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Frida

Genre: Drama

Julie Taymor's FRIDA is a solidly entertaining biopic that's as easy to admire as a Grant Wood painting.

Julie Taymor's FRIDA is a solidly entertaining biopic that's as easy to admire as a Grant Wood painting, which is surprising since the movie tells the story of controversial Mexican painter Frida Kahlo. At its worst it's like a paint-by-numbers picture, but at its best...

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Review by: SteveRhodes

Added: 8 years ago

In 1982 Wolfgang Petersen was nominated for an Academy Award for his depiction of life aboard a submarine.

You and several dozen of your co-workers have been confined to a narrow metal casket that lies 150 meters below the ocean's surface. Your competition is exploding bombs all around you with the firm expectation that you will soon be blown to Kingdom come. Welcome to a hard day at work aboard a German U-boat in World War II. In 1982 Wolfgang Petersen was nominated for an Academy Award for his depiction of life aboard a submarine. Called DAS BOOT, it was, at the time, the most popular foreign language film ever released in the United States. Even today, it remains a popular video rental in this country. For the fifteenth anniversary, there...

Read more

Review by: SteveRhodes

Added: 8 years ago

I've seen this year, but most people will probably never see it, figuring that the movie is another forgettable teen comedy.

Sometimes acceptance isn't a good idea. Congressman Tom Oakley (Bruce Davison) has learned to "accept" (read "give up on") his messed-up, 17-year-old daughter Nicole, even though he admits that she's destructive, volatile and angry. As the almost always wasted Nicole, Kirsten Dunst turns in a gut-wrenchingly honest performance that reduced me to tears. If CRAZY/BEAUTIFUL had been made by some big name director, rather than the perceptive but relatively unknown John Stockwell ("Cheaters"), Dunst might garner serious Oscar consideration for her part. It is one of the best pieces of acting that I've seen this year, but most people will ...

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Review by: SteveRhodes

Added: 8 years ago

Crash

Genre: Drama

CRASH, is directed and co-written by Paul Haggis, the Oscar nominated writer of MILLION DOLLAR BABY.

CRASH, a movie set ironically during the Christmas season, would have much more aptly been called RACE, as its large and talented cast chews up the scenery, packing every sentence with some racial insult. A funny and sometimes downright hilarious movie, RACE, I mean CRASH, is directed and co-written by Paul Haggis, the Oscar nominated writer of MILLION DOLLAR BABY. Populated with characters who are all stereotypes, the complicated story feels more like a fascinating writing exercise than it does a movie, in which you normally expect characters that are more genuine and coincidences that aren't around every single corner. But that is more...

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Review by: SteveRhodes

Added: 8 years ago

One of the greatest technological accomplishments in the history of the movies.

As a kid I remember watching a lot of cartoons. Growing up in the 1980's, I distinctly remember watching my favorite programs (The Real Ghostbusters, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and Thundercats) and not thinking about the animation. The worlds that these characters occupied were real, not imaginary. They existed vividly in my imagination. I typically watched my favorite shows on Saturday mornings. After school everyday Nickelodeon played a show called "Looney Toons" which was basically that- classic Warner Bros cartoons from the 1940's, 50's and 60's. I remember Daffy Duck being my favorite of the lot. Something about Daffy was just a ...

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Review by: shaunhenisey

Added: 8 years ago

Lynch’s masterpiece.

David Lynch’s Mulholland Dr is one great mind game. Here is a movie that challenges the viewer to not sit passively and watch the events unfold on the screen but to be actively engaged. It is a film in which you never can quite remember what comes next. As soon as it is over you want to rewind it and watch it again, because you obviously missed something. The film truly defies genre. It is a mystery, a thriller, romance and noir, all while also being a concept film. You think you have it figured out and then all of sudden you remember a certain scene and double back on yourself. It is a movie that forces the viewer to think- what a ...

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Review by: shaunhenisey

Added: 8 years ago

No matter how many jokes about big booties BEAUTY SHOP tosses at us, it's nothing more than BARBER SHOP LITE.

No matter how many jokes about big booties BEAUTY SHOP tosses at us, it's nothing more than BARBER SHOP LITE. As the story starts, Gina Norris (Queen Latifah) is the best stylist in a very upscale cuttery run by the flamboyant Jorge Christophe. With long curly hair and a really cheesy accent, Kevin Bacon chews up the scenery as Jorge, who -- surprise -- might not really be Austrian after all. Treating his employees like slaves, he faces a revolt when Gina dumps him to form her own salon. Although she struggles to find a loan and to keep her dilapidated place in running order, Gina never wants for customers. Profits, however, seem to ...

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Review by: SteveRhodes

Added: 8 years ago

I had to restrain my fingers while writing this review.

Painfully unfunny, I HEART HUCKABEES is a ridiculous mess of a movie by David O. Russell. After his nearly universally acclaimed success with THREE KINGS, this pathetic picture will come as a real disappointment to his fans. The story concerns one Albert Markovski (Jason Schwartzman), an environmentalist who is troubled by some recent coincidences in his life involving a Sudanese emigrant whom Albert has recently seen three times in different places. To answer the larger picture of what this means, Albert employees Bernard and Vivian, a pair of wacky existential detectives played hamily by Dustin Hoffman and Lily Tomlin, to probe the ...

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Review by: SteveRhodes

Added: 8 years ago

Murder, masturbation, pedophilia, suicide and numerous forms of vicious human behavior, it has them all in abundance.

For those of you who thought Neil LaBute's latest cinematic diatribe, YOUR FRIENDS & NEIGHBORS, was too upbeat, HAPPINESS is just the film for you. Writer and director Todd Solondz, who burst onto the motion picture landscape a couple of years ago with the widely acclaimed WELCOME TO THE DOLLHOUSE, is back with his second film, HAPPINESS, which is about people who are anything but. (For the record, I had Solondz's first picture at the absolute top of my best of the year list in 1996. It was the best example in years of what an indie film could be. It had unknown actors in a low budget production that had more insights and depth than ...

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Review by: SteveRhodes

Added: 8 years ago

I'll never forget the three lead performances, and I certainly hope I never meet anyone like their characters.

Paul McGuigan's GANGSTER NO. 1 is an extremely violent British gangster movie that recalls older classics like THE LONG GOOD FRIDAY. The best part of the picture is the acting, although the warm, intimate cinematography, full of chilling close-ups, is superb, the editing, full of unusual transitions, is inviting and the rich, ironic music perfectly sets the mood. Delivering frightening, memorable performances are Malcolm McDowell (A CLOCKWORK ORANGE) as the old Gangster No. 1, who also narrates, Paul Bettany (the imaginary roommate in A BEAUTIFUL MIND) as Gangster No. 1 in his prime and David Thewlis (Besieged) as Freddie Mays, the "Butcher...

