervising animation. My work demanded knowledge of every step in the pipeline, so for me it's was quite natural not to wait for the lightning to be ready, for example, and just feel the holes myself and do whatever I can in order to push the project forward. At the end of the day, this was my personal project and I had a very restricted budget I was able to afford to pay. So any assistance from my side was a blessing to the rest of the crew. Of course, that this format of work allowed me to be more involved and to monitor all the process, I could prevent future obstacles – especially in the crucial parts where if you made a mistake earlier, it takes a lot of effort to go back and correct it.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;I’ve read that you’re a huge fan of anime master Hayao Miyazaki. Did you have any specific scenes from Miyazaki in mind when you made Hey?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Absolutely. Many things from Miyazaki's Spirited Away inspired me. &lt;a href=&quot;http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7DVe60-W3SU&quot;&gt;Here is a specific scene&lt;/a&gt; that reminded me of the proportions between the girl and her huge toad in Hey. Here we can see the proportion between the girl and her &amp;quot;friend&amp;quot;, this mysterious creature that enters the train.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;By the way, one of the references that led me to the Toad's personality was an illustration by the <br /> &lt;a href=&quot;http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=75936885041&quot;&gt;French Illustrations artist Bengal&lt;/a&gt;, which also displays a situation of a little girl and a huge man. Here, again, we see a situation of a little girl and a giant inside a train wagon&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Have you seen his latest, Ponyo?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Yes, I saw Ponyo and really enjoyed it. Miyazaki doesn't stop dreaming and hallucinating and continues to be a child for all of us, even in his age.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;The video for “Attractive” is also amazing. When you’re not directing the videos yourself, what input does the band have on the look and story of the videos?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;By now Eatliz has only two animation music videos; &lt;a href=&quot;http://www.filmnet.com/music/eatliz_attractive/&quot;&gt;“Attractive”&lt;/a&gt; was our first animation music video. It was directed by animation mentor Yuval Nathan. I didn't have any intention to bother or advise him. Maybe apart from some editing and tempo, I didn't interfere. I and rest of the band knew we were in the hands of a master.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;You’ve said an important event in your life was an acid trip you took when you were younger. How did that experience change your life creatively?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;It changed a lot in me and in many ways, mostly in the mental aspect. I must say I was in a very good and free of worry stage of my life that was a good age to experience this. I don't think that today I would come out of such a thing so well, it might end up badly. Before taking it, I lived like a man with a half white-half white page in front of his eyes. During the experience, it was like someone came and removed this filter, which let me see clear, like a person who goes to the eye doctor and the optometrist fixes his glasses to the right prescription. When you have the right lens, everything is much more easy-going. On a creative level, I understood how far our brain can take us into an imaginary world I never dreamt I could perceive. Every time I enter to some kind of a trance of images and ideas, and don't hurry to say &amp;quot;Eureka!&amp;quot;, but allow my fictional world to blossom and develop to the unknown directions. I try not to let my ego burst and interfere and take over the steering wheel too fast, at least not before my fictional world finishes its journey. Sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn't work.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;What else inspires you?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Tasty food and creative recipes; all sorts of interesting mixtures. You never know if they’re going to work out until you put them together on your tongue.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Hey official website: &lt;a href=&quot;http://www.eatliz.com/hey/eng/main.html&quot;&gt;http://www.eatliz.com/hey&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Eatliz Myspace: &lt;a href=&quot;http://www.myspace.com/eatliz&quot;&gt;http://www.myspace.com/eatliz&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p&gt;'
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;&lt;a href=&quot;http://www.filmnet.com/films/36_stairs/&quot;&gt; 36 Stairs&lt;/a&gt; is the first live-action short by Grzegorz Jonkajtys, the award-winning creator of &lt;a href=&quot;http://www.filmnet.com/films/ark/&quot;&gt; ARK&lt;/a&gt; and &lt;a href=&quot;http://www.filmnet.com/films/legacy/&quot;&gt; Legacy&lt;/a&gt;. The movie is set in a polluted, megalopolis world in which humans utterly depend on bio-mechanical alterations to withstand the climate. The film has generated a lot of interest since the release of the &lt;a href=&quot;http://www.filmnet.com/films/36_stairs/&quot;&gt; trailer&lt;/a&gt;, which shows off some astonishing FX work and hints that Jonkajtys might have a sci-fi masterpiece on his hands.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;When he’s not making indie movies, he works as a CG artist for Industrial Light and Magic. His credits include PAN’S LABYRINTH, THE MIST and TERMINATOR: SALVATION. Originally from Poland, he now lives in San Francisco. FilmNet recently caught up with the filmmaker to discuss his ambitious new project.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Hi Greg! Congratulations on the trailer – I think the movie is going to be fantastic. Correct me if I’m wrong, but this looks like a “virtual backlot” movie, like SKY CAPTAIN and SIN CITY. Did you build sets or was everything done digitally?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Thank you! I'm glad you liked the trailer. So far what you have seen in the trailer – there are only two green screen shots. All the rest is either shot on the set that I built myself in my basement or against real architecture, or real bathroom walls. Of course, I’m extending the sets virtually (the outdoor shots), but I'm trying to keep as much of a real background as possible.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Last time we spoke, I asked you about the writing process and you said: “I tend to write down very rough ideas, and jump into the animatics. Since I can very quickly visualize the story, using very rough sketches, some low quality audio samples, and editing software, I tend to immediately create a sequence, rather than go through iterations of written story.” Since this was your first live-action movie, how did that process change?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;This time, I also started with sketches and animatics, but then moved on to written script and previz that we shot using a $100 camera with producer/co-writer Philip Koch. As we were editing the previz shots, we would add parts of the script, re-shoot, add more, etc. It was a very creative process.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;&lt;a href=&quot;http://www.filmnet.com/films/36_stairs/&quot;&gt; 36 Stairs&lt;/a&gt; is set in a future world where humans depend on bio-mechanical alterations to withstand the climate. We see a few of these alterations in the trailer. Were you inspired by the work of David Cronenberg or other biological horror movies?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Definitely. The creature you see at the very end of the trailer is somewhat inspired by Cronenberg's EXISTENZ, but in my film it has a completely different function and meaning. Also, this is not the cell phone that you see inside it – although many people think so, possibly because of sound design, with lots of phone calls, etc. I don't mind it, though; this trailer is supposed to make you ask questions. You'll get all the answers when you see the film.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Tell us how you designed this distinctive dystopian world. It looks like a bureaucratic nightmare – like something out of 1984 or THE TRIAL.&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I wanted to bring certain aspects of what’s happening in the contemporary society and push it a bit further. The world Jeffrey, the main character, lives in is not set in any particular time or place. We will see a lot of stylistically and periodically mismatched designs, equipments and architecture. With this approach, on an extremely limited budget, it’s easier to find the props and sets rather than build everything from scratch. Plus, it serves the story, creating a kind of conglomerate of periodical and modern elements. Jeffrey’s haircut and clothing (designed by Gus Harput) is very much inspired by Winston’s character from the film 1984.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Of course, the movie is also very relevant. It deals with things like the health insurance industry. How do you avoid becoming too preachy?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The movie is all about Jeffery's case. The most important aspect of the story is how he will react in the situation he has found himself in – what his choice will be. The insurance situation is only a setting that serves this story. I think it's good that it is so relevant. More people can relate to it.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Which camera did you use?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Finally, after waiting for so long for the firmware update, we used Canon 5D Mark II. Apart from being cheap, this camera gives a great picture, is light, portable, easy to use and the files are very easy to manage once we shot scenes. On the downside, of course, is the fact that the footage is compressed and only 8 bit. I have had some experience with 8 bit footage before. Working on &lt;a href=&quot;http://www.filmnet.com/films/ark/&quot;&gt; ARK&lt;/a&gt;, I color corrected the whole film in 8 bit, output it to 35 mm, saw it in a really big theater at Cannes and it looked just great. So I'm not too scared of it. If the story will hold up, no one will care about high and low ends being clamped a bit.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Tell us about casting your lead, Rodrigo Lopresti, in the role of Jeffrey Brief and working with him.&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I met Rodrigo a couple of years ago, when working at CafeFX. He visited a friend there, and we talked for a couple of minutes. It was after he released his film &lt;a href=&quot;http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0829224/&quot;&gt; Lucia&lt;/a&gt;. When casting for &lt;a href=&quot;http://www.filmnet.com/films/36_stairs/&quot;&gt; 36 Stairs&lt;/a&gt;, I e-mailed the script to Rodrigo, and he sent back a 5-minute video of the most intense scene in the film. It was so moving and authentic that we had no doubt that was it. Working with him was a great pleasure. He contributed a lot to the project, and I would love to make another film with him.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Is the movie finished? When will it be released?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I’m still working on the edit. We (Philip and I) did the trailer almost all by ourselves, and it took a long time. The initial plan to finish the film was February 2010. It really depends on how much help we get with VFX.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;What’s the status of your feature screenplay, THE SNOW KING?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;SNOW KING is a very personal project. It’s the story of an old painter, who’s considered a genius. He lives in contemporary New York, in his own nightmarish world of demons and twisted caricatures that he paints. He is neglecting the outside world, his fame and his friends. A young art student helps him with his day-to-day chores; she is fascinated by his art. One day, when the artist is asleep, she finds his memoir – a book that explains why he became what he is. She starts reading it and together we go back to the beginning of World War II, in Poland in 1940.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;This story is loosely based on real events. My father, Marian Jonkajtys, was deported with his family to North Kazakhstan in 1940. His father – my grandfather – was arrested by Soviet military police, and they never heard from him again. After six years, my father came back to Poland with his brothers and sisters and my grandmother. Not until the late 1980s did my father start writing about this period in his life. His books became a great inspiration for this project.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The scope of this film will be pretty big. I'm slowly adding ideas and scenes to the story, but for now I'm concentrating more on current projects. I will need a big budget to conceive SNOW KING the way I really want it.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;a href=&quot;http://36stairsfilm.com/&quot;&gt; Visit the Official Website for 36 STAIRS.&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p&gt;'
