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An American original that sets the bar pretty high for teen comedies in 2010.

YOUTH IN REVOLT is a buoyant youth picture that smells like teen spirit. For that, we can thank the creative team behind the movie, who clearly had the right intentions (and the credentials to back them up) in bringing C.D. Payne’s cult novel to the screen. Director Miguel Arteta obviously has an affinity for outsiders (see CHUCK & BUCK and THE ...

Read more

Review by: MiamiMovieCritic

Added: 8 years ago

 

Jackson gives the novel’s rich tapestry of complex characters and relationships short shrift, instead focusing on the cinematic possibilities of Susie’s afterlife.

Directed by Peter Jackson, THE LOVELY BONES is one long bad trip of a movie – perhaps the most disastrous film adaptation of a major American novel since Brian De Palma brought Tom Wolfe’s THE BONFIRE OF THE VANITIES to the screen. Frankly, I’m surprised it didn’t work, because if anything this project seemed to represent the ideal marriage of a ...

Read more

Review by: MiamiMovieCritic

Added: 8 years ago

Symbol

Genre: Comedy

The weirdest, funniest movie in the festival.

Symbol is Japanese comic legend Hitoshi Matsumoto’s second feature, the follow up to his lovably weird, boldly alienating and completely hilarious Dai Nipponjin (aka Big Man Japan, 2007). Two seemingly unrelated stories play in parallel in the film. In one, Mexican luchador Escargot Man must face the seemingly insurmountably strong and youthful ...

Read more

Review by: thesubstream

Added: 8 years ago

 

Horse, Cowboy, Indian, Seamonster and Farmer: The Holy Story Pentangle.

A Town Called Panic is the anarchic, frenetic feature film version of the popular Belgian cartoon of the same name. Technically crude but all the better for it, the film like the cartoon is stop-motion animated using what look like (and in some cases are) the cheap plastic toy figurines that came by the dozens in bags, complete with plastic bases ...

Read more

Review by: thesubstream

Added: 8 years ago

I got to see an adventure movie. Why does that sound so weird to say?

Michael J. Bassett’s adaptation of Robert E. Howard’s Solomon Kane is the exact kind of film that I’d have somehow managed to see when I was 12 or 13 and fallen completely in love with. Thanks in part I guess to the fact that I haven’t grown up that much, I still love it. A pure, unsophisticated (in the best, most honest way) adventure film not ...

Read more

Review by: thesubstream

Added: 8 years ago

 

REC 2

Genre: Horror

Take The Lady in the Lake and add demon zombies.

Jaume Balagueró and Paco Plaza’s follow up to their 2007 sensation [REC] (remade in America as Quarantine) [REC]2 picks up the story just 15 minutes after the events of the first film. An apartment building has been sealed off (ostensibly by the Department of Health) to contain a viral outbreak inside. One that seems to be turning the occupants into...

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Review by: thesubstream

Added: 8 years ago

Girls have boobs, on their chest. That's where they are.

Ever since some young dude drank a gourd-full of hallucinogenic wasp paste and stumbled out into the barren tundra to become a man, he alone against the cruelty of nature, people have been subjecting themselves to uncomfortable extremes in the name of self discovery. People free climb sheer rock faces. People run hundred mile races through the ...

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Review by: thesubstream

Added: 8 years ago

 

I loved it, everybody else loved it, you'll love it.

Sean Byrne's The Loved Ones is a charmer for horror fans, a charmingly revolting mash up of Hostel and The People Under the Stairs, with none of the former's glitzy nihilism and enough of the latter's goofy implausibility to create a harrowing, hilarious amalgam that'll entertain the hell out of you without making you feel bad about yourself as a ...

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Review by: thesubstream

Added: 8 years ago

Now we're talking Midnight Madness. This is the stuff here man.

Building on the genre-clash crossover theme that was solidly established the first night of TIFF's Midnight Madness with the slasher flick cum teen girl comedy Jennifer's Body, programmer Colin Geddes has delivered another interesting hybrid: the futuristic, sci-fi-vampire film Daybreakers. Set 10 years into the future and after the bat-spawned ...

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Review by: thesubstream

Added: 8 years ago

 

Romero keeps surviving, and probably always will.

Zombie movie legend George A. Romero and his recent films occupy an odd niche, to say the least. Having basically invented the zombie genre while at the same time arguably perfecting it with his first film, 1968's Night of the Living Dead, Romero made two sequels that each tried to expand on the social commentary-amidst-the-carnage he pioneered in ...