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Review by: SteveRhodes

Added: 8 years ago

Errol Morris is one of our most accomplished documentarians.

Errol Morris is one of our most accomplished documentarians. His A BRIEF HISTORY OF TIME explores the meaning of life and infinity through the mind of the brilliant physicist Stephen Hawking. His THE THIN BLUE LINE investigates a possibly innocent man sentenced to death for murder. And finally, what some consider his best, GATES OF HEAVEN examines people's feelings about a couple of California pet cemeteries. FAST, CHEAP, AND OUT OF CONTROL takes everything we know about the construction of a documentary and twists it around in fascinating ways. Rather than choose one subject, he picks four seemingly unrelated topics and then interlaces...

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Review by: SteveRhodes

Added: 8 years ago

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Frida

1 year ago

By: limolink

one of the best. you are provide many more information

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jonkajtys

6 years ago

By: TheLodgeShop

Great Review. Rally Great Article. Enjoyed the Read

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The Road

7 years ago

By: ThePeoplesMovies

the road . When it comes to movies that start as novel then movie Ive got a tendancy to see the ...

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By: cannesmann

Odd in presentation and pace. While some elements of the film are done in an avant garde manner, the...

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The Box

8 years ago

By: FriendlyMisanthrope

but I must say... ...The Happening? harsh! I couldn't get through 30 minutes of that movie online ...