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Tell us about the creative team behind Manic Attack Pictures.&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Some of us have known each other for almost 20 years. Casey Webb, our producer/actor, and Christopher Burke have known each other since they were five. Chris, Casey and I became good friends in high school, where we spent a lot of time getting in trouble, which gave us a lot of stuff to write about today.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;We’ve been working with our cinematographer, Lance Kaplan, since Day 1. We’ve shot almost 200 days together, and he’s the most consistent guy I know. He is passionate and has a tireless work ethic. He’s not the kind of guy who wants to get home; he wants to get the most beautiful shot possible, no matter how long it takes.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;TJ Alston, our lighting director, does an amazing job. TJ is a graduate of NYU, and is probably the smartest guy on the set. He works fast and can always find a solution to any issue you may be having.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Jonathan Lee, our creative editor, has been working in post production since he graduated from Marymount College in Manhattan, where he was a theater major. Jon’s love of music and great sense of humor add a really special touch to the shorts. I first met John 10 years ago through a mutual friend, Mathew Crowley, who stars in the Speed Creeper series.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Casey Webb is our producer. He’s always producing. There is a running joke that we should make T-shirts that say, “I know Casey, too.” He knows everyone, and his relationships all around the great state of New Jersey and NYC make getting locations for next-to-nothing a Godsend when you’re working on a very limited budget. Casey also contributes to the writing in some of the shorts, such as &lt;i&gt;Charlie’s Un-Chutney&lt;/i&gt; and &lt;i&gt;Me and Ma&lt;/i&gt;. As an actor, he can be seen as Tinkerbell O’Chessee, Richard McGillicutty and many more.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Many of our actors are people we went to theater school with. I attended the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, and Christopher is a graduate of the New School’s Actor’s Studio MFA program. Along the way, we met John Norwell, Olivia Horton, Gary Cowling, Timothy Davis, Eric Garcia, Bob Manus and many others. All of these people are professional actors in every sense of the word. They work often in the NY Theater and in Film and TV. Gary Cowling can be seen in the new Uma Thurman movie, &lt;i&gt;The Accidental Husband&lt;/i&gt;, and Timothy Davis was just in Stephen Soderbergh’s latest film, &lt;i&gt;The Girlfriend Experience&lt;/i&gt;, which just premiered at this year’s Sundance Film Festival.&lt;/p&gt;'
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;Founded by two sons of the Jersey Shore, Manic Attack Pictures is a two-year-old production company focusing on comedic series and shorts. At its best (Mommy Menthol, Katie the Coked-Up Waitress), the company’s output takes inspiration from the oddball characters and eccentricities of the place where the creators grew up. The creative team is headed by Christopher Burke and Tommy Walsh. FilmNet caught up with Walsh to talk about improvisation, influences and where the chain-smoking, cross-dressing Mommy Menthol came from. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;You guys have been working together for almost a decade. What are some of the films you made before forming Manic Attack Pictures?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;We both started out in New York as actors. We were in the same theater companies around town, and we did a lot of theater in NYC before starting to get serious about writing and making movies. Our first project was a feature film called Shooting Johnson Roebling, which we will be streaming on Manic Attack as well as other online platforms later this year. Roebling was a beast of a project. We spent two years writing and raising and saving money. It took an additional two years and 45 days of shooting to finally complete. We almost drove each other insane with the hours we were putting in. It was pretty crazy, but we finally got it done and premiered it at the Hoboken International Film Festival in June 2007. We took it to three additional festivals: The Indie Gathering in Cleveland, The Red Bank International Film Fest in Red Bank, NJ, and The Independent Features Film Festival at the Tribeca Cinemas in NYC. We learned so much from the entire process.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Talk about the writing process. Are you guys into scripted comedy or do you like to improvise?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;We definitely like to have a scripted outline of where we want to go. All of our actors are such good improvisers that it's exciting to see what they will come up with next. The downside to non-scripted material is that it makes the editing process much more difficult. The improv-based work is better for our shorter content, but when we start dealing with the Web series and longer form, we always like to have that scripted. But we're open if an actor comes to us with an idea about what they may like to add or change. We're not that anal when it comes to our written word.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Bob Manus is comic gold. What can you tell us about Bob?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Bob Manus is in a league of his own. Bob has been a New York performer for all of his adult life. He had a small role in the cult classic &lt;i&gt;The Warriors&lt;/i&gt;, and co-wrote the film &lt;i&gt;The Force Within&lt;/i&gt;. He has been doing theater in NYC, and has written many stage plays. Bob can make pretty much anything funny. We're lucky to be able to work with him.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Mommy Menthol is a great show. How did you come up this character?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Mommy Menthol was inspired by a woman driving a car on Shrewsbury Avenue in Red Bank, NJ. She was smoking with the windows up, and her daughter was in the back in a car seat, inhaling all the smoke. I pulled up alongside them in my car with my friend, Matt Crowley, and it was after a long day of shooting, and we were both fried, so I just started pretending to be her and riffing. Matt started laughing and there it was. I think what Christopher, Casey (Webb) and I do is basically see if we can make each other laugh, and if that works, we know it's funny. We're not ones to give reassuring laughter to each other. If we make each other laugh, we go for it.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Some of Mommy's back story is explained in the first season, but is there anything else you can tell us about this character?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Mommy is a mystery even to me. She isn't without redeeming qualities, though. Mommy's problem is that she thinks she doesn't have choices. She's uneducated, and she blames her children for her unhappiness. Truth is, she's just not that happy being herself. She feels money will solve everything, and we all know that's not true. The funny thing about her is that she thinks she's pretty, which is where a lot of the jokes come in.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;You play Mommy in the series. How do you get into character?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I usually just start improv-ing with other cast and crew members while Lindsey Novotny, our makeup artist, is working her magic. I like to be around people and test stuff out on them. If I can make the crew laugh, then I know I'm headed in the right direction. If not, I better go find some energy. That's pretty much it. I don't require that people refer to me as Mommy on set. That would actually be quite frightening.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Name some filmmakers/comedians who inspire you.&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;A lot of our influences are pulled from many places for different reasons. The Coen Brothers and Farrely Brothers both use the camera and editing to get a lot of their comedy across, and for the lunacy of the short-form &amp;quot;sketch&amp;quot; format, you can't beat Monty Python, or SNL's first cast, &amp;quot;The Not Ready for Prime-Time Players.&amp;quot; A lot of really smart comedians like George Carlin and Bill Maher, too, in-your-face guys like Sam Kinison. We grew up on Howard Stern every morning. Then there are the bad ‘80s movies and television shows that were not supposed to be funny at the time, but ultimately made us laugh. (I'm pretty sure &lt;i&gt;Eight is Enough&lt;/i&gt; was not a comedy.) But really, the biggest influences were those around us growing up on the Jersey Shore. Older brothers and sisters, the culture that is the Jersey Shore, is great fodder for laughs. Our families, growing up in the ‘80s, the list is endless. Like I said before, if we can make each other laugh, we'll go for it. If it ends up making others laugh, then that's a bonus!&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Many of your movies, especially I Deserve It and Katie the Coked-Up Waitress, are very pleasing to the eye. Why is the technical side important when you’re doing comedy?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I don't think the technical side can be removed from the equation when speaking about comedy or drama. Overall, it's just too important to overlook. Making comedy look good was never an issue until everyone was able to afford a video camera and post their stuff to the Net. Now it seems that the &amp;quot;norm&amp;quot; is to see a funny video with really terrible production value. It's accepted, and maybe even to a point expected a little. I think that we see ourselves first and foremost as filmmakers, rather than comedians or a sketch comedy group. We like to incorporate camera movement, slashes of light for mood, fill the frame with interesting things to look at other than the subject. We like to create little films the best way we can, and make them look the best that they can be. I guess there are some &amp;quot;technical&amp;quot; tricks to editing comedy, but it really depends on the specific piece, and the approach we took to shoot it. We try to change up our angles, camera moves, etc, from one video to the next so that each one has its own identity.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;What are your goals for Manic Attack Pictures and how do you hope to meet them?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I think that we are realizing our hopes for Manic Attack Pictures in small doses every day. Our intention when we started was to become a full-service digital studio that can deliver you a product from concept all the way to a marketing strategy, and we are doing just that, with every project, whether big or small, that we come up with.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;i&gt;To hear more about the Manic Team, &lt;a href=&quot;http://w3.filmnet.com/reviews/interview_with_manic_attack_pictures_2/&quot;&gt;click here&lt;/a&gt;.&lt;/i&gt;&lt;/p&gt;'