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Review by: thesubstream

Added: 8 years ago

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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;YOUTH IN REVOLT is a buoyant youth picture that smells like teen spirit. For that, we can thank the creative team behind the movie, who clearly had the right intentions (and the credentials to back them up) in bringing C.D. Payne’s cult novel to the screen.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Director Miguel Arteta obviously has an affinity for outsiders (see CHUCK &amp;amp; BUCK and THE GOOD GIRL – two of the best indie pictures of the ‘00s and both written by the great Mike White.) Arteta’s collaborator on YOUTH IN REVOLT is screenwriter Gustin Nash, who also wrote the terrific teen comedy CHARLIE BARTLETT, in which a prep school brat found his true calling in life: selling pharmaceuticals to bored teenagers.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The hero of YOUTH IN REVOLT, Nick Twisp, also ends up taking a walk on the wild side, but he’s a much tamer and more hapless criminal than Master Bartlett. Annoyed at still being a virgin, Nick (Cera) meets the love of his life, Sheeni Saunders (Portia Doubleday), while on vacation with his mom (Jean Smart) and her new beau (Zack Galifianakis, the bearded idiot in THE HANGOVER). An unfortunate series of events keeps Nick from consummating his love. It doesn’t help that Sheeni has a stuck-up boyfriend (Jonathan B. Wright, in a seriously funny performance), or that the would-be lovers live miles and miles away from each other. Nick conspires to right these wrongs, even if it means giving Sheeni a near-fatal dosage of sleeping pills.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Nick’s real problem is that he’s too shy and reserved to go all the way, and so he creates a devil-may-care alter ego for himself named Francois Dillinger. The best joke in the movie is that this super-masculine badass is also played by… uh, Michael Cera. Recovering nicely from the abysmal YEAR ONE, Cera delivers his most winning performance since SUPERBAD, giving distinct characteristics to both Nick and Francois. The movie gets funnier as it goes along because Francois says things that Nick can only think about, like “I want to tickle your bellybutton… from the inside!”&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The movie is clearly R-rated from the get-go, opening just as Nick is finishing spanking his monkey. Unlike the latter-day installments of the AMERICAN PIE series, it never strays into soft-core territory. The R-rating allows the filmmakers to take an honest approach to the material – so that when Sheeni asks Nick to rub suntan lotion on her back, what happens is not only funny but realistic. That’s not to say everything that happens in YOUTH IN REVOLT is 100 percent believable; the tone of the picture might be described as gently stylized. The scenes between Nick and Francois have their own crazy logic, while two animated sequences perfectly capture the way Nick feels about the adult world.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Sheeni is just intimidating enough for you to see why Nick has to become more assertive before he can have her. Portia Doubleday is new to me as an actress, but she’s a perfect match for Cera; you want to see these two end up together. The talented young leads are given strong support by some very gifted comedic actors, including Steve Buscemi, Fred Willard and Justin Long. YOUTH IN REVOLT is an American original that sets the bar pretty high for teen comedies in 2010.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;'
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;Directed by Peter Jackson, THE LOVELY BONES is one long bad trip of a movie – perhaps the most disastrous film adaptation of a major American novel since Brian De Palma brought Tom Wolfe’s THE BONFIRE OF THE VANITIES to the screen. Frankly, I’m surprised it didn’t work, because if anything this project seemed to represent the ideal marriage of a filmmaker and his source material.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Alice Sebold’s beloved 2002 novel told the story of Susie Salmon, who at the age of 14 is raped and murdered by a man from her neighborhood. She goes to a place she calls “my Heaven”, where she can see what happens in her absence down on Earth. Narrated by Susie, the novel struck a perfect balance between fantastical sequences and everyday life as it’s lived in the wake of unspeakable tragedy. Unfortunately, the movie does no such thing. Jackson gives the novel’s rich tapestry of complex characters and relationships short shrift, instead focusing on the cinematic possibilities of Susie’s afterlife.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;That might not come as a surprise to fans of THE LORD OF THE RINGS and 2005’s KING KONG, who see Jackson as basically a fantasy/special-effects director. But for those familiar with the Kiwi filmmaker’s earlier work, the nonstop CGI spectacle of THE LOVELY BONES will come as a major letdown.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Jackson once showed a flair for telling true crime stories with supernatural elements. In HEAVENLY CREATURES, the highly imaginative inner worlds of Pauline Parker and Juliet Hulme were brought vividly to life, and this helped explain the girls’ ultimate decision to commit matricide. In similar fashion, THE FRIGHTENERS worked equally well as a ghost story and a portrait of a serial killer. Unfocused and tone deaf, THE LOVELY BONES is more of a hodgepodge.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Still, it starts off great. The first 30 minutes are relatively faithful to the novel. We see Susie (Saoirse Ronan) falling for a boy named Ray (Reece Ritchie) and spending time at the mall with her grandmother (Susan Sarandon). During the scene where her killer, Mr. Harvey (Stanley Tucci, quite good at playing a sociopath), lures her to a cellar he’s built beneath a cornfield, I found myself wanting to yell a word of warning at the screen – usually a good sign that a film is working. Their final scene together, with Mr. Harvey soaking in a bloody, mud-caked bathtub, is the film’s sole claim to indelibility.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The problems arise when Jackson and his screenwriters, Fran Walsh and Philippa Boyens, stray from the novel – what they add and subtract. The afterlife scenes, though visually spectacular, are pretty atrocious. We don’t know very much about Susie, and so the things she sees in her Heaven are inexplicable to us. And, quite frankly, it’s just plain weird to see her having the time of her life when only 20 minutes of screen time have passed since her brutal murder.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;But the absolute worst is what the movie leaves out. Viewers who haven’t read the book will be utterly perplexed when Susie’s mom (Rachel Weisz) leaves her family and heads off to California wine country. And don’t even get me started on how little screen time is spent on the blossoming of Susie’s younger sister (Rose McIver), or the bond Ray forms with a bohemian girl named Ruth (Carolyn Dando), or Mr. Harvey’s troubled childhood, or…. Jackson has gotten so sloppy with the theatrical cuts of his films that maybe all of this material will be featured on an extended edition DVD. One can only hope.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;As is, THE LOVELY BONES is solidly shot and acted, especially by Ronan and Tucci. (Though Mark Wahlberg is terrible as Susie’s dad; did M. Night Shyamalan rob Wahlberg of his acting talent when they worked together on THE HAPPENING?) It’s also a square Christian morality tale – something I would have never expected from the man responsible for 1989’s MEET THE FEEBLES, in which lewd puppets sang a song called “Sodomy.” Twenty years and a few billion dollars later, Jackson has made a misguided attempt to draw comfort from a story that has precious little to offer.&lt;/p&gt;'