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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt; You and several dozen of your co-workers have been confined to a narrow metal casket that lies 150 meters below the ocean's surface. Your competition is exploding bombs all around you with the firm expectation that you will soon be blown to Kingdom come. Welcome to a hard day at work aboard a German U-boat in World War II.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;In 1982 Wolfgang Petersen was nominated for an Academy Award for his depiction of life aboard a submarine. Called DAS BOOT, it was, at the time, the most popular foreign language film ever released in the United States. Even today, it remains a popular video rental in this country. For the fifteenth anniversary, there is a new director's cut and a new theatrical release.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The press kit likens its restoration work to that for the hugely popular STAR WARS SPECIAL EDITION series. The work on DAS BOOT, however, has several significant differences. Rather than add visuals to existing scenes as Lucas did, Petersen includes much more already existing footage. The original release of DAS BOOT ran 2:29. The director's cut adds a full hour, and the rumor is that the director originally wanted to add two hours.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;What is similar to the STAR WARS restoration is the treatment of the sound. Petersen and company completely redesigned and re-recorded new sound effects. The result is impressive. The original sound received one of the film's five Oscar nominations so the foundation for the digital remastering is substantial. There is no question that the changed sound improves the picture. Toward the end of the review, I'll compare the original with the remake in terms of the material added.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;In many films the director does not play a dominant role; LIAR LIAR was one recent example. In others, such as last year's SECRETS &amp;amp; LIES, the director takes total control and molds the film into his vision. DAS BOOT has a strong director's stamp on it, making it a prime candidate for a director's cut.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Most German directors continue making their films in German after they become internationally successful, but not Wolfgang Petersen. He went on to Hollywood where he came up with several thrillers -- the best being IN THE LINE OF FIRE with Clint Eastwood, John Malkovich, and Rene Russo. I've seen the trailers for Petersen's upcoming summer release of AIR FORCE ONE with Harrison Ford, Glenn Close, Gary Oldman, and the star of DAS BOOT, Jurgen Prochnow. The trailers look quite promising.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;DAS BOOT starts in the autumn of 1941 when the British convoys, with their stronger escorts, had turned the tide against the German U-boats. Hitler's answer was to build U-boats faster and staff them with young crews. Prochnow gives a brilliant performance as the stoic Captain who takes a cynical view of the war and his role in it. &amp;quot;I feel ancient around these kids,&amp;quot; he confesses. &amp;quot;Like I'm on a Children's Crusade.&amp;quot;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Herbert Gronemeyer plays a war correspondent named Werner. The Captain wants Werner to take the pictures of the crew on the way home instead of on the way out since they will have beards then to cover their babyish faces. The Captain does not hide his embarrassment that the war has come to this robbing of the cradle.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Even with a large cast, the director manages to make the characters distinguishable and engaging. Hubertus Bengsch plays the new spit-and-polish 1st Lieutenant, whom the rest of the officers belittle. Martin Semmelrogge is a baby-faced 2nd Lieutenant, who looks and acts like one of the kids from a Gen X comedy. Bernd Tauber plays the ever-resourceful Chief Quartermaster. Erwin Leder is the hard-driving but arguably crazy diesel engine operator named Johann.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The director received an Academy Award nomination for his script, which he based on a novel by Lothar-Guenther Buchheim. The story is based on actual incidents from World War II. The simple but chillingly realistic script succeeds not through its memorable lines, of which there are precious few, but because of the situations it creates. The ensemble cast does the rest. Remember, a submarine is like library. There is no talking allowed when it is open for business. Instead of dialog we have some of the most complex and emotive facial expressions in any film. Mental anguish causes men's sweat to pour and they look like they will crack under the pressure long before the ship's hull does.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Petersen says his vision for the film was, &amp;quot;to show the gritty and terrible reality of war AND to combine it with a highly entertaining story and fast-paced action style that would pull audiences into the experience of these young men.&amp;quot; He succeeds. No matter whose side you were on in WW II, these actors earn your empathy. Moreover, Petersen's engrossing storytelling abilities will have you on the edge of your seat for the entire picture. During the battle scenes I found my mouth kept hanging open as I wondered if this was going to be the depth charge that would blow them to smithereens.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;In 1982 DAS BOOT was the most expensive German film ever made up to that time. The result aimed for realism, not flash. The chief criticism of the picture stems from its main attribute: It is, arguably, the most claustrophobic film ever constructed. And yet, many small scenes, such as the one of the crew singing their favorite song, &amp;quot;It's a Long Way to Tipperary,&amp;quot; illustrates the crew's humanity. Although certainly a technical tour de force, the film occupies a much more important place in cinematic history. It shows up on many best films of all times lists, and other directors like Steven Spielberg cite its influence on their work.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;In one of the best anti-war films ever, there is no preaching against war. The film makes its powerful statement without needing to proclaim its message. There are no macho heroes in DAS BOOT, just a dedicated group of would-be survivors.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;When the movie was originally released I saw it first with subtitles and then in a dubbed version. Although the dubbing was well done, the subtitled version is much better. And, I am thankful to report, the director's cut is subtitled.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;One of the beauties of it having been fifteen years since I saw the movie is that I had forgotten most of the details and remembered only the impressions it made on me. I will not reveal the ending in the hopes that you either have forgotten it or have never seen it. I found the ending surprising, but perfect.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I promised to tell you which version I preferred -- the original or the director's cut. First, let me say that I cannot imagine your not wanting to see this director's cut if you have any serious interest in film. It is an expansive vision of a seminal picture that demands to be seen. I loved the director's cut and give it my highest rating. All of this notwithstanding, the original version with its tighter focus is the better of the two. The restoration, however, does have the improved soundtrack, and the original can no longer be seen in theaters. Although DAS BOOT is a picture that can work on a small screen, its impact can only be fully felt in a theater. See it before it moves to video. I suspect its theatrical run will be brief so act now or you may never again have the chance.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The director's cut of DAS BOOT runs about 3:30. It is rated R for war violence, rear male nudity and some profanity. It would be fine for teenagers. I give the film my strongest recommendation and top rating of ****.&lt;/p&gt;'