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;Wormtooth Nation is a wildly ambitious science-fiction feature. It was inspired by William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and was completed as a student project at Maharishi University of Management in Iowa.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Set in an underground city where an armed rebellion is underway, the film is a complex and atmospheric new addition to the Steampunk subgenre of fantasy fiction, which usually features steam-powered technology and speculative narratives about the future.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Geoff Boothby and Cullen Thomas wrote the film, which was released as a 9-episode Web series. Boothby directed and Thomas served as cinematographer. The series is available on FilmNet, and a feature-length cut has been released on DVD.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Boothby spoke with FilmNet about Wormtooth Nation, shooting on a $4,000 budget in the Midwest, and working with cult legend David Lynch.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;How did this creative partnership begin with you and Cullen?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;We both grew up in Fairfield, Iowa, and went to the same school, so we've known each other for awhile. But we first worked together on a short film in college called We Are Theo in 2007. (You can watch it here.)&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Talk about the writing process. Are you sitting in a room together, or do you work separately?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;A combination of both, actually. For this film we sat together, and brainstormed, and created a detailed outline for the script over a number of months. Then I took the outline and wrote the first draft of the script. Which was hard. No matter how much you like writing, actually getting yourself to sit down and do it is one of the most difficult things in the world. But I forced myself to do it, and I wrote 90% of it in two days. Then I handed it over to Cully, he added the two flashback episodes, and also cleaned and revised the whole thing on his own for all subsequent drafts (with my feedback).&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Ironically enough, we originally had only one flashback episode (#4), but we wanted to try to push the film length to 90 minutes so it would be considered a feature by all standards. So Cully wrote Episode 6: The Theory of Serias to flesh out the length a little, and it actually ended up being many people's favorite episode.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Once we had a fairly finished script, we sent it to a bunch of people for feedback - which was possibly the most useful part of the whole process, because it helps give you an idea of how people will react to the finished piece.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;What films and other works of fiction inspired Wormtooth Nation? Were you fans of A Midsummer Night's Dream before this project?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I was inspired by &lt;i&gt;Blade Runner, Delicatessen&lt;/i&gt;, and the Manga &lt;i&gt;BLAME!&lt;/i&gt;, among others.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Cully was influenced by [Joss Whedon's television series] &amp;quot;Firefly&amp;quot; mainly, but also by abstract modern graffiti art and stencil art in coming up with images for the film.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I am heavily influenced by music, and for this project I was listening to the &lt;i&gt;Akira&lt;/i&gt; soundtrack by Shoji Yamashiro a whole lot while writing and shooting.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;One of the things that really inspired me early on was the idea of shooting completely in interiors. I thought, &amp;quot;Independent sci-fi is pretty bad. But if we create this world in mostly darkness, shot entirely inside, we will have so much control that I think we can make it good.&amp;quot; And that idea really stuck with me.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Cully and I were both in a production of &lt;i&gt;A Midsummer Night's Dream&lt;/i&gt; when we were in high school - him as Snug the Joiner, me as Puck - and it's a personal favorite of ours, so making a Steampunk version was kind of an obvious choice.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;The movie puts a lot of faith in the audience to pick up on character names and back stories. Was there a lot of discussion about how to keep viewers from getting lost?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Yes. This is the longest project I have done to date, 85 minutes - the next longest being &lt;i&gt;We Are Theo&lt;/i&gt; at 20 minutes - so my instinct when writing has always been to simplify. (I'm used to short films). I had a hard time being comfortable with the complexity, but Cully (who has more long-form writing experience) assured me it would be fine. Also, we both prefer not to underestimate our audience, and to create a story that could be watched more than once and still present new things.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;You shot on a shoestring budget in the middle of Iowa. How were you able to create the illusion of an underground city? Where were you shooting exactly?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Wormtooth Nation could have been filmed in any city or town in any state - with enough bargaining. Locations like the ones we found exist everywhere. But that doesn't mean it was easy - Cully was our locations manager, and I think it was the hardest job he did (and he did a good job). We filmed in friends' basements, boiler rooms, a machine refurbishing factory, a water processing plant, a water tower, and an old armory building (about 80% was filmed in the armory), among others.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;But I think the lighting and soundscapes went a long way towards creating the underground feel as well.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;In terms of doing it all on such a small budget - being a student film helps, people are willing to give you things for free if you are a student film - but the biggest thing is having a lot of friends and a story that will inspire them. Our strongest tool was our script. When people read it they wanted to be part of it and they didn't care if they were getting paid.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;How did you assemble such a great cast in Fairfield, which has a population of less than 10,000?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Fairfield is somewhat of an oasis in the Midwest. There are a lot of families that have moved here from the coasts, and consequently there is a surprising amount of culture, including a very strong theater scene. I am an actor, so many of my friends are actors. Basically everyone in Wormtooth Nation is a friend of ours (which is the only way to do it when you aren't paying anyone and making them shoot in freezing cold basements all winter), but I still held auditions.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;What's on the DVD? And who did the cover art? It’s fantastic.&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The DVD has the feature version of Wormtooth, an Outtakes Reel, a Featurette on the premiere in Fairfield, and two commentaries on the film - one from Cully and I, and one from David J. Murphy (composer), Donald Revolinski (assistant producer) and Paul Morehead (production artist). Paul is the one who did the DVD art, as well as the rest of the art in the film - propaganda posters, logo, and night-sky scapes. He is an animator who went to high school with Cully and me.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;The movie was first released as a Web series on theskyisfree.com. What excites you about online series?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I think that Web serials are one of the most exciting ways to go for filmmaking right now. There is a massive potential audience right at our fingertips. The only tricks are to get that audience to actually watch our work, and to monetize.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;But one of the most exciting things about it for me is that we don't have to move to L.A. or New York to make films. We can live wherever we want and still have the ability to reach an audience, and make good work. It is really hard to do it in the big cities - it's expensive and there is a lot of competition. In smaller towns it's comparatively very easy - for very small-budget indies, that is.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Both you and Cullen work for David Lynch Foundation Television. What's it like working for the coolest man on the planet?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Haha, it's awesome. We work from Iowa, and get to speak with David a couple times a month. It is definitely an interesting experience pitching ideas to someone like him. You know right away if your idea is good or bad, and sometimes if he gives you an idea it takes days for you to realize how genius it is. He really works from a different level.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;What's next?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Since we are full time with DLF.TV, most of our video projects are through them, but I have a few ideas in the works and I know Cully does, too. For now we are working on them separately, and once things get going it's possible we will start working together on one of them. But, I can definitely tell you we are both interested in continuing to utilize Web series as a medium, so you can definitely expect more from each of us in that area.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Art by William Hessian&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;'
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;FilmNet is so excited to feature the work of FetusFilmsInc. Not only are these some really ambitious and creative filmmakers, but they’re also a tremendous inspiration. Most of their movies were completed when they were still in high school, and it’s remarkable how much they were able to achieve with no formal training. The level of filmmaking is nothing short of extraordinary.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Fetus Films consists of Justin Benefiel, Andrew Shafer and Aaron and Austin Keeling. At 18, the Keelings have already completed a feature-length film. It’s called I.Q., an ambitious, Jacob’s Ladder-style horror movie about a teacher who gives his students an experimental drug to help boost their grades. It took more than a year to complete. You can buy the DVD here.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The majority of this interview was conducted with Aaron Keeling in January 2009. Recently, we caught up with Aaron again to discuss I.Q. and how school is going. You can read portions of that interview at the bottom of this page.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;How did you guys start making movies together?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;It was kind of a gradual process. Justin met Austin and me in a community theater production about six years ago and we hit it off instantly. It was around that time that my brother and I found our parents' camera and began tinkering with it, making silly short movies just to pass the time. Justin was interested and we soon became “movie-making friends,” and since then we've just... never stopped. We met Andrew about two years ago and he started making some movies with us. Justin moved away, but we're still really close friends and we all make films on our own as well as together over vacations and such. It's weird how it happened. Our personalities just sort of clicked.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Your productivity level is amazing, especially when you consider how much care went into the making of each film. How do you stay so productive?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Well, thank you! Um... I guess the reason we've been so productive is because filmmaking is basically all we do. It's our life... pretty much. When we started making movies back when we were in the sixth grade we were just doing it for fun and, to be honest, none of them were really that good. But as time went by we got more serious about our films and pretty soon it became not only a hobby, but also a passion. Now it seems like we never stop making new movies. We're just always coming up with new ideas and making more shorts: both for school and for fun. We're really passionate about what we do, and for us, there's nothing better than working on a new film.