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;Symbol is Japanese comic legend Hitoshi Matsumoto’s second feature, the follow up to his lovably weird, boldly alienating and completely hilarious Dai Nipponjin (aka Big Man Japan, 2007). Two seemingly unrelated stories play in parallel in the film. In one, Mexican luchador Escargot Man must face the seemingly insurmountably strong and youthful Tequila Joe in a wrestiling match while his young son looks on. The other features Matsumoto as a nameless, pyjama-clad unfortunate who wakes up inside a large, seemingly endlessly tall white void of a room with walls studded with stylized cherubs’ penises that, when depressed, cause various household objects (chopsticks and sushi, space heaters, 3-d glasses) to be dispensed into the room. I’ll let you read that again.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Symbol is a near-masterpiece of weird, conceptual, existential humour and expertly handled, perfectly sustained and timed slapstick comedy of the oldest, best school. I can think of no comic actor other than Matsumoto who could pull something like this film off… you’d have to go back to Andy Kaufman or before him Chaplin to find someone who could theoretically create a long-form, slow-boil whopper of a joke the way Matsumoto has, one that never gets boring, the set-up for the ultimate punch-line disguised and hidden behind masterfully funny vaudevillian shtick. It’s one of the funniest film’s I’ve seen in the past couple of years, and it looks like a Tom Friedman art installation, and it’s smarter than I think I can really get a handle on. I loved it utterly. Completely bizarre, radically funny and oddly, wonderfully moving, and I won't say anything more. 9.5/10&lt;/p&gt;'
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short-body => 'Symbol is Japanese comic legend Hitoshi Matsumoto’s second feature, the follow up to his lovably weird, boldly alienating and completely hilarious Dai Nipponjin (aka Big Man Japan, 2007). Two seemingly unrelated stories play in parallel in the film. In one, Mexican luchador Escargot Man must face the seemingly insurmountably strong and youthful ...'
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;A Town Called Panic is the anarchic, frenetic feature film version of the popular Belgian cartoon of the same name. Technically crude but all the better for it, the film like the cartoon is stop-motion animated using what look like (and in some cases are) the cheap plastic toy figurines that came by the dozens in bags, complete with plastic bases affixed to their feet. It stars Indian and Cowboy, two best-friend troublemaking goofs sharing a room in a house with the older, more serious Horse. They live in a small village with an angry farmer, his patient wife, their legion of pigs, chickens and cows (who take music lessons from Madame Longrée, the red-maned object of Horse’s nervous affection) and a policeman in charge of keeping the peace.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;After a birthday celebration goes awry, Horse, Cowboy and Indian are left with a mystery that leads them on an adventure that takes them in 20 minutes from the centre of the earth to the north pole in a battle with bizarre terrorist scientists, to the bottom of the ocean and back. It’s riotously creative and thoroughly enjoyable, a kids movie that doesn’t pander or play down, with enough solid character-based humour to sustain itself with older audiences over the long haul. It suffers from being a little one-note, especially at an hour plus, that’s a small complaint. It doesn’t drag at all.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;It’s also a great example of how creativity, real creativity and a solid, technically sound script can eclipse the need for effects, giant lighting kits, lingering close-ups on beautiful emoting womens’ faces and all of the other expensive cinematic “fundamentals” that can stand in the way of a dude with an idea and a hundred bucks and a finished movie. A Town Called Panic is inspirationally small-scale – unless I’m desperately stupid, the total cost for everything that makes it on screen couldn’t be more than a couple thousand bucks – but manages to convey a convincing, charming sense of adventure using only wit and effort. It’s d.i.y. to the core, and it’s inspirational. 7/10&lt;/p&gt;'
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short-body => 'A Town Called Panic is the anarchic, frenetic feature film version of the popular Belgian cartoon of the same name. Technically crude but all the better for it, the film like the cartoon is stop-motion animated using what look like (and in some cases are) the cheap plastic toy figurines that came by the dozens in bags, complete with plastic bases ...'
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;Michael J. Bassett’s adaptation of Robert E. Howard’s Solomon Kane is the exact kind of film that I’d have somehow managed to see when I was 12 or 13 and fallen completely in love with. Thanks in part I guess to the fact that I haven’t grown up that much, I still love it. A pure, unsophisticated (in the best, most honest way) adventure film not designed to appeal to multiple demographics, it doesn’t get goofy to skew young, or have much in the way of romance. It’s just a damned, pissed off dude with swords, hacking and slashing his way through the demonic hordes of evil men stopping him from finding the evil sorcerer that holds the key to saving his immortal soul.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Like the adaptations of Robert E. Howard’s other, more famous creation Conan the Barbarian, Solomon Kane is unremittingly dark: it’s scary, dirty and violent through and through. At the same time, however, it’s got a really charming innocence, a freedom from gimmick or the need to cast splashy stars. I’d watch Solomon Kane or something like it every other week, and gladly give up all the $200M dollar blockbusters, good and bad, to secure a steady supply of well crafted pulpy adventure films, pirate films, jungle explorer films, swordfight films, genres that are largely ignored, to our detriment. The film’s complete absence of irony, its lack of a need to “put a fresh spin” on an old genre is refreshing and a pure pleasure. The genre doesn't need a &amp;quot;fresh spin&amp;quot;. Solomon Kane is proof it just needs filmmakers that like the material and a cast that can act. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;James Purefoy is pitch-perfect as the troubled, murderous puritan, and the rest of the cast, including vets Pete Posthlewaite and Max von Sydow. The effects are used sparingly but to spectacular effect, and the filmmakers’ reliance on physical props in incredibly detailed sets is another nostalgic pleasure. The morning after the screening, I went and picked up some Robert E. Howard books, which I hope will help me prolong the pleasure I got from Michael J. Bassett’s film. As a new, medium-budget hack-and-slash film with no stars, it’s a shame that it is for the moment, a unique pleasure. 8.5/10&lt;/p&gt;'