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;Sometimes acceptance isn't a good idea. Congressman Tom Oakley (Bruce Davison) has learned to &amp;quot;accept&amp;quot; (read &amp;quot;give up on&amp;quot;) his messed-up, 17-year-old daughter Nicole, even though he admits that she's destructive, volatile and angry. As the almost always wasted Nicole, Kirsten Dunst turns in a gut-wrenchingly honest performance that reduced me to tears. If CRAZY/BEAUTIFUL had been made by some big name director, rather than the perceptive but relatively unknown John Stockwell (&amp;quot;Cheaters&amp;quot;), Dunst might garner serious Oscar consideration for her part. It is one of the best pieces of acting that I've seen this year, but most people will probably never see it, figuring that the movie is another forgettable teen comedy.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;As the story opens, Nicole is busy cleaning the beach as part of her sentence for her DUI conviction. It is there that the wealthy, white Nicole meets Carlos (Jay Hernandez), a poor Hispanic who is Nicole's exact opposite. He's a poor kid who is working hard to get accepted into the Naval Academy so that he can be a pilot. Nicole and her girlfriend Maddy (Taryn Manning) see life as one long party. They think nothing of skipping class to drink themselves silly, coming on to strangers and generally shunning any kind of positive behavior. When Carlos, who is bused two hours to go to Nicole's rich school, says that he knows her, she rolls her eyes in a contemptuous flirt and tells him, &amp;quot;Doubt it!&amp;quot;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Needless to say, Nicole and Carlos become lovers, much to the consternation of his strict mom. Nicole's disapproving stepmother is only concerned about her toddler. Tom, who has spent his life trying to save the world, hasn't a clue as to how to rescue his own daughter. Davison stays away from the clichйs so you go from despising his character to empathizing with his plight.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Nicole, who wins your heart early-on, looks a mess. With sunken blue eyes, dirty, scraggly, blonde hair and disheveled clothes, she makes you want to give her a swift kick in the pants to straighten her out. But, she's as likeable as she is infuriating. In the story's key scene, she takes Carlos to bed as her father stands outside her glass-walled bedroom. Carlos is shocked, but Nicole claims that its okay since her father lets her do anything that she wants. Besides, she points out, her father would be proud that she's using a condom. Their safe sex is totally Carlos's idea. Dunst is frighteningly sexy. Although Carlos may be safe, you can easily see Nicole getting AIDS or some other disease from sex or needles. Reportedly, the director had to cut many scenes in order to bring it in at PG-13. Although Nicole carries a bottle around like a young girl clutching her teddy bear, she is never shown drinking from it or doing drugs. Nicole's splotchy face, however, shows the ravages of long, daily hours of destructive behavior.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Carlos's brother calls Nicole, &amp;quot;the trash girl,&amp;quot; since she was picking up garbage when they first saw her. It's an apt nickname for more reasons than one. With its realistic depiction of teen angst, CRAZY/BEAUTIFUL will break your heart without ever attempting to manipulate it. One hopes that after this part, more directors will offer meaty roles to Dunst, who looks like a young version of and clearly has the potential to be the next Meg Ryan.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;CRAZY/BEAUTIFUL runs 1:35. It is rated PG-13 for mature thematic material involving teens, drug/alcohol content, sexuality &amp;amp; language and would be acceptable for teenagers.&lt;/p&gt;'
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short-body => 'Sometimes acceptance isn't a good idea. Congressman Tom Oakley (Bruce Davison) has learned to "accept" (read "give up on") his messed-up, 17-year-old daughter Nicole, even though he admits that she's destructive, volatile and angry. As the almost always wasted Nicole, Kirsten Dunst turns in a gut-wrenchingly honest performance that reduced me to tears. If CRAZY/BEAUTIFUL had been made by some big name director, rather than the perceptive but relatively unknown John Stockwell ("Cheaters"), Dunst might garner serious Oscar consideration for her part. It is one of the best pieces of acting that I've seen this year, but most people will ...'
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;CRASH, a movie set ironically during the Christmas season, would have much more aptly been called RACE, as its large and talented cast chews up the scenery, packing every sentence with some racial insult. A funny and sometimes downright hilarious movie, RACE, I mean CRASH, is directed and co-written by Paul Haggis, the Oscar nominated writer of MILLION DOLLAR BABY.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Populated with characters who are all stereotypes, the complicated story feels more like a fascinating writing exercise than it does a movie, in which you normally expect characters that are more genuine and coincidences that aren't around every single corner. But that is more a commentary than a criticism. Once you accept that everyone in this film version of L.A. views every aspect of their lives through the color of their skin and everyone else's, it is easy to go with the flow and be entertained by the film's bold preposterousness. It is a movie that is really out there.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;There is a single exception. Late in the picture there is a child endangerment scene that is so far beyond the pale that I started literally to jump up and walk out in protest. After clearly crossing the line, the movie then tries to win us back into its good graces, but I initially had trouble forgiving it. I came close to docking the movie two full stars for that shameless incident but decided in the end to ignore it entirely in my rating, since the film's acting is so universally superb. Sandra Bullock, a wonderful actress who keeps signing up for bad movies, is never better than she is here as an uncontrollably angry housewife married to the District Attorney (Brendan Fraser).&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;CRASH runs 1:40. It is rated R for &amp;quot;language, sexual content and some violence&amp;quot; and would be acceptable for teenagers.&lt;/p&gt;'
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short-body => 'CRASH, a movie set ironically during the Christmas season, would have much more aptly been called RACE, as its large and talented cast chews up the scenery, packing every sentence with some racial insult. A funny and sometimes downright hilarious movie, RACE, I mean CRASH, is directed and co-written by Paul Haggis, the Oscar nominated writer of MILLION DOLLAR BABY. Populated with characters who are all stereotypes, the complicated story feels more like a fascinating writing exercise than it does a movie, in which you normally expect characters that are more genuine and coincidences that aren't around every single corner. But that is more...'
teaser => 'CRASH, is directed and co-written by Paul Haggis, the Oscar nominated writer of MILLION DOLLAR BABY.'
title => 'Crash'
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;As a kid I remember watching a lot of cartoons. Growing up in the 1980's, I distinctly remember watching my favorite programs (The Real Ghostbusters, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and Thundercats) and not thinking about the animation. The worlds that these characters occupied were real, not imaginary. They existed vividly in my imagination. I typically watched my favorite shows on Saturday mornings. After school everyday Nickelodeon played a show called &amp;quot;Looney Toons&amp;quot; which was basically that- classic Warner Bros cartoons from the 1940's, 50's and 60's. I remember Daffy Duck being my favorite of the lot. Something about Daffy was just a little... wilder than the rest. You can only imagine the look on my face when I saw my favorite characters integrated seamlessly with live action the first time I saw Who Framed Roger Rabbit. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Who Framed Roger Rabbit is one of the greatest technological accomplishments in the history of the movies. Sure, there had been movies that have mixed live action and animation before (Mary Poppins) but never like this. These were not ridiculous nameless cartoon mice or cats, but Mickey Mouse and Bugs Bunny we were talking about. These were characters that I knew and loved, and here they were- interacting with a super sleuth detective and an insane rabbit that I had never heard of, but instantly liked. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;To summarize the plot of Roger Rabbit simply does not do the film justice. One of the beauties of the picture is that it is actually three pictures in one. It is a 1940's film noir in the vein of Chinatown (the similarities between Robert Towne's great screenplay are obvious), an animated comedy picture, and a special effects movie- all rolled into one. The film opens with one of the funniest two minute cartoons I have ever seen. Even outside the remainder of the picture Somethin's Cookin' starring Roger Rabbit and Baby Herman is a masterpiece. If it wasn't for Chuck Jones's brilliant Daffy Duck cartoon Duck Amuck, I would say that Somethin's Cookin’ may be the greatest cartoon short I have ever seen. At first, we think that the cartoon is simply a short in front of the film (a throwback to the great theater experiences of the 1940's and 50's, where a movie would open with a cartoon and end with a news reel) but then the end of the cartoon comes. Roger Rabbit (Charles Fleischer) has saved Baby Herman (Lou Hirsch) from a terrible fall. He lifts up a refrigerator over his head and then takes both of his arms and grabs the baby. The refrigerator falls on his head, and the director opens up the door to a Roger Rabbit that cannot see stars. This would be breaking the 4th wall in any cartoon- except the director (a nice cameo by action producer Joel Silver) is not animated- he is a real, living human being. There is not a sound effect, or &amp;quot;tada&amp;quot; moment. The movie just goes from pure animation to integration. The film is not interested in showing us the gimmicks of its artistry- it is just telling the story. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Taking place in 1947, Roger Rabbit tells the story of a young Hollywood during the golden age of animation. The 101 Freeway had not yet been built, and all major film and animation production was still taking place in Hollywood. Just outside of Hollywood lies Toontown (another Chinatown reference), a purely animated world where all cartoon characters live. You see, in this world cartoon characters (known in the film as &amp;quot;Toons&amp;quot;) are real. They are paid performers for Hollywood cartoons. One of the film’s best moments includes a scene where various cartoon characters are hanging around a studio backlot, preparing to perform or audition for various parts. The Toons are still insane, of course, and it is clear that they abide by a different set of laws in the real world (they are virtually invincible and are capable of miraculous physical behaviors). &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Eddie Valiant (Bob Hoskins) is our hero. Valiant is an alcoholic, down and out detective that is forced to resort to sleazy spy jobs in order to make a living after the death of his brother, Teddy. Teddy was murdered by a violent Toon several years ago, and ever since Eddie has hated all Toons. It is only out of desperation that Eddie takes a job from big shot cartoon producer R.K. Maroon (Alan Tilvern) to snoop on Roger Rabbit's wife Jessica (Kathleen Turner).&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Jessica is one hell of a cartoon woman. She is not so much a cartoon character as a walking pinup model from the 40’s. Her curves are so fantastic that if she were a real woman she would most likely fall over. When Eddie witnesses her performance at the Ink and Paint Club (a club consisting of an all Toon staff) he is paying more attention to these curves than the behavior of Marvin Acme (Stubby Kaye), the owner of Toontown- who clearly has an obvious romantic obsession with the cartoon starlet. This changes when Eddie catches Marvin and Jessica playing Pattycake (a Toon equivelant of something much more…adult) and takes some juicy photos. Eddie shows Roger the pictures; Roger goes berserk and runs off into the night. The next day Marvin Acme is murdered and Roger Rabbit is the prime suspect. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Toontown is governed by the merciless Judge Doom (Christopher Lloyd). Doom is judge, jury and executioner for all Toon related crimes. Using his henchmen of cartoon weasels (another creation specifically for the film) he vows to hunt down Roger Rabbit and execute him for the murder of Marvin Acme. Doom has developed a chemical compound he calls “The Dip” made of Acetone, Turpentine and Benzene (fittingly, what cartoonists use to animation from cells) that will permanently melt a Toon, the only known way of killing them. Of course not everything is what it seems; Roger and Eddie eventually team up to figure out the mystery behind the conspiracy. Somebody framed Roger Rabbit, and could possibly be behind a plot to get their hands on Toontown and change Los Angeles forever. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;From this point on the plot becomes a mixture of noir, mystery and action-adventure, with the cartoon characters all playing integral parts into the storyline. There is a brilliant supporting cast of adult players here, including Joanna Cassidy as Delores, Eddie’s girlfriend. Have no doubt though, the cartoons steal the show. This is a wondrous motion picture from start to finish. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;This is a movie that only Robert Zemeckis could have directed. Although his recent films have not shown it (I am not a fan of his CGI work) he is an exceptional live action filmmaker. What I admire about Zemeckis’s work the most is the breakneck pace of his scenes and the integration of magic into his movies. A Zemeckis film never feels long or boring, because he does not want you to feel this way. The camera is always moving, the plot always progressing from one plot point to another. Many directors can make “quick” pictures, but most aren’t masters of pace. The pace of a film is not just about its plot progression, but the mixture of the progression along with character development. We get to know Eddie, the Judge, and Roger based on how they behave- not lengthy exposition or archetype. The special effects that Zemeckis creates, not only in Roger Rabbit, but also in his Back to the Future Trilogy and Forrest Gump, are always in service of the story. It is not shock and awe, but story and wonder. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;That is not to discredit the film as elementary. On the contrary, what an amazing technological achievement this is! Who Framed Roger Rabbit must be one of the most technologically complex motion pictures ever made. This film was made over a period of four years in the mid 1980’s. There is not a CGI or computer shot in the entire film. Every frame of animation is hand drawn and then printed on top of the film image. This is a painstaking process, each frame taking hours upon hours to draw, ink and then implement. Richard Williams, the director of animation (who received a special Oscar for his work in this film) had the thankless job of animating the content into the film. Several rules of traditional animation are broken here. For example, most animation (specifically in this time period) focused on a non moving camera and a flat background. In Roger Rabbit, the camera moves around the Toons constantly- forcing them to have a level of depth and dimension unprecedented in any hand drawn animation before or since. Every frame of animation had to be highlighted with an aura, so that there would be a glow around the Toons when they are in the frame with live action actors. This glow prevented the cheap “cut and paste” look of previous integration projects (such as Mary Poppins) while also truly making the Toons look like they exist in the same plane as their human counterparts. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The physical effects and editing of the picture are also tremendous. Every live action piece of film involving cartoons had to be mimed; the “invisible man” technique had to be used in virtually every shot. When you really wrap your head around this, becomes an even more impressive accomplishment. Not only does the animation have to be created- but it has to be integrated. The Toons are not merely walking next to the humans, but touching them, interacting with the actors and their environment. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;For example, there is a scene at the beginning of the picture where Jessica Rabbit is seducing Eddie Valiant. Jessica messes Eddie’s hair, picks up his tie, and then kisses him, leaving the slightest smudge of lipstick on his cheek. This was purely acted by Bob Hoskins, and no one else. In all reality, there is no one there. Jessica has not been input in the frame yet. Instead, the physical effects team has fishing wire on Hoskins tie, so that it can slowly come up when “Jessica” is grabbing it. Eddie’s hair is rustled from behind him using wires and “invisible” techniques as well. Finally the slight smudge of lipstick is actual animation simply edited into the frame. In a nutshell, this two minute scene is a technological and logistical nightmare, but Zemeckis, Williams and Editor Arthur Schmidt (who also won an Oscar) pull it off. This was only a two minute scene in the picture. There are over 50 minutes of animation. Do the math. Now think about scenes involving Roger Rabbit being in a sink. The water has to shake on its own. Think about the octopus in the Ink and Paint club that is serving drinks. The drinks were required to “float” in the air, and the animation was then drawn around the actual film footage. Each frame of film was printed as a still photograph and then animators used animation paper (which is as thin as tracing paper) over the photographs to animate into the scenes. I cannot imagine how much work would go into these scenes, let alone the animated car chase in the film.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Once one realizes how much work was involved in this film, it is easy to realize how grand the Bob Hoskins performance is. This is one of great underrated performances of all time. There was no green screen in the making of Who Framed Roger Rabbit. When Hoskins is on the screen he is spending 80% of the time talking to thin air. Sure, Charles Fleischer is talking off screen and giving Hoskins his lines, but Hoskins is still required to act, look at, and interact with characters who are simply not there. He is in every scene in the entire picture. Every time Hoskins is grabbing onto Roger he is actually just cupping his hands, as if grabbing the hand of an invisible person. His performance is remarkable. There is never a second when we don’t fully believe that Eddie Valiant is interacting with his Toon counterparts. Bob even is able to look at the Toons in the eyes, as if he knows specifically where they are at all points in time. This is an Academy Award worthy performance, specifically considering a great deal of his performance is essentially mime. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;If any of these factors would have failed, the movie would have as well. Instead, the technology works, the live action story works, and the animation succeeds. Top it all off with the brilliant direction by Zemeckis along with a rousing “Old Hollywood” score by Alan Silvestri and Who Framed Roger Rabbit became an American Masterpiece. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Watching the film the other night, on my big green couch with my daughter lying next to me, I realized how much I missed traditional animation. Computer animation is brilliant (the Pixar films in particular are all masterpieces in their own right) but CGI animation simply lacks the heart and soul of hand drawn artistry. There is a beauty in these characters; a nostalgia to them. I forgot how much I loved Daffy Duck when I watched him battle Donald with dueling pianos. I love these characters and I love this story. They seem to be in the right environment. If cartoons really did live, I believe they would live in 1940’s Hollywood, with the fancy muscle cars and the art deco buildings. There is a certain level of class, and even danger, about old animation that we simply don’t see anymore. Williams and Zemeckis got everything right even when creating Roger. They have gone on record stating that they wanted the beauty of Disney, the characterization of Warner Bros, and the humor of Tex Avery. They got it all right. These cartoon characters are classic. Timeless. When the movie was over I was a little sad, my daughter did not know who some of these great characters were. Cartoons today are too safe and watered down due to nonsensical ‘political” reasons. Give me Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck with a stick of dynamite any day compared to Dora and Boots, or Bob the Builder. Who Framed Roger Rabbit is a movie that needs to be preserved. Show your kids. Before it begins tell them: This is what magic looks like. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;'
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title => 'Who Framed Roger Rabbit?'
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short-body => 'As a kid I remember watching a lot of cartoons. Growing up in the 1980's, I distinctly remember watching my favorite programs (The Real Ghostbusters, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and Thundercats) and not thinking about the animation. The worlds that these characters occupied were real, not imaginary. They existed vividly in my imagination. I typically watched my favorite shows on Saturday mornings. After school everyday Nickelodeon played a show called "Looney Toons" which was basically that- classic Warner Bros cartoons from the 1940's, 50's and 60's. I remember Daffy Duck being my favorite of the lot. Something about Daffy was just a ...'
teaser => 'One of the greatest technological accomplishments in the history of the movies.'
title => 'Who Framed Roger Rabbit?'
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__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;David Lynch’s Mulholland Dr is one great mind game. Here is a movie that challenges the viewer to not sit passively and watch the events unfold on the screen but to be actively engaged. It is a film in which you never can quite remember what comes next. As soon as it is over you want to rewind it and watch it again, because you obviously missed something. The film truly defies genre. It is a mystery, a thriller, romance and noir, all while also being a concept film. You think you have it figured out and then all of sudden you remember a certain scene and double back on yourself. It is a movie that forces the viewer to think- what a marvelous concept. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The plot cannot be easily summarized. I will do my best. The movie surrounds several seemingly unrelated but interconnected storylines. Betty (Naomi Watts) is a gorgeous, plucky blonde who just arrived in Hollywood from Deep River Ontario. She is enthusiastic and excited about being in the big city for the first time. She always has a grin on her face but something always seems a little ‘off’ with her. She arrives in Los Angeles and stays at her Aunt Ruth’s House. Her landlady Coco (Golden Age star Ann Miller) has a personality of her own and gives Betty the key to her Aunt’s apartment, along with some privacy. As Betty is unpacking, she finds a beautiful brunette (Laura Elena Harring) taking a shower. At first, Betty thinks the brunette must have had an arrangement with her Aunt- after all, it makes little sense for someone to walk into a stranger’s house, strip off their clothes and use their shower. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;This brunette was involved in a car accident on Mulholland Drive. The beginning of the film shows the brunette, still nameless, in a back of a limousine. A man in the front of the limo pulls a gun on her and then all of a sudden the vehicle is rear ended by speeding teenagers. The brunette survives with a case of amnesia and stumbles to Betty’s Aunt’s home, where she squats. The brunette has no idea who she is, how she got to the house, or why her head is bleeding. She looks up at a vintage movie poster of Gilda starring Rita Hayworth, and decides that Rita is as good a name as any. This is the name she uses when Betty finally realizes the brunette is not a friend of her Aunt. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Together, the two women try to figure out who “Rita” really is, Nancy Drew style. The only thing that Rita can remember is Mulholland Drive. Betty decides to make an anonymous call to the police to see if there was an accident reported on Mulholland. Sure enough, there was an accident. This answers little. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;As Betty and Rita are enjoying coffee and conversation at the local Winky’s (more on Winky’s later) a waitress comes to the table to drop off the check. The waitress’ name is Diane. This sparks a revelation in Rita- she remembers the name Diane Selwyn. Could this be her name? The two women find the name in the phonebook and call the number. We see the phone ring in an undisclosed location. The phone is on a table, next to a red lamp. No one answers. The two women decide to pay a visit. After being accosted by a women who appears to know Diane (and not like her too much, at the moment) they find Diane’s apartment. There is a rotting corpse inside. Who is the dead woman? Who is Rita? No one ever thinks to ask who Betty is. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Another seemingly unrelated storyline involves a filmmaker named Adam Kesher (Justin Theroux). Kesher is directing a picture entitled The Sylvia North Story and is in the process of recasting the lead actress. There is clearly something going on behind the scenes here, because the mob is deeply interested in who gets the part. An ominous dwarf named Mr. Rogue (Michael J. Anderson- best known as Samson from HBO’s short lived Carnivale) appears to be running the show and giving instructions to mobsters to accost Kesher. When Kesher is brought into a production meeting with the executive producer, the Castiligani brothers (Dan Hedaya and Angelo Badalamenti) are there as well. The mobsters demand that Kesher hire a particular girl, Camilla Rhodes (Melissa George), for the lead in his film. Kesher at first refuses, but the mobsters put the pressure on by cutting off all of his credit. Eventually Kesher is summoned by The Cowboy (Lafayette Montgomery) who is threatening- and more than a little disturbing, in his cool confidence. The Cowboy tells Adam that he must hire Camilla, and that if he does good he will only see The Cowboy once again. If he does bad- he will see him twice.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;These are only the exposition arcs of the two main storylines in Mulholland Dr. If you purchase the film on DVD, there is a laminate inside the case. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;It is labeled-&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;“Mulholland Drive&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;David Lynch’s 10 Clues to Unlocking This Thriller”&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;1. Pay particular attention in the beginning of the film: At least two clues are revealed before the credits.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;2. Notice appearances of the red lampshade.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;3. Can you hear the title of the film that Adam Kesher is auditioning actresses for? Is it mentioned again?&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;4. An accident is a terrible event — notice the location of the accident.