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;A lot of your films were shot at Lansing High. Talk about filming at school.&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Contrary to how it may appear, filming at school isn't really that fun of an experience. There're always so many schedules and obstacles to work around and more often than not it turns out to be a pretty stressful situation. But the students and staff couldn't be better. It's surprising how supportive and cooperative they are, and we're never at a shortage of kids and teachers willing to be in our films. It really is great to have such strong support not only from our friends and families, but also from our school.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;I’m a Wichita native, so I know how flat and boring the Midwest can be – which is why I’m so impressed by the exteriors in your movies. How do you find good locations, and how are you able to make the Sunflower State look so bright and colorful?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;You got it spot on: very flat and very boring. There was a large time span when all we seemed to do was mope around complaining about how we wished we lived somewhere else so that we could have access to “prettier” places to shoot. But when we finally stopped whining and actually looked around, we happened to find quite a few good locations. Plus, some of the movies were filmed in Oklahoma (also flat and boring, from what I hear) when Justin lived there for a short time. I can't recall how we found each and every location; in fact, most of them seemed to just show up. Some places we weren't even supposed to film at. In the middle of shooting Mr. Carnival Man some people approached us and let us know that we were on private property and that we weren't allowed to be there. Fortunately for us, the nice people didn't care much and let us finish filming (thank you!). And while filming Through the Hole in the Fence, Justin was threatened by a group of rather intimidating people, all sporting shotguns. Good thing for Justin they were nice as well and let him continue filming. As for the bright, vibrant colors, these are usually the result of filters. We've been lucky enough to have access to some pretty good cameras and editing software, which have really improved the aesthetics of our work. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Talk about your production arsenal. What cameras and editing equipment do you use?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Most of our films have been shot with a Sony HDR SR7, but recently we've had access to a Canon XHA1 and a Canon XL2 that are amazing. All of our films are edited with a mixture of Ulead Video Studio Pro 8, Adobe Premier Pro CS3, and Final Cut Pro.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;One of things that’s notable about your work is how complex the sound design is. Why is sound so important?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;For our movies, we view the visuals as 49 percent of the final product, and the sound as 51 percent. Sound is a hugely important part of our films, and all movies in general, for that matter. It's what carries most movies along. If you watched any one of our films with the sound muted, I'm pretty sure you'd lose interest rather quickly. We spend a great deal of time editing the film, but the majority of editing time is spent on the sound. And yes, it is often very complex. We get really excited when editing with sounds: we always look for the weirdest sounds that we can find and then add them in somewhere. It's a really fun part, but also the hardest. A movie's feel can completely change based on the sound alone.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Some of your films seem inspired by David Lynch. For instance, take this very Lynchian dialogue exchange in Postmortem:&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;i&gt;&lt;b&gt;&amp;quot;You know, there was a bird in my car today.&amp;quot;&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/i&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;i&gt;&lt;b&gt;&amp;quot;Was it red?&amp;quot;&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/i&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;i&gt;&lt;b&gt;&amp;quot;No, it was a blue bird.&amp;quot;&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/i&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;i&gt;&lt;b&gt;&amp;quot;Oh.&amp;quot;&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/i&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;What is it about David Lynch that inspires you, and what are some of your favorite David Lynch films?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I'm glad that you noticed. We happen to really, really like David Lynch. I think what inspires us most about him is the fact that he does what he wants, how he wants, and doesn't seem to mind if others don't like it or disagree. He is completely original and his films are unlike anything we've ever seen. One of our favorite movies is Mulholland Drive. We love it. It's so complex, so confusing, and strange, and beautiful all at once. It's hard to describe. INLAND EMPIRE is up there too, but it's definitely the Lynch film that we understand the least. We also love Eraserhead and are huge fans of the Twin Peaks series. Some of his earlier short films are also wonderful (The Alphabet and The Grandmother, for example.) He has this really cool way of blending comedy and the bizarre into something completely unique. He's definitely one of our biggest influences. And there's actually a strange little story about that bit of dialogue. Austin and I were riding in an Airport bus to be taken back to our car when I overheard the driver discussing with another driver over their walkie-talkies. They were talking about birds. Red birds and blues birds and birds in their cars. We thought it was funny. We thought it was sad. The perfect material for a strange little film.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Pop Spoon represents a real step forward for Fetus Films. Talk about how you came up with this character, and how you got Chase Horseman to do the score.&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Pop Spoon is actually based on a true story. Sort of. One of Austin's teachers told the class once that when she was little, she had an imaginary friend named Pop Spoon who looked exactly like her. Austin thought the name was creepy and mentioned it to me and before long, I had written a script and we had made the movie. Of course we embellished the story a bit. I don't think Austin's teacher's imaginary friend was homicidal. We're really proud of Pop Spoon and we agree that it's a step forward in our films. I think what really sets it apart from our other movies is Chase Horseman's score. Chase goes to school with us and has expressed interest in making music for us for quite some time. At the beginning of the school year, Austin, Andrew, and I began working on a full-length movie called I.Q. for our Video Productions Class and we asked Chase to score the film. So he's been working on that for a while now and recently asked if we had any side projects he could help with. We gave him Pop Spoon and let him do whatever with it and when he brought it back, Austin and I were so excited. We couldn't be happier with what he did for the film. We plan on working closely with Chase in the future. He's really great at what he does.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;If Pop Spoon and the evil Posse dolls got into a fight, who would win?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I think the Posse dolls would win. As cool and creepy as Pop Spoon is, he's really sensitive at heart. He just wants to be accepted. The Posse dolls, on the other hand, are really mad about what happened to them and they're going to do whatever it takes to get revenge. While they're out making lonely girls go crazy, Pop Spoon's probably sitting in the corner complaining about how no one believes in him. Then again, it could go the other way. That would be an interesting fight indeed.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Future plans?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The immediate future: film school. Justin has already finished the first semester of his freshman year at NYU film school. Austin, Andrew, and I have applied to quite a few film schools including USC, NYU, and UCLA. We plan to learn as much as we can and build our knowledge of cinema arts at these schools in hopes to perhaps “make it” someday. But I think that each of us knows that, in the end, whether we “make it” or not, we'll continue making movies. Filmmaking is who we are. It's what we do. And there's nothing we want more than to make movies for the rest of our lives. We just want to keep doing what we do, and we can't wait to see what comes next.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;When we last spoke, we discussed your future plans. Can you give us an update?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Justin just started his sophomore year at NYU Film School and he's really loving it. Andrew is attending Webster University in St. Louis majoring in Film Production and Austin and I are attending USC School of Cinematic Arts, both of us majoring in Cinema-Television Production. We love it. It's so amazing. We're learning so much and having such a great time and we couldn't be happier.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Tell us about I.Q.&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;It's an hour and twenty minutes long, we worked on it for 344 consecutive days (including the entirety of our senior year and most of the following summer), and we premiered it at a local movie theater for all of our friends and family. It was pretty amazing. Austin and I directed it, I wrote and filmed it, Austin edited it, and Chase Horseman did the original score. It was quite an experience. A very stressful, very long experience, but we're really proud of the final product and we learned a lot from making it. We're also selling DVD’s online with full-length commentary, deleted scenes, and bloopers.&lt;/p&gt;'
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;In the months since we last spoke to him, Patrick Boivin has been a busy man. His wild popularity on YouTube drew the attention of major recording artists and advertising agents, and he’s since directed commercials with Tony Hawk and music videos with Iggy Pop. Oh, and he had a kid – talk about productivity! In this follow-up to our 2008 interview, we discuss how Boivin has matured as an artist, two of his new films, and his exciting upcoming projects.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;The last time we spoke, you said you were getting out of the stop-motion business. But since then you’ve released &lt;i&gt;Street Fighter, Bboy Joker, Bruce Lee vs Iron Man&lt;/i&gt; and &lt;i&gt;Condoms are Bad?&lt;/i&gt; Explain yourself, sir.&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I was pretty convinced at the time. But then, as you noticed, I changed my mind. In fact, I’m split in two realities. The first one is that I wanna make movies, and the movies I dream of are mostly with actors. But the movie industry in Canada allows only a few directors to live off of directing movies, and I’m not one of them. Therefore, I need another job to make money. That’s my second reality. For years, I’ve been directing TV commercials. I gradually became very frustrated with all the pretentious structure of this “world”, and I wanted badly to be able to extricate myself from it. But it was good money and it gave me a lot of free time to do my personal creations. Then came YouTube, which led to me doing stop-motion. I quickly understood that online popularity could bring me international business.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;That’s why I created &lt;i&gt;Street Fighter&lt;/i&gt; for YouTube. I knew that it would be the first real video game created specifically for Youtube, and that idea really excited me. My goal was for it to do a million views in a month, and it made almost 3 million! So just to disprove some “beginner’s luck” theories, I quickly came up with &lt;i&gt;Bboy Joker&lt;/i&gt;. And then, I began to have a lot of job offers from all around the world, which was nothing close to what I was hoping. With three weeks off, I gave birth to Iron &lt;i&gt;Man vs Bruce Lee&lt;/i&gt;. This other hit really brought me amazing opportunities. (I’m now represented by Circle of Confusion). Then I was pissed off by what the Pope said about condoms, so I took a long weekend to puke out &lt;i&gt;Condoms are bad?