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short-body => 'Michael J. Bassett’s adaptation of Robert E. Howard’s Solomon Kane is the exact kind of film that I’d have somehow managed to see when I was 12 or 13 and fallen completely in love with. Thanks in part I guess to the fact that I haven’t grown up that much, I still love it. A pure, unsophisticated (in the best, most honest way) adventure film not ...'
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;Jaume Balagueró and Paco Plaza’s follow up to their 2007 sensation [REC] (remade in America as Quarantine) [REC]2 picks up the story just 15 minutes after the events of the first film. An apartment building has been sealed off (ostensibly by the Department of Health) to contain a viral outbreak inside. One that seems to be turning the occupants into psychotic demons.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The first film made innovative use of first-person faux-documentary camerawork, following a tv presenter into the building as she investigates, and the sequel continues this style to great effect. We ride along looking through the helmet cameras of a four-man SWAT team tasked with escorting a senior “health” official into the building to investigate the outbreak. The outbreak of terrifying, duct-crawling hairless screeching child zombies.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;It’s scary and very clever, effective and frightening for reasons that go beyond the filmmakers very real skill with the camera and the timing of scares, screams and busted-down doors. A lot of its effectiveness is down to the very real atmosphere of dread that they are able to create both with solid, smart set design and to their choice to inject a little bit of magic, a little supernatural spookiness, a little eldritch-ness back into the zombie genre. Weirdly, speaking in broad terms, modern horror filmmakers have tried to somehow legitimize or make explicable both the zombie and the vampire as sufferers of some kind of virus or infection that could theoretically be cured. While ok this lets them use the monsters as interesting metaphors for a whole bunch of neat stuff, it also steals from them their other-worldliness, their spookiness, their ability to act as representatives of a world incomprehensibly beyond our own. They’re not supernatural, unknowable, they’ve just got rabies. Or the “rage virus”.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;[REC]2 returns, thankfully a little bit of that spooky incomprehensibility, and as a result it’s not just scary, it’s frightening. It lets us be frightened not just by attack and death, but of the unknown, the void from which its villain reaches out to us. That small change is enough to elevate the film up past the sum of its few flaws – its shallow or non-existent characterization of its SWAT protagonists, its grating, too-highly-pitched running shouting match first act – to become, like Sean Byrne’s The Loved Ones that we saw earlier this week, something that is both charming and bloody, heart-warmingly cinematic and really, really scary and gross. 7.8/10&lt;/p&gt;'
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review-count => 25
user-dir => 'user_files/'
short-body => 'Jaume Balagueró and Paco Plaza’s follow up to their 2007 sensation [REC] (remade in America as Quarantine) [REC]2 picks up the story just 15 minutes after the events of the first film. An apartment building has been sealed off (ostensibly by the Department of Health) to contain a viral outbreak inside. One that seems to be turning the occupants into...'
teaser => 'Take The Lady in the Lake and add demon zombies.'
title => '[REC]2'
type-id => 5
6 =>
__attr__id => 813
__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;Ever since some young dude drank a gourd-full of hallucinogenic wasp paste and stumbled out into the barren tundra to become a man, he alone against the cruelty of nature, people have been subjecting themselves to uncomfortable extremes in the name of self discovery. People free climb sheer rock faces. People run hundred mile races through the desert where they’re pretty much guaranteed to poo themselves and not even have enough sauce in their body to cry about it.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I go to Midnight Madness.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;10 movies, 10 nights getting punted out of a downtown theatre at 2:30 in the morning to wander through the concrete heck that is Yonge and Dundas square. It teaches me about myself. Time dilates and contracts. Sometimes I feel really tired. They won't let me bring in food so I get kind of hungry. I find myself cheering Kevin Sorbo. I don’t like Kevin Sorbo. Why am I cheering. What is happening. The room smells cheese poured on microwaved nerd.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Rajo, my movie-going partner, flipped over the promo card for Bitch Slap as we sat in line, looked at the gun, the boobs, and said “I’m excited… this could be good.”&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;“No, it couldn’t”, I said.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I learned something about myself. I’m a genre movie pessimist. I believed then that it’s not impossible to theoretically make a well-made, enjoyable Russ-Meyer-and-Foxy-Brown-inspired chicksploitation movie with big boobs and tough babes in 2009, it’s just impossible that it had actually happened. Possible to do, impossible for someone to have done it, now. The circumstances that the original movies were made under were too weird, the people were too fetishistically dedicated to their odd craft. These people, these Kevin Sorbo people, they couldn't have done it.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I was right. They hadn’t. Bitch Slap isn’t very good, at all. It’s a movie about killer babes that have shootouts and water fights and chaste lesbian make-out scenes in the desert. The story is a muddled pastiche of action movie tropes and half the film is purposefully bad green-screen stuff in front of gaudy backdrops, and the other half or more happens in the same 10 feet of sand in front of a trailer. Two of the villains have amped up their performances so much, going so far over the top (the baseline established by the rest of the film already fever-pitch heaving-bosom sky-high) that it becomes literally and without exaggeration impossible to understand what they’re saying. The actors are emoting so hard, at such a pitch that all that grinds out of their mouths is a strangled series of grunts and whistles. It’s awful, its unpleasant, it’s gaudy and worse, it’s boring.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I may be a pessimist, but I’m right I guess. The boob glass is half empty and the space in the glass that’s not boob juice or whatever isn’t even air, it’s terrible poison air that will make you feel sad about yourself if you try to drink in the small meager amount of boob juice in the glass. 3/10.&lt;/p&gt;'
alias => 'bitch_slap'