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;5. Who gives a key, and why?&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;6. Notice the robe, the ashtray, the coffee cup.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;7. What is felt, realized, and gathered at the Club Silencio?&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;8. Did talent alone help Camilla?&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;9. Note the occurrences surrounding the man behind Winkie's.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;10. Where is Aunt Ruth?&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;You know you are in for a mindbender when the director is forced to give you clues before viewing the film. I still have not yet mentioned the man behind Winky’s, who seems to be a monster but may also just be homeless. I have said nothing about the mysterious blue key that “Rita” has on her when she wakes- or the blue box that it appears to open. Nor have I mentioned the mysterious nightclub “Silencio” in which Betty and Rita realize that all may be an illusion. I have written no words about the realizations that come in the last 45 minutes of the film. Mulholland Dr. is a movie to be seen and experienced. I had not seen the picture in many years and when the credits began to roll all I could think about was the plot. Now, days after seeing it again, all I think about is its mastery. This is a beautiful film, Lynch’s masterpiece. David Lynch has had his share of good movies (Blue Velvet, Eraserhead, The Elephant Man) as well as horrible ones (Lost Highway) but Mulholland Dr. is in a class of its own. It is hypnotic from start to finish. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The film was originally positioned to ABC as a television program. Each week, viewers would take an hour long trip to Mulholland Dr. where “nothing would be as it seemed.” I have read (although I can’t verify this) that the first portion of the film actually is the television pilot. ABC rejected Lynch’s work as too complex- too strange for the medium. I suspect they still had a sour taste in their mouth over Twin Peaks, Lynch’s great television series that, while a cult success, never achieved much in ratings. This was in the year 2001. Ironically, ABC’s next hit show would be Lost, another cult phenomenon which is just as complex and mysterious as Mulholland Dr most likely would have been. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I don’t know for certain if Mulholland Dr would have been an effective television series. There is simply too much going on, and the revelations in the final act need to be experienced in relatively quick succession after the first act. I have a hard enough time trying to understand what the hell is going on in context to what I just watched thirty minutes ago, let alone nine weeks. ABC’s refusal to air Mulholland Dr was certainly a blessing in disguise. Lynch partnered with French production company Studio Canal and made the story into a feature length film. It is now one of the great movies. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I would have loved to have seen the look on the audience’s faces when the film premiered at the 2001 Cannes Film Festival. Certainly viewers were mystified, but the Grand Jury gave David Lynch the coveted Best Director prize that year. Sometimes you don’t have to understand art to realize that it is magnificent. Lynch was also nominated for Best Director that year by the Academy (he lost to Ron Howard for A Beautiful Mind- an inferior film). &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Lynch is also to credit for the discovery of one of this decade’s best actresses: Naomi Watts. A virtual unknown from Australia at the time of filming, Mulholland Dr. put Watts in the spotlight. She was nominated for Best Actress at the 2001 Oscars and for some time was considered the front-runner. It is without a doubt one of the great female roles of the last decade. Watts is superb when she is on screen. In the beginning her performance as Betty is grating and quite annoying. Once those revelations start rolling in during the film’s final act, we begin to realize that Watts is perhaps the most powerful actress working today. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;And so, I am forced to discuss the film’s final act. I suppose a SPOILER ALERT is in order. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The entirety of the first two hours of the film is a dream. The Naomi Watts character is named Diane Selwyn. Diane was a struggling actress living in Los Angeles that got a bit part in Adam Kesher’s The Sylvia North Story, because her lover Camilla Rhodes, the mysterious brunette played by Laura Elena Harring’s character, won the lead. Diane is madly in love with Camilla, but Camilla does not reciprocate this love, and eventually leaves Diane to pursue a relationship with both Adam Kesher and a mysterious blonde (Melissa George- who in the dream portion of the film was portraying Camilla Rhodes). &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Camilla invites Diane to a party at Kesher’s home on, you guessed it, Mulholland Dr. At the party Camilla rubs in her relationship with Adam, and Diane meets Adam’s mother, Coco (Ann Miller) and spots nefarious characters at the party, including the Castiligani brothers as well as the mysterious cowboy. When she explains her roots as a Jitterbug champion from Deep River Ontario, the guests look at her and laugh, almost in a form of pity. Camilla continues to ignore her, infatuated with both Adam and the blonde.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Devastated and angry, Diane hires a hit man (Mark Pellegrino) to kill Camilla out of jealousy. The hit man shows Diane a blue key, and advises that when the job is done the blue key will appear on Diane’s coffee table. Diane goes home, masturbates to Camilla, and falls asleep. Her head hitting the pillow is the first thing we see in the film, and fittingly, Diane’s dream begins at the beginning of the film as well. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Diane imagines herself as an innocent blond, Betty, and imagines Camilla as a weak and hopeless woman. The entire dream uses dream logic. Betty will save “Rita” who is really Camilla, and force Camilla to love her. Diane creates roles for the nefarious characters in her dream, imagining that Camilla only got the lead due to mob manipulation. Diane imagines herself a great, talented actress – when in all actuality she has failed. The more abstract portions of her dream, including the confrontation between the man behind Winkies, are ways of Diane’s subconscious coping with the horrible act she has committed- killing a lover. The monster behind Winky’s is Diane’s anger. The dead body the two girls find, in the dream, is a subconscious realization to Diane of what she will eventually become. The dream’s climax is at the club Silencio- most likely a venue the two women went to in their relationship. Diane realizes, while asleep, that it is all an illusion, and that the reality of the situation will not change the dream. She slowly begins to wake. Diane wakes up, finds the key on the coffee table, and lays in her bed crying before shooting herself. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Maybe this is the real story, maybe it is not. Perhaps I am full of shit, as I am often told. No matter- this is what I think the story of Mulholland Dr really is. Granted, there are parts of my interpretation that may be reaching. I still can’t really understand what the blue box is all about, for example, or really what the man behind Winky’s represents. I also still don’t understand why Diane would be going to great detail to dream about Adam, away from Camilla. I still have no idea what the Cowboy thing is about. Peace comes from not caring. &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Before becoming a director, David Lynch was a painter. Much of his work was surrealist and abstract. I highly doubt that people had the nerve to approach him at Art exhibitions and ask him what his work “meant.” Why is it that we can accept multiple interpretations of Art, but not of films? After all, films are art. The beauty of Mulholland Dr. is that it is less of a film, more of a painting. Each viewer has their own unique experience. When researching the film for this review I found a video of Lynch doing a Q &amp;amp; A with an audience. An audience member asked Lynch what Mulholland Dr. was about.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Audience Member: &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;“We just watched Mulholland Dr. Is there a specific message or theme? We were mesmerized by your picture, but we just were completely confused.”