&lt;/i&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Then I created two music videos in stop-motion: One for the French group Indochine and the other for Iggy Pop. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;I had the opportunity to see two films that you promised would be on the same level as &lt;i&gt;Radio&lt;/i&gt;, and I have to say, you definitely delivered on that promise! Let’s talk about &lt;i&gt;Le Queloune&lt;/i&gt; first. What drew you to the zombie/horror genre?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Like most independent male movie makers, my first projects were about zombies and horror stuff. In a way, it’s an easy beat, and you don’t need that much of a story or good actors. Fifteen years later, I felt like revisiting that style, but with a different approach. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;This is basically a zombie origin story, but what’s unique about this one is that it’s told entirely from the zombie’s perspective. What excited you about telling a story from a zombie’s POV?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;When you think about it, the “zombie” is an excellent movie subject, yet there’s not much you can do with. You’re bound to two or three simple rules and that’s it. So with &lt;i&gt;Le Queloune&lt;/i&gt;, I wanted to take a look at the possible feelings of the zombie, waking up to discover that the only thing he likes to put his teeth in is human flesh.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;You've used a killer clown before, in &lt;i&gt;The Death of Neoliberalism&lt;/i&gt; (aka &lt;i&gt;Happy Meal&lt;/i&gt;). Why do you think clowns and horror mix so well?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;As human beings, there are things that we learn to trust. There are things that are supposed to be funny, gentle and kind. If those things suddenly become evil, your brain doesn’t understand and tells you to get the hell away!&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;i&gt;Happy Meal&lt;/i&gt; was just an exercise with a quite simple story. The icon of Ronald McDonald’s was an easy beat. Everybody knows him and he is supposed to be everyone’s friend. The fact that I have two films with clowns is a coincidence; I could try to give you a good reason but I would be lying.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;As for &lt;i&gt;Le Queloune&lt;/i&gt;, the idea wasn’t to do a horror movie. I first wrote the script about a normal guy waking up from the dead. The clown idea came later. In a way, I was creating a sarcastic comedy, and I thought a zombie clown to be funny.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;There’s an amazing shot near the beginning of &lt;i&gt;Le Queloune&lt;/i&gt; where some kids are making Coke explode by mixing it with Mentos, and the camera follows the soda as it drips down to Patrice’s grave. How did you pull that shot off?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;It was easy, in fact. We built an 8 foot long “dirt track” that was standing straight at something like 75 degrees, and simply let the cola flow down. As for the camera getting in the ground, you have to know that the hole and the stone were not real, and were standing 2 feet over the ground. So when I made my camera move, I simply went down to film the “under set”. The “inner circle” was also just a box, and I shot with the appropriate move. Then, I combined all of them in post production.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Okay, let’s talk about the second film: &lt;i&gt;This and Everything Else&lt;/i&gt;. Did you make a conscious decision to try something more naturalistic?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Absolutely. It is the kind of approach I’m interested in now. You see, I did a lot of “artificial” looking stuff in the past, and now when I look back at those movies, the big “style search” always bugs me. You talked about &lt;i&gt;Radio&lt;/i&gt; earlier and it’s a good example. It’s full of transition FX and weird textures that do suit it well, but I can’t look at it without being distracted by those unnecessary moments. Having said that, I don’t know how I would do it differently now. I probably wouldn’t write the story the same way. When you’re involved in the writing of something you will direct, it dramatically affects the storytelling.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I will keep creating more “plastic” shorts, like music videos, but the cinema I wanna make involves a more close to real life feeling. Yet, it doesn’t stop me from putting some “colors” in it, if the story allows it.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;If we speak about &lt;i&gt;This and Everything Else&lt;/i&gt;, all the SFX treatment is part of the story that I wrote with this treatment in mind.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;The movie starts out as a straightforward drama, but then moves into surreal and comedic territory when you introduce the two narrators. How do you avoid losing the audience when you shift gears like that, and did you have any films in mind to help guide you through that?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The movie I hade in mind was another one I made a couple of years ago.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;A couple is sitting at a table in a restaurant. The girl is angry and screaming at him. While he listens to her, he draws on his napkin a little “him”, and a little “her”. Then as she keeps screaming, the drawing comes to life, and the little cartoon girl screams at the little cartoon guy. And then, the real guy draws a little chainsaw next to his alter ego, who takes it and kills his little cartoon girlfriend. At the same time, the real boyfriend gets splashed by blood coming from his girlfriend.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;To answer the first part of the question: I figured it would work if it looked like long sequences where you get from the real world to the “fake” one. And it still works for me, so I guess it does for a couple of people.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;The young couple and their group of friends are very realistic. Did you use experiences from real life in writing the screenplay?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Completely. That whole movie is based on real events I lived. Most of the time, we feel that little things in life aren’t worth telling, but I think we could build great exciting movies about little details. We all experience little things that most of us will never talk about. Here’s an example:&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Throughout all my life, I occasionally noticed that I had strange translucent things crossing my sight – most of the time when I was looking at the sky during the day. I remember thinking about it for a while, trying to figure out if it was an unusual thing. But in all my 35 years, I never discussed the thing with anybody. Two month ago, I was watching an episode of &lt;i&gt;Family Guy&lt;/i&gt; and they made a joke about this, calling those little things “floaters”. It was not a particularly funny gag, but I laughed my lungs out!&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Talk about the sex scenes. How do you earn the actors' trust on set?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I personally think that if you want to make a good movie, you need to get everybody’s trust on the set, sex scene or not. I feel that movie making should be a team business, and not a dictatorship. You need a leader of course, and he better know where he’s going, but every other member of the team must feel that he is important in the process. When you’re able to do so, everybody is better at what he does, including the actors.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;I love the big argument scene where the trashcan lid rolls into view. What’s the significance of the trashcan lid to you?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I don’t know how other movie makers get their ideas, but for me, it is most of the time a kind of “collage”.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;When I was a kid, the trashcan lid disappeared one day. So my parents bought another trashcan, and they chained the lid so he wouldn’t escape. It’s been 20 years now and the lid is still prisoner. I never made a big deal out of it, but somehow the connections in my brain about that fact remained intact.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;When I wrote that argument scene, I needed something so special that both lovers would automatically “drop their weapons”. Then came the idea of that lid, free like the wind, ending his 20 years’ escapade at that precisely good moment. “Who needs a shrink when you have free lids traveling the world?!”&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Last fall you were in post-production on a 30-minute science-fiction film. How’s that coming along?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I just finished the film. From my point of view, it’s pretty good. This one will probably take the classic road, getting on the screens of a couple of festivals, and then in a few months, I’ll put it on FILMNET!&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;What’s the status of your feature projects, and of your career in general?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I’m actually doing pretty good! As a living, I do great stuff for big companies. I also do music videos for cool artists. As for movies, I’m working on several feature films. Both of them are in the process of being financed, which means I might have two big projects to work on next summer. I might also do a couple more animations, just for fun… but maybe not. I’m a new father now and I wanna make the most out of it!&lt;/p&gt;'
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;Conducted in the fall of 2008, this is the first of a two-part interview with Patrick Boivin, one of FilmNet’s top contributors. Boivin’s career has seen a meteoric rise in the months since this interview took place, so it’s fun to go back and see what his concerns as artist were then. This was before he started getting huge commercial and music video offers – when he was basically working on his own, producing some of the most eye-popping shorts the Web has ever seen. We discussed his process as an ultra-independent filmmaker, the different challenges presented by animation as opposed to live action, and his dreams for the future – many of which, by now, have come magically true!&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;What first sparked your interest in film? Were you making other kinds of art at the time?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;My first approach with art was comic books. I learned to draw just to be able to tell stories. Then I discovered that it was faster to tell stories with a camera. By chance, I came to the cinema when it was changing and becoming more accessible with DV cameras and computer editing. So I learned to use those tools as they were developed. Also, since I didn't go to film school, nobody told me I wasn't supposed to do everything. In a way, that became an advantage, because I can now perfectly understand every step in the process and, sometimes, create films completely on my own for fun.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Your films are visually striking. Describe the process of working with your crew. How do you translate the ideas in your head onto the screen?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Actually, for lots of my recent work, I've been doing it on my own. But I usually make very precise plans, and then I go shoot my film once with a mini DV camera, alone with an actor, and then edit it as a first draft. If I'm happy with it, I use it as a prototype and show it to every key member of the crew. Then I choose stills from the film to build a precise storyboard for the actual shoot.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;What different challenges are presented by working in animation as opposed to working in live-action?