dt-publish => '8 years ago'
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name => 'Action & Adventure'
logo => 'logo.jpg'
movie =>
__attr__id => 624
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title => 'Bitch Slap'
rating => 40
reviewer =>
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login => 'thesubstream'
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short-body => 'Ever since some young dude drank a gourd-full of hallucinogenic wasp paste and stumbled out into the barren tundra to become a man, he alone against the cruelty of nature, people have been subjecting themselves to uncomfortable extremes in the name of self discovery. People free climb sheer rock faces. People run hundred mile races through the ...'
teaser => 'Girls have boobs, on their chest. That's where they are.'
title => 'Bitch Slap'
type-id => 5
7 =>
__attr__id => 811
__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;Sean Byrne's The Loved Ones is a charmer for horror fans, a charmingly revolting mash up of Hostel and The People Under the Stairs, with none of the former's glitzy nihilism and enough of the latter's goofy implausibility to create a harrowing, hilarious amalgam that'll entertain the hell out of you without making you feel bad about yourself as a person and your choice of entertainment.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Brent (Xavier Samuel) is a troubled high school student dealing with the loss of his father and his grieving mother. The afternoon prior to his highschool prom, he encounters some trouble and I know that is a terrible description, but so few horror films maintain the ability to surprise that I'm going to be extra careful to not ruin any of The Loved One's impressive ability to shock. Suffice it to say that it's an astoundingly deftly handled combination of light-hearted macabre humour and grisly, chilling violence. It does what I'd thought impossible, really, in that it leavens the morbid, transgressive gore of films like À l'intérieur and the aforementioned Hostel with solid, character-based humour and somehow, a spirit of good-heartedness. It's incredibly, astoundingly well-acted with a top-notch score, and pretty good set design. It's also a masterclass in horror film editing: as a low-budget film, much of the emotional/psychological weight of the film has to be constructed with shot selection, pacing and cuts rather than effects or fancy impossible camerawork or incredibly expensive sets, and the cutting on The Loved Ones is top notch all the way, an absolute pleasure. To pick nits, it has a clunker of a sub-plot that does little more than function as comedic relief and release valve for the considerable tension that the main storyline builds, and its irrelevancy is distracting.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;It's by far the maddest, best Midnight Madness film so far this year, and it's a shame it showed on Sunday to a 3/4-full house while the marginal Jennifer's Body and its crew of stars breezed in, opened the thing, and took off. The Loved Ones is a film that deserves to be seen, a genre freakout worthy of as much attention as it can get, which I hope is a lot. Truly enjoyble, truly independent, truly scary. 8.5/10.&lt;/p&gt;'
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dt-publish => '8 years ago'
genre =>
__attr__id => 7
name => 'Horror'
logo => 'logo.jpg'
movie =>
__attr__id => 622
cover => 'cover.jpg'
title => 'The Loved Ones'
rating => 80
reviewer =>
__attr__id => 1619
avatar => 'thesubstream_1258390890.jpg'
login => 'thesubstream'
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short-body => 'Sean Byrne's The Loved Ones is a charmer for horror fans, a charmingly revolting mash up of Hostel and The People Under the Stairs, with none of the former's glitzy nihilism and enough of the latter's goofy implausibility to create a harrowing, hilarious amalgam that'll entertain the hell out of you without making you feel bad about yourself as a ...'
teaser => 'I loved it, everybody else loved it, you'll love it.'
title => 'The Loved Ones'
type-id => 5
8 =>
__attr__id => 807
__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;Building on the genre-clash crossover theme that was solidly established the first night of TIFF's Midnight Madness with the slasher flick cum teen girl comedy Jennifer's Body, programmer Colin Geddes has delivered another interesting hybrid: the futuristic, sci-fi-vampire film Daybreakers.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Set 10 years into the future and after the bat-spawned vampire plague converted the vast majority of humans into blood-sucking chain-smoking nocturnal regular joes who have to shave by watching themselves in a video feed, Daybreakers is directed by the twin Spierig brothers. They're MM vets, these dudes, as their last film (2003's Undead) famously closed out the beloved Uptown theatre here in Toronto, the still-mourned theatre that was home to the midnight TIFF screenings before they moved to the cavernous, impersonal and enormous Ryerson hall.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Ethan Hawke plays vampire Edward, the reticent, kind-hearted Chief Hematologist of the giant multi-national corporation tasked with farming the remaining few humans for their blood and developing a substitute to feed the billions of vampires teetering on the edge of starvation as resources dwindle. The film is a neat enough allegory any number of take-your-pick conservation issues, food, water, oil; one of the things that makes the film work is that it's sci-fi of the best kind, true speculative fiction that talks about what's happening now, or could happen soon, through a lens that both abstracts it slightly and makes it easier (if at times much too much and too obvious) to see. The Spierig bros' film is entertaining from the start, it takes an immediate heart-warming leap into territory any genre film-lover will like. The film says &amp;quot;ok, this is a vampire movie, it's in the future, the humans lost, the vampires have their own society now&amp;quot; and instead of just telling that story, the story of the battle, Daybreakers takes that as pat and asks &amp;quot;ok, now that you've accepted that in the prologue, what happens to vampire society when it runs out of blood?&amp;quot;.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;It's joyous just in its premise, so reminiscent and redolent of true movie-monster-nerd basement fantasy conversations about who would win between Dracula and Predator or what would happen if the Nazis had werewolf soldiers that any number of technical shortcomings, like a jumbled, poorly paced and overlong second act or a handful of not-very-good performances can be overlooked easily and gladly. While much of the film feels (and not just due to the presence of Ethan Hawke, who oddly spends the last half an hour of the film looking exactly like Han Solo) like vampire Gattaca as the machinations of the rebel-underground-vs-evil-corporate-overlords-and-there's-also-a-family-betrayal-subplot revolve, there are a handful of truly scary, truly sublime scenes of the best kind of vampire carnage, gory and stylish and terrifying. For lovers like me of genre freakouts, Daybreakers offers a flawed but thoroughly enjoyable, happy-making trip, one foot firmly in vampire flick tradition and the other in entertaining, creative and original speculative territory. I was sold the moment I didn't see Ethan Hawke's reflection in the rear view mirror of a sleek, futured-up Chevy cruising through the best Blade Runner future two Australian indie filmmaker brothers could create. 8.1/10.&lt;/p&gt;'
alias => 'daybreakers'