&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Lynch: &lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&amp;quot;The idea tells you everything. Lots of times I get ideas, I fall in love with them. Those ones you fall in love with are really special ideas, and in some ways I always say when something's abstract, the abstractions are hard to put into words- unless you're a poet. These ideas you somehow know, and cinema is a medium that can show abstractions. I love stories, but I love stories that have abstractions. Cinema can show these abstractions- these &amp;quot;difficult to say in words&amp;quot; things. A lot of the times, I don't know the meaning of the idea, and it drives me crazy. I think we should know the meaning of the ideas, and I think about them constantly. When I was making Eraserhead, I had no idea what my ideas meant. I started reading the bible, and when I was reading there was a sentence. (I read that sentence) and said, 'Forget it' that is this thing (Eraserhead). I should know the meaning for me, but when things get abstract it does no good for me to say what it means. All viewers, on the surface, we’re all different; this is where intuition and inner-knowingness kicks in. You see a thing, you think about it, you feel it, and you sort of know something inside, and you can rely on that. If you go after a film with abstractions to a coffee shop, and you are having coffee with your friends, someone may say something (their views on the film) and immediately you will say, 'No, No, No, that's not what that was about!' and your perspective comes out in discussion. So you do know what you think the film means, for yourself- and what you know is valid.&amp;quot;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Well, there it is.&lt;/p&gt;'
alias => 'mulholland_dr'
dt-publish => '8 years ago'
genre =>
__attr__id => 13
name => 'Mystery & Suspense'
logo => 'logo.jpg'
movie =>
__attr__id => 896
cover => 'cover.jpg'
title => 'Mulholland Dr.'
rating => 100
reviewer =>
__attr__id => 1616
avatar => 'shaunhenisey_1257894002.jpg'
login => 'shaunhenisey'
review-count => 20
user-dir => 'user_files/'
short-body => 'David Lynch’s Mulholland Dr is one great mind game. Here is a movie that challenges the viewer to not sit passively and watch the events unfold on the screen but to be actively engaged. It is a film in which you never can quite remember what comes next. As soon as it is over you want to rewind it and watch it again, because you obviously missed something. The film truly defies genre. It is a mystery, a thriller, romance and noir, all while also being a concept film. You think you have it figured out and then all of sudden you remember a certain scene and double back on yourself. It is a movie that forces the viewer to think- what a ...'
teaser => 'Lynch’s masterpiece.'
title => 'Mulholland Dr.'
type-id => 7
5 =>
__attr__id => 1094
__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;No matter how many jokes about big booties BEAUTY SHOP tosses at us, it's nothing more than BARBER SHOP LITE.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;As the story starts, Gina Norris (Queen Latifah) is the best stylist in a very upscale cuttery run by the flamboyant Jorge Christophe. With long curly hair and a really cheesy accent, Kevin Bacon chews up the scenery as Jorge, who -- surprise -- might not really be Austrian after all. Treating his employees like slaves, he faces a revolt when Gina dumps him to form her own salon.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Although she struggles to find a loan and to keep her dilapidated place in running order, Gina never wants for customers. Profits, however, seem to elude her. The by-the-numbers script has Jorge losing of all of his best customers to Gina and her gals -- plus one gorgeous guy, who acts gay so we know he isn't. Although Jorge cheats, he still has trouble winning in their big cross-town competition. But the whole point of the picture is the banter inside Gina's shop, not the rivalry.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The women joke about everything. Typical of these discussions is one about how much they hate men who cry, with one of them remarking, &amp;quot;I only got room for one crying man in my house, and he better be wearing diapers.&amp;quot; This stylist is pregnant with lots of kids at home from various boyfriends, so the joke about her is that her house has a &amp;quot;revolving door.&amp;quot;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Our audience ate up this movie. Their favorite scene was the dance by Alicia Silverstone, who plays the token white girl who has trouble fitting in. Shaking all parts of her anatomy, she concocts a dance that is in equal measures humorous and sexual.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I'm sure I'll have to sit through a BEAUTY SHOP 2 quicker than you can say &amp;quot;perm,&amp;quot; as in permanent money machine for this obviously lucrative franchise.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;BEAUTY SHOP runs 1:45. It is rated PG-13 for &amp;quot;sexual material, language and brief drug references&amp;quot; and would be acceptable for teenagers.&lt;/p&gt;'
alias => 'beauty_shop'
dt-publish => '8 years ago'
genre =>
__attr__id => 2
name => 'Comedy'
logo => 'logo.jpg'
movie =>
__attr__id => 895
cover => 'cover.jpg'
title => 'Beauty Shop'
rating => 60
reviewer =>
__attr__id => 193
avatar => 'default.jpg'
login => 'SteveRhodes'
review-count => 676
user-dir => 'user_files/'
short-body => 'No matter how many jokes about big booties BEAUTY SHOP tosses at us, it's nothing more than BARBER SHOP LITE. As the story starts, Gina Norris (Queen Latifah) is the best stylist in a very upscale cuttery run by the flamboyant Jorge Christophe. With long curly hair and a really cheesy accent, Kevin Bacon chews up the scenery as Jorge, who -- surprise -- might not really be Austrian after all. Treating his employees like slaves, he faces a revolt when Gina dumps him to form her own salon. Although she struggles to find a loan and to keep her dilapidated place in running order, Gina never wants for customers. Profits, however, seem to ...'
teaser => 'No matter how many jokes about big booties BEAUTY SHOP tosses at us, it's nothing more than BARBER SHOP LITE. '
title => 'Beauty Shop'
type-id => 7
6 =>
__attr__id => 1093
__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;Painfully unfunny, I HEART HUCKABEES is a ridiculous mess of a movie by David O. Russell. After his nearly universally acclaimed success with THREE KINGS, this pathetic picture will come as a real disappointment to his fans.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The story concerns one Albert Markovski (Jason Schwartzman), an environmentalist who is troubled by some recent coincidences in his life involving a Sudanese emigrant whom Albert has recently seen three times in different places. To answer the larger picture of what this means, Albert employees Bernard and Vivian, a pair of wacky existential detectives played hamily by Dustin Hoffman and Lily Tomlin, to probe the meaning of Albert's place in the cosmos. Bernard and Vivian believe that everything is connected, so they spy on Albert wherever he goes, even in the bathroom, in order to decipher his mysteries. Isabelle Huppert plays Caterine Vauban, a rival of Bernard and Vivian's. Caterine believes nothing is connected, and life is just &amp;quot;random and cruel.&amp;quot;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Talking a mile a minute, no one ever makes any sense, and there isn't a single interesting character in the movie, which also stars Jude Law, Mark Wahlberg and Naomi Watts. The film opens with a silly poem about a big rock and goes straight downhill from there.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&amp;quot;Boring, boring!&amp;quot; Angela (Angela Grillo) yells in protest during an environmentalist meeting chaired by Albert, as he reads another of those pompous little poems of his. Her taunts eventually drown him out. Don't be surprised if you similarly feel like booing from your seat to drown out this awful waste of time and talent. I had to restrain my fingers while writing this review. They kept wanting to type I HATE HUCKABEES, and who could blame them. They had to sit through it too.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;I HEART HUCKABEES runs a long 1:46. It is rated R for &amp;quot;language and a sex scene&amp;quot; and would be acceptable for teenagers.&lt;/p&gt;'
alias => 'i_heart_huckabees'
dt-publish => '8 years ago'
genre =>
__attr__id => 2
name => 'Comedy'
logo => 'logo.jpg'
movie =>
__attr__id => 366
cover => 'cover.jpg'
title => 'I Heart Huckabees'
rating => 40
reviewer =>
__attr__id => 193
avatar => 'default.jpg'
login => 'SteveRhodes'
review-count => 676
user-dir => 'user_files/'
short-body => 'Painfully unfunny, I HEART HUCKABEES is a ridiculous mess of a movie by David O. Russell. After his nearly universally acclaimed success with THREE KINGS, this pathetic picture will come as a real disappointment to his fans. The story concerns one Albert Markovski (Jason Schwartzman), an environmentalist who is troubled by some recent coincidences in his life involving a Sudanese emigrant whom Albert has recently seen three times in different places. To answer the larger picture of what this means, Albert employees Bernard and Vivian, a pair of wacky existential detectives played hamily by Dustin Hoffman and Lily Tomlin, to probe the ...'
teaser => 'I had to restrain my fingers while writing this review.'
title => 'I Heart Huckabees'
type-id => 7
7 =>