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I have to answer that question as two different guys. The first one is Patrick Boivin, who prepares a lot for his live-action projects. The second one is Monsieur Monsieur Boivin, a retarded kid who animates toys for the Web just to have a reason to buy and destroy some. If I have an idea, I buy the toy and begin to think about all the shots without trying them first. Since I've done a lot of directing, having a one- or two-minute animation story with all the shots clear in my mind is easy. And so I animate a shot each time I manage to find an hour or two alone in my apartment. I edit the story progressively and change things throughout the process. A real animator would have a great time laughing at me when I do my thing over a corner of my dining table. The bad thing about this is that I sometimes regret choices that I made earlier. When I really regret a shot, I do it again. But since it's something I do for fun, I'm not too hard on myself and I include a lot of mistakes in the final cut.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Some of your films have political themes and iconography, like the Confederate flags in Jazz with a General Problem and the brain dead politician in The Bean. Do you like mixing art and politics?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I'm really interested in what's going on in the world today. An important part of my day–to-day thinking is about politics and human beings. So when I develop a story, I think those concerns naturally come up. And, of course, those concerns sometimes provoke stories. But it's not something that I feel forced to do. It's just part of the process, and having good ideas is so difficult that I don't trash one for the sake of political correctness. As for the Confederate flag in my last animation, it all began with the desire to invent a Transformer. So I had to find myself a cool car! I'm 34 years old, and when I was a kid, my favorite car was The General Lee on &amp;quot;The Dukes of Hazzard.&amp;quot; I figured from the start that the Confederate aspect of the car would embarrass some people. I even thought of picking the voice of a known black actor to make my General Lee talk, just to add some more confusion. By the time I was ready to animate the segments where he talks, I thought of Michael Madsen, who plays the evil Mr. Blonde in &lt;i&gt;Reservoir Dogs&lt;/i&gt;. So General Lee, the Confederate decepticon, is in fact Mr. Blonde, the evil maniac of &lt;i&gt;Reservoir Dogs&lt;/i&gt;, killing one of my favorite autobots with his Confederate flag – an unfair weapon in a fist fight. All of this is to say that when you feel you have a great idea, you can easily lose yourself in explanations and justifications. In the end, I personally think that all that matters is to be comfortable with your own sensibility. Doing things to please everybody ends up watering it all down.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;The National Endowment for the Arts is underfunded in this country. Talk about the Canadian system and how government grants have helped to fund your films.&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I'm not well informed about the arts funding system in other countries, so I won't try to make comparisons. But I feel that in Canada, we've managed to find good ways to help artists over the past 20 years. But it's really hard to get funding for any kind of project because I feel the cultural budget is not enough. Also, I'm living in a French reality, here in the province of Quebec, where the market is small. We are a bit over 7 million, and our French movies don't travel much, so the private funding is almost nonexistent. And, most importantly, the actual government is engaged in a cutting campaign over cultural sector funding. That's what my film LES COUPURES, ÇA TUE LA CULTURE is all about. It was a commercial made just before the federal elections we had in Canada this October. Personally, 90% of what I have done for the last 15 years has been independently financed.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;You were involved in a TV show called Phylactere Cola. Tell us about it.&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&amp;quot;Phylactere Cola&amp;quot; was a French-Canadian TV show that was broadcast in 2002-2003. There were nine of us doing everything, from the set building to the acting. I was the director, DP, cameraman, editor and FX coordinator. One of the team members, Strob, specialized in 3D and makeup. Another one, Eric Pfalzgraf, was the sound designer and music composer. Everyone had a specialty. An important thing to mention is that we were all cartoonists. That's how we met at first. Since we started the project as a hobby many years before doing it for TV, we have made over 400 sketches. That was my school.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;There’s a DVD for sale on the Phylactere Cola website. What’s on the DVD?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;It's the complete second season of the TV show, plus some extras like making-of.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Radio is one of my favorite short films ever. Where did the idea for the script come from?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;A: Wow! I'm glad you appreciate it! One day during a car ride, a friend of mine – who was also a team member of Phylactère Cola – told me he had an idea about a guy hearing news from a broken radio, but he wasn't sure about doing something with it. It was my birthday, and I asked him to give me this idea. Ten drafts later, I was shooting it in a five-day production. Eric Pfalzgraf took care of all the audio parts, including the beautiful music he made with another great composer named Alexis Lemay.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Name some filmmakers who inspire you.&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;It changes a lot. I think the work of Roy Andersson, who did &lt;i&gt;Songs from the Second Floor&lt;/i&gt;, and Paul Thomas Anderson is what I'm going to be looking forward to the most in the next years. But to be honest, I think Tom Waits is my greatest inspiration. Oh, and my all-time favorite movie is &lt;i&gt;8 1/2&lt;/i&gt; by Federico Fellini.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;What are you working on now?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I just finished two shorts on the same level as &lt;i&gt;Radio&lt;/i&gt;. One is a love story. The other is the story of a dead clown discovering that he became a zombie. And I'm actually working on the editing of a 30-minute science-fiction film with a lot of FX work. I'm also working on four feature films. The more conventional one is scheduled to be shot in May. As for the stop-motion, I think I'm done with it for a while. It started as a funny hobby, but the last one took me a lot more time than I had planned. There are many things I'd like to experiment with in life, and I already know that if I managed to live another 50 years, it won't be enough. So when I do something, I try to be as intense as possible, which sometimes leaves big gaps in my responsible adult life.&lt;/p&gt;'
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;Tim Clague is an award-winning filmmaker, writer and independent film advocate who's been active in film and television productions for more than a decade. The Brit got his start in 1998 with &lt;i&gt;Eight&lt;/i&gt;, a short about an 8-year-old boy's love of soccer. It was directed by Stephen Daldry &lt;i&gt;(The Hours)&lt;/i&gt;. In the decade since, Clague has written and directed several films, many of which can be seen on FilmNet. His philosophy is to collect styles from a variety of sources, and to create films that are both though-provoking and funny – and conversation-starters. He spoke with FilmNet about writing, the Film 2.0 movement and the recent film adaptation of &lt;i&gt;Watchmen&lt;/i&gt;.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Describe the writing process. Do you write quickly? Do you come up with bios for your characters?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I am not particularly fast but I do have several scripts on the go at once. I don't do character bios or backgrounds or histories or any other spinoff materials. I use a process I call storydust. I call it storydust as it mirrors how stars form from interstellar dust. Dust and fragments of rock are drawn together by gravity over time, getting larger and larger. Eventually the mass becomes so great it gets hot to the point of igniting and a glowing star is formed. But what about stories? Well, instead you collect ideas about a story, images, thoughts, dialogue, locations – anything. After a while, they start to collect and clump together and slowly a story forms. Eventually it collects enough weight that it hangs together and eventually a genius bright glowing narrative is in front of you. But both stars and stories take time to form with this method! But both are beautiful.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;What was it like working with Stephen Daldry, the Oscar-nominated director of &lt;i&gt;Billy Elliot&lt;/i&gt; and &lt;i&gt;The Reader&lt;/i&gt;?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I worked with Stephen as he was selected as director for a script competition I won. The film was called &lt;i&gt;Eight&lt;/i&gt; and it is a 12-minute short about a young boy and his love of football. It was his first film but he was already a highly regarded and respected theatre director who brought a lot of cinematic techniques to the stage. He is very focused and very collaborative. He uses a method where he keeps asking questions to really understand what a writer is trying to get at - a good technique.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;How is Film 2.0 changing independent filmmaking?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;In every aspect. Writing with the audience. Shooting for them. Sharing with them. Funded by them. Spread by them. All of it.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Describe how you collect styles from different media.&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I think most filmmakers in the past have done this, but not always talked about it. I mean – don't copy shots and techniques from other films. Gain inspiration from everywhere else – comics, paintings, music, lyrics, poems, things you find on the street, blogs, overheard conversations, the web, sculpture – just collect it.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Consecration is a visually striking film. How did you shoot it?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;We used, what was then, a very small camera. You can go even smaller now. In fact, it was so small we had to make a casing for it so the cameraman could operate it. Now you can get cameras where you can beam the signal with no leads required at all. And one filmmaker (who lost an eye) is having one fitted as a false eye.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Watermelon is great (both the fruit and the film). How did you shoot that one?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;This is, for me, an interesting film in how we created it. Everyone was involved in pre-production. So the music was composed beforehand and we played that on set. The sound designer read the script and talked about the sounds he would like - so we shot images to match those sounds. And so on. The most collaborative way to make a film ever! However, if I could do it again, I would do the same technique with the script and tighten it up.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;You produced a film called &lt;i&gt;God Vs. The Advertising Standards Authority&lt;/i&gt;. Tell us about that.&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;This was a film I made on Boxing Day in five hours. I do it every year – instead of sending out Christmas cards, I make a Christmas film. But I didn't have a camera this year, so I screen-captured the performance instead. It is about a vicar who has a complaint made against him via the ASA and has to rework his Christmas poster in Photoshop so that it only tells provable facts. Ten days later it happened in real life when the Atheist bus poster campaign was referred to the ASA by a Christian group. They complained that the poster that said &quot;There probably is no God so stop worrying and enjoy life&quot; was untrue. So I rode the wave of the zeitgeist for a week.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;You're working on a pro-atheist dramatic film. What's it about, and what effect do you hope it will have on the viewer?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;It is a 30-minute script about an ad exec who realizes that all his techniques are also used by the church. His brother, a chaplain, is unhappy with this. So it is a drama about two brothers at the heart of it. I hope it just keeps people questioning things.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;Circumference is supposed to be &quot;the world's first free motion picture&quot;...&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Well, it was going to be – funded by adverts. But the recession has put paid to that, we feel. But we still hope to make it anyway in a low-budget style.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;As an Alan Moore fan, what did you think of the &lt;i&gt;Watchmen&lt;/i&gt; movie?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Excellent – even though I feel I shouldn't like it!&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;b&gt;What are you working on now these days?&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;i&gt;Delete Friend&lt;/i&gt;? A children's TV series. After deliberately spreading a Facebook virus, Jade must visit every one of her online friends to apologize. But is everyone who they seem? &lt;i&gt;My Name is Earl&lt;/i&gt; – for tweens.&lt;/p&gt;'