dt-publish => '8 years ago'
genre =>
__attr__id => 11
name => 'Sci-Fi & Fantasy'
logo => 'logo.jpg'
movie =>
__attr__id => 620
cover => 'cover.jpg'
title => 'Daybreakers'
rating => 80
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avatar => 'thesubstream_1258390890.jpg'
login => 'thesubstream'
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short-body => 'Building on the genre-clash crossover theme that was solidly established the first night of TIFF's Midnight Madness with the slasher flick cum teen girl comedy Jennifer's Body, programmer Colin Geddes has delivered another interesting hybrid: the futuristic, sci-fi-vampire film Daybreakers. Set 10 years into the future and after the bat-spawned ...'
teaser => 'Now we're talking Midnight Madness. This is the stuff here man.'
title => 'Daybreakers'
type-id => 5
9 =>
__attr__id => 806
__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;Zombie movie legend George A. Romero and his recent films occupy an odd niche, to say the least. Having basically invented the zombie genre while at the same time arguably perfecting it with his first film, 1968's Night of the Living Dead, Romero made two sequels that each tried to expand on the social commentary-amidst-the-carnage he pioneered in the first. The first sequel, 1978's Dawn of the Dead is great while the second, Day of the Dead (1985), which introduced us to Romero's idea of zombie as degenerate, trainable creature rather than animated magical eating machine, is not. Then he stopped making zombie movies for 20 years.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;In that time, a new generation of filmmakers and comic book authors expanded on his zombie vision, and a new generation of fans came to revere Romero as a master and pioneer. He's probably one of those things. None of his three late-period films, Land of the Dead (2005), Diary of the Dead (2008) and this year's Survival of the Dead are very good: they're technically unsophisticated, not particularly scary and painfully heavy-handed with alternately simplistic and totally baffling social commentary. But there are thousands and thousands of fans that love them, that enjoy the shit out of them, that will dress up like zombies and march to Yonge and Dundas square to see him accept some award from a local politician. They cheer every spurt of too-red cgi blood, they laugh at every clunker of a joke and every cheesy throw-away tough-guy one-liner. This is not a bunch of young people latching on to the bad-taste work of a director like John Waters. whose films &amp;quot;offended mainstream sensibilities&amp;quot;. The bad taste in Romeros recent films is not provocative, not transgressive, not transvestites eating dog shit. The bad taste from Romero's latest film, for example comes from its basic flaws, its technical and tonal gaps and dips, its weird pacing, its uneven acting and incomprehensible plot. Stuff happens for no reason. Burly actors pitch hammy temper tantrums after other characters die for no explicable reason. Motivations are muddled or missing entirely. Zombies ride through scenes on horseback, apropos of nothing, and nobody notices save a toqued fisherman who remarks flatly &amp;quot;That was my daughter&amp;quot;. Even the premise is enough to make you wonder if you're just not getting the joke: Survival of the Dead, tells the story of two feuding Irish patriarchs, one a roguish sea captain, the other a old-west land baron replete with wichester rifle and black cowboy hat. It's set on an island off the coast of Delaware. Seriously. It's easy to miss the joke. To get it, you just have to not care.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The crowd loved it. He's in a hell of a weird spot, Romero. He's a star, a living cinematic legend to an army of devoted fans who can appreciate the hell out of his films, and do, and will. It's not about how good they are, with Romero and Survival of the Dead and the rest of films and his fans, because the film's aren't very good. It's about something else. It's not about advancing the art of genre filmmaking, it's about paying homage its past. Romero's not going to have a moment with his fans like Kubrick did with his after Eyes Wide Shut where millions of eager devotees collectively shrugged their shoulders and got wistful for older better films. As long as Romero keeps making films with lurching starving ghouls, he will always have an audience because seeing his films for these young kids (and I was one of them, lionizing him after watching Dawn of the Dead as a kid and feeling like I had unearthed a secret, hidden treasure) isn't about being moved or scared or entertaned or informed by the actual story or it's actors, it's about communing with an anarchic cinematic spirit, and with each other, part of a zombie horde, out walking at midnight to the theatre, strange and powerful and leaking fluids onto the pavement. It's about being a zombie, which, hell... they had a hell of a lot more fun watching the movie than I did, which is probably my problem, not theirs. 5/10&lt;/p&gt;'
alias => 'survival_of_the_dead'
dt-publish => '8 years ago'
genre =>
__attr__id => 7
name => 'Horror'
logo => 'logo.jpg'
movie =>
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cover => 'cover.jpg'
title => 'Survival of the Dead'
rating => 60
reviewer =>
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avatar => 'thesubstream_1258390890.jpg'
login => 'thesubstream'
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user-dir => 'user_files/'
short-body => 'Zombie movie legend George A. Romero and his recent films occupy an odd niche, to say the least. Having basically invented the zombie genre while at the same time arguably perfecting it with his first film, 1968's Night of the Living Dead, Romero made two sequels that each tried to expand on the social commentary-amidst-the-carnage he pioneered in ...'
teaser => 'Romero keeps surviving, and probably always will.'
title => 'Survival of the Dead'
type-id => 5
rss-link => 'reviews/theaters/'
search-string => ''
rss => 'http://www.filmnet.com/rss/reviews/theaters/'
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userFiles => 'http://i.filmnet.com/user_files/'
videoFiles => 'http://i.filmnet.com/video_files/'

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  40. [0.19 ms] SELECT `users`.* FROM `users` WHERE (user_id='1619')
  41. [0.1 ms] SELECT `rg`.* FROM `review_genres` AS `rg` WHERE (genre_id = '7')
  42. [2.12 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `r`.*, `vr`.`video_id`, `cr`.`channel_id`, `ur`.`user_id`, `mr`.`movie_id` FROM `reviews` AS `r` LEFT JOIN `video__reviews` AS `vr` ON vr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `channel__reviews` AS `cr` ON cr.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `user__reviews` AS `ur` ON ur.review_id = r.review_id LEFT JOIN `movie__reviews` AS `mr` ON mr.review_id = r.review_id WHERE (1 AND r.`reviewer_id` = 1619 AND r.is_published_review = 1 AND r.is_deleted_review = 0) ORDER BY `r`.`dt_published_review` DESC
  43. [0.54 ms] SELECT `m`.* FROM `movies` AS `m` WHERE (movie_id = '619')
  44. [0.49 ms] SELECT DISTINCT `rg`.* FROM `review_genres` AS `rg` LEFT JOIN `reviews` AS `r` ON rg.`genre_id` = r.`genre_id` WHERE (1 AND r.`review_type_id` = 5 AND r.`is_published_review` = 1 AND r.`is_deleted_review` = 0) ORDER BY `rg`.`genre_name` ASC