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  13. [72.37 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `v`.*, `vf`.`featured_video_description`, `vf`.`featured_video_name`, `vf`.`priority`, `vf`.`featured_type_id` FROM `videos` AS `v` LEFT JOIN `video_featured` AS `vf` ON vf.video_id = v.video_id WHERE (1 AND v.is_published_video = 1 AND v.is_deleted_video = 0 AND v.is_hidden_video = 0 AND v.is_rejected_video = 0 AND vf.featured_type_id = 1 AND v.owner_id = '194') ORDER BY `v`.`dt_published_video` DESC
  14. [30.89 ms] SELECT `users`.* FROM `users` WHERE (user_id='84')
  15. [24.98 ms] SELECT `rg`.* FROM `review_genres` AS `rg` WHERE (genre_id = '11')
  16. [400.13 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `r`.*, `vr`.`video_id`, `cr`.`channel_id`, `ur`.`user_id`, `mr`.`movie_id` FROM `reviews` AS `r` LEFT JOIN `video__reviews` AS `vr` ON vr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `channel__reviews` AS `cr` ON cr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `user__reviews` AS `ur` ON ur.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `movie__reviews` AS `mr` ON mr.review_id = r.review_id WHERE (1 AND r.`reviewer_id` = 84 AND r.is_published_review = 1 AND r.is_deleted_review = 0) ORDER BY `r`.`dt_published_review` DESC
  17. [8.55 ms] SELECT `users`.* FROM `users` WHERE (user_id='46')
  18. [33.22 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `v`.*, `vf`.`featured_video_description`, `vf`.`featured_video_name`, `vf`.`priority`, `vf`.`featured_type_id` FROM `videos` AS `v` LEFT JOIN `video_featured` AS `vf` ON vf.video_id = v.video_id WHERE (1 AND v.is_published_video = 1 AND v.is_deleted_video = 0 AND v.is_hidden_video = 0 AND v.is_rejected_video = 0 AND vf.featured_type_id = 1 AND v.owner_id = '46') ORDER BY `v`.`dt_published_video` DESC
  19. [32.02 ms] SELECT `users`.* FROM `users` WHERE (user_id='84')
  20. [32.08 ms] SELECT `rg`.* FROM `review_genres` AS `rg` WHERE (genre_id = '2')
  21. [494.24 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `r`.*, `vr`.`video_id`, `cr`.`channel_id`, `ur`.`user_id`, `mr`.`movie_id` FROM `reviews` AS `r` LEFT JOIN `video__reviews` AS `vr` ON vr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `channel__reviews` AS `cr` ON cr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `user__reviews` AS `ur` ON ur.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `movie__reviews` AS `mr` ON mr.review_id = r.review_id WHERE (1 AND r.`reviewer_id` = 84 AND r.is_published_review = 1 AND r.is_deleted_review = 0) ORDER BY `r`.`dt_published_review` DESC
  22. [20.8 ms] SELECT `users`.* FROM `users` WHERE (user_id='540')
  23. [15.69 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `v`.*, `vf`.`featured_video_description`, `vf`.`featured_video_name`, `vf`.`priority`, `vf`.`featured_type_id` FROM `videos` AS `v` LEFT JOIN `video_featured` AS `vf` ON vf.video_id = v.video_id WHERE (1 AND v.is_published_video = 1 AND v.is_deleted_video = 0 AND v.is_hidden_video = 0 AND v.is_rejected_video = 0 AND vf.featured_type_id = 1 AND v.owner_id = '540') ORDER BY `v`.`dt_published_video` DESC
  24. [11.21 ms] SELECT `users`.* FROM `users` WHERE (user_id='84')
  25. [32.78 ms] SELECT `rg`.* FROM `review_genres` AS `rg` WHERE (genre_id = '2')
  26. [319.61 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `r`.*, `vr`.`video_id`, `cr`.`channel_id`, `ur`.`user_id`, `mr`.`movie_id` FROM `reviews` AS `r` LEFT JOIN `video__reviews` AS `vr` ON vr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `channel__reviews` AS `cr` ON cr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `user__reviews` AS `ur` ON ur.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `movie__reviews` AS `mr` ON mr.review_id = r.review_id WHERE (1 AND r.`reviewer_id` = 84 AND r.is_published_review = 1 AND r.is_deleted_review = 0) ORDER BY `r`.`dt_published_review` DESC
  27. [25.47 ms] SELECT `users`.* FROM `users` WHERE (user_id='540')
  28. [27.38 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `v`.*, `vf`.`featured_video_description`, `vf`.`featured_video_name`, `vf`.`priority`, `vf`.`featured_type_id` FROM `videos` AS `v` LEFT JOIN `video_featured` AS `vf` ON vf.video_id = v.video_id WHERE (1 AND v.is_published_video = 1 AND v.is_deleted_video = 0 AND v.is_hidden_video = 0 AND v.is_rejected_video = 0 AND vf.featured_type_id = 1 AND v.owner_id = '540') ORDER BY `v`.`dt_published_video` DESC
  29. [13.21 ms] SELECT `users`.* FROM `users` WHERE (user_id='84')
  30. [16.08 ms] SELECT `rg`.* FROM `review_genres` AS `rg` WHERE (genre_id = '4')
  31. [305.64 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `r`.*, `vr`.`video_id`, `cr`.`channel_id`, `ur`.`user_id`, `mr`.`movie_id` FROM `reviews` AS `r` LEFT JOIN `video__reviews` AS `vr` ON vr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `channel__reviews` AS `cr` ON cr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `user__reviews` AS `ur` ON ur.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `movie__reviews` AS `mr` ON mr.review_id = r.review_id WHERE (1 AND r.`reviewer_id` = 84 AND r.is_published_review = 1 AND r.is_deleted_review = 0) ORDER BY `r`.`dt_published_review` DESC
  32. [30.19 ms] SELECT `users`.* FROM `users` WHERE (user_id='51')
  33. [26.7 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `v`.*, `vf`.`featured_video_description`, `vf`.`featured_video_name`, `vf`.`priority`, `vf`.`featured_type_id` FROM `videos` AS `v` LEFT JOIN `video_featured` AS `vf` ON vf.video_id = v.video_id WHERE (1 AND v.is_published_video = 1 AND v.is_deleted_video = 0 AND v.is_hidden_video = 0 AND v.is_rejected_video = 0 AND vf.featured_type_id = 1 AND v.owner_id = '51') ORDER BY `v`.`dt_published_video` DESC
  34. [23.43 ms] SELECT `users`.* FROM `users` WHERE (user_id='84')
  35. [0.98 ms] SELECT `rg`.* FROM `review_genres` AS `rg` WHERE (genre_id = '7')
  36. [411.28 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `r`.*, `vr`.`video_id`, `cr`.`channel_id`, `ur`.`user_id`, `mr`.`movie_id` FROM `reviews` AS `r` LEFT JOIN `video__reviews` AS `vr` ON vr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `channel__reviews` AS `cr` ON cr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `user__reviews` AS `ur` ON ur.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `movie__reviews` AS `mr` ON mr.review_id = r.review_id WHERE (1 AND r.`reviewer_id` = 84 AND r.is_published_review = 1 AND r.is_deleted_review = 0) ORDER BY `r`.`dt_published_review` DESC
  37. [30.11 ms] SELECT `users`.* FROM `users` WHERE (user_id='19')
  38. [51.22 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `v`.*, `vf`.`featured_video_description`, `vf`.`featured_video_name`, `vf`.`priority`, `vf`.`featured_type_id` FROM `videos` AS `v` LEFT JOIN `video_featured` AS `vf` ON vf.video_id = v.video_id WHERE (1 AND v.is_published_video = 1 AND v.is_deleted_video = 0 AND v.is_hidden_video = 0 AND v.is_rejected_video = 0 AND vf.featured_type_id = 1 AND v.owner_id = '19') ORDER BY `v`.`dt_published_video` DESC
  39. [28.77 ms] SELECT `users`.* FROM `users` WHERE (user_id='84')
  40. [24.27 ms] SELECT `rg`.* FROM `review_genres` AS `rg` WHERE (genre_id = '2')
  41. [181.65 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `r`.*, `vr`.`video_id`, `cr`.`channel_id`, `ur`.`user_id`, `mr`.`movie_id` FROM `reviews` AS `r` LEFT JOIN `video__reviews` AS `vr` ON vr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `channel__reviews` AS `cr` ON cr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `user__reviews` AS `ur` ON ur.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `movie__reviews` AS `mr` ON mr.review_id = r.review_id WHERE (1 AND r.`reviewer_id` = 84 AND r.is_published_review = 1 AND r.is_deleted_review = 0) ORDER BY `r`.`dt_published_review` DESC
  42. [12.94 ms] SELECT `users`.* FROM `users` WHERE (user_id='66')
  43. [22.5 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `v`.*, `vf`.`featured_video_description`, `vf`.`featured_video_name`, `vf`.`priority`, `vf`.`featured_type_id` FROM `videos` AS `v` LEFT JOIN `video_featured` AS `vf` ON vf.video_id = v.video_id WHERE (1 AND v.is_published_video = 1 AND v.is_deleted_video = 0 AND v.is_hidden_video = 0 AND v.is_rejected_video = 0 AND vf.featured_type_id = 1 AND v.owner_id = '66') ORDER BY `v`.`dt_published_video` DESC
  44. [17.24 ms] SELECT `users`.* FROM `users` WHERE (user_id='84')
  45. [2.15 ms] SELECT `rg`.* FROM `review_genres` AS `rg` WHERE (genre_id = '2')
  46. [204.63 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `r`.*, `vr`.`video_id`, `cr`.`channel_id`, `ur`.`user_id`, `mr`.`movie_id` FROM `reviews` AS `r` LEFT JOIN `video__reviews` AS `vr` ON vr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `channel__reviews` AS `cr` ON cr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `user__reviews` AS `ur` ON ur.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `movie__reviews` AS `mr` ON mr.review_id = r.review_id WHERE (1 AND r.`reviewer_id` = 84 AND r.is_published_review = 1 AND r.is_deleted_review = 0) ORDER BY `r`.`dt_published_review` DESC
  47. [33.42 ms] SELECT `users`.* FROM `users` WHERE (user_id='66')
  48. [9.82 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `v`.*, `vf`.`featured_video_description`, `vf`.`featured_video_name`, `vf`.`priority`, `vf`.`featured_type_id` FROM `videos` AS `v` LEFT JOIN `video_featured` AS `vf` ON vf.video_id = v.video_id WHERE (1 AND v.is_published_video = 1 AND v.is_deleted_video = 0 AND v.is_hidden_video = 0 AND v.is_rejected_video = 0 AND vf.featured_type_id = 1 AND v.owner_id = '66') ORDER BY `v`.`dt_published_video` DESC
  49. [45.18 ms] SELECT `users`.* FROM `users` WHERE (user_id='84')
  50. [20.47 ms] SELECT `rg`.* FROM `review_genres` AS `rg` WHERE (genre_id = '2')
  51. [521.68 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `r`.*, `vr`.`video_id`, `cr`.`channel_id`, `ur`.`user_id`, `mr`.`movie_id` FROM `reviews` AS `r` LEFT JOIN `video__reviews` AS `vr` ON vr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `channel__reviews` AS `cr` ON cr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `user__reviews` AS `ur` ON ur.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `movie__reviews` AS `mr` ON mr.review_id = r.review_id WHERE (1 AND r.`reviewer_id` = 84 AND r.is_published_review = 1 AND r.is_deleted_review = 0) ORDER BY `r`.`dt_published_review` DESC
  52. [82.82 ms] SELECT `users`.* FROM `users` WHERE (user_id='15')
  53. [63.27 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `v`.*, `vf`.`featured_video_description`, `vf`.`featured_video_name`, `vf`.`priority`, `vf`.`featured_type_id` FROM `videos` AS `v` LEFT JOIN `video_featured` AS `vf` ON vf.video_id = v.video_id WHERE (1 AND v.is_published_video = 1 AND v.is_deleted_video = 0 AND v.is_hidden_video = 0 AND v.is_rejected_video = 0 AND vf.featured_type_id = 1 AND v.owner_id = '15') ORDER BY `v`.`dt_published_video` DESC
  54. [28.38 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `rg`.* FROM `review_genres` AS `rg` LEFT JOIN `reviews` AS `r` ON rg.`genre_id` = r.`genre_id` WHERE (1 AND r.`review_type_id` = 4 AND r.`is_published_review` = 1 AND r.`is_deleted_review` = 0) ORDER BY `rg`.`genre_name` ASC