File Information

146 Files Included
Total Size: 1495.1K
Basepath: /mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/settings/../../../

Application Files

/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/Bootstrap.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/channels/models/Channels.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/default/models/Assistant.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/default/models/Filters.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/reviews/controllers/ReviewsController.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/reviews/models/Movies.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/reviews/models/ReviewGenres.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/reviews/models/Reviews.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/users/models/Users.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/modules/videos/models/Videos.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/settings/config.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/system/acl.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/application/frontend/system/routes.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/Controller/Plugin/Acl.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/Controller/Plugin/AjaxCheck.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/Controller/Plugin/AutoLogin.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/Controller/Plugin/FlashMessenger.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/Controller/Plugin/InmailMessageCount.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/Paginator/Adapter/DbSelect.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/View/Serializer.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/App/View/Xslt.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/www/index.php

Zend Library Files

/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Assert/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Exception.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Resource.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Resource/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Role.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Role/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Role/Registry.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Acl/Role/Registry/Exception.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Auth.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Auth/Storage/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Auth/Storage/Session.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Cache.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Cache/Backend.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Cache/Backend/ExtendedInterface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Cache/Backend/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Cache/Backend/Memcached.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Cache/Core.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Config.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action/Helper/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action/Helper/FlashMessenger.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action/Helper/ViewRenderer.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action/HelperBroker.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action/HelperBroker/PriorityStack.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Action/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Dispatcher/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Dispatcher/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Dispatcher/Standard.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Exception.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Front.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Plugin/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Plugin/Broker.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Plugin/ErrorHandler.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Request/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Request/Http.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Response/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Response/Http.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Rewrite.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Route.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Route/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Route/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Route/Module.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Route/Regex.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Adapter/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Adapter/Pdo/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Adapter/Pdo/Mysql.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Expr.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Profiler.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Profiler/Query.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Select.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Statement.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Statement/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Statement/Pdo.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Table/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Exception.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Inflector.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/PregReplace.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/StringToLower.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Word/CamelCaseToDash.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Word/CamelCaseToSeparator.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Word/Separator/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Word/SeparatorToSeparator.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Word/UnderscoreToSeparator.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Form.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Json.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Json/Expr.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Loader.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Loader/Autoloader.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Loader/PluginLoader.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Loader/PluginLoader/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Locale.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Locale/Data/Translation.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Filter/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Filter/Priority.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Formatter/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Formatter/Simple.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Writer/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Writer/Stream.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Paginator.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Paginator/Adapter/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Paginator/ScrollingStyle/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Paginator/ScrollingStyle/Jumping.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Registry.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Session.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Session/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Session/Exception.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Session/Namespace.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Session/SaveHandler/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Translate.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Translate/Adapter.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Translate/Adapter/Gettext.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Uri.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Validate/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Version.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/HeadMeta.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/HeadTitle.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Placeholder/Container.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Placeholder/Container/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Placeholder/Container/Standalone.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Placeholder/Registry.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Interface.php

ZFDebug Library Files

/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Database.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Exception.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/File.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Html.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Memory.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Registry.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Text.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Time.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Variables.php

Memory Usage

Controller: 5376.27K

Custom Timers

Controller: 823.01 ms

Overall Timers

reviews
reviews
list
Avg: 2077.75 ms / 1 requests
Min: 2077.75 ms
Max: 2077.75 ms

Reset timers by sending ZFDEBUG_RESET as a GET/POST parameter

Registered Instances

Zend_View_Helper_Placeholder_Registry => Zend_View_Helper_Placeholder_Registry Object()
acl => Zend_Acl Object()
baseDir => 'http://www.filmnet.com/'
cache => Zend_Cache_Core Object()
config => Zend_Config Object()
db => Zend_Db_Adapter_Pdo_Mysql Object()
translator => Zend_Translate Object()
copyright 1.8.0/5.2.10-2ubuntu6variables Variableshtml HTMLdatabase 44 in 274.3 msfile 146 Filesmemory 15369K of 1024Mtime 2077.75 msregistry Registry (7)«