File Information

146 Files Included
Total Size: 1495.1K
Basepath: /mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/settings/../../../

Application Files

/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/Bootstrap.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/channels/models/Channels.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/default/models/Assistant.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/default/models/Filters.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/reviews/controllers/ReviewsController.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/reviews/models/Movies.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/reviews/models/ReviewGenres.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/reviews/models/Reviews.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/users/models/Users.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/videos/models/Videos.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/settings/config.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/system/acl.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/system/routes.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/Controller/Plugin/Acl.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/Controller/Plugin/AjaxCheck.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/Controller/Plugin/AutoLogin.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/Controller/Plugin/FlashMessenger.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/Controller/Plugin/InmailMessageCount.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/Paginator/Adapter/DbSelect.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/View/Serializer.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/View/Xslt.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/www/index.php

Zend Library Files

/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Assert/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Exception.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Resource.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Resource/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Role.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Role/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Role/Registry.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Role/Registry/Exception.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Auth.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Auth/Storage/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Auth/Storage/Session.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Cache.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Cache/Backend.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Cache/Backend/ExtendedInterface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Cache/Backend/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Cache/Backend/Memcached.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Cache/Core.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Config.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action/Helper/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action/Helper/FlashMessenger.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action/Helper/ViewRenderer.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action/HelperBroker.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action/HelperBroker/PriorityStack.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Dispatcher/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Dispatcher/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Dispatcher/Standard.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Exception.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Front.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Plugin/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Plugin/Broker.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Plugin/ErrorHandler.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Request/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Request/Http.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Response/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Response/Http.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Rewrite.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Route.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Route/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Route/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Route/Module.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Route/Regex.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Adapter/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Adapter/Pdo/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Adapter/Pdo/Mysql.php
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/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Profiler.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Profiler/Query.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Select.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Statement.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Statement/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Statement/Pdo.php
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/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Inflector.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/PregReplace.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/StringToLower.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Word/CamelCaseToDash.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Word/CamelCaseToSeparator.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Word/Separator/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Word/SeparatorToSeparator.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Word/UnderscoreToSeparator.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Form.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Json.php
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/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Loader.php
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/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Locale/Data/Translation.php
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/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Formatter/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Formatter/Simple.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Writer/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Writer/Stream.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Paginator.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Paginator/Adapter/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Paginator/ScrollingStyle/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Paginator/ScrollingStyle/Jumping.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Registry.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Session.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Session/Abstract.php
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/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Session/Namespace.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Session/SaveHandler/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Translate.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Translate/Adapter.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Translate/Adapter/Gettext.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Uri.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Validate/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Version.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/HeadMeta.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/HeadTitle.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Placeholder/Container.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Placeholder/Container/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Placeholder/Container/Standalone.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Placeholder/Registry.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Interface.php

ZFDebug Library Files

/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Database.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Exception.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/File.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Html.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Memory.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Registry.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Text.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Time.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Variables.php

Memory Usage

Controller: 5653.82K

Custom Timers

Controller: 5520.16 ms

Overall Timers

reviews
reviews
list
Avg: 6271.76 ms / 1 requests
Min: 6271.76 ms
Max: 6271.76 ms

Reset timers by sending ZFDEBUG_RESET as a GET/POST parameter

Registered Instances

Zend_View_Helper_Placeholder_Registry => Zend_View_Helper_Placeholder_Registry Object()
acl => Zend_Acl Object()
baseDir => 'http://www.filmnet.com/'
cache => Zend_Cache_Core Object()
config => Zend_Config Object()
db => Zend_Db_Adapter_Pdo_Mysql Object()
translator => Zend_Translate Object()
copyright 1.8.0/5.2.10-2ubuntu6variables Variableshtml HTMLdatabase 54 in 4390.58 msfile 146 Filesmemory 15646K of 1024Mtime 6271.76 msregistry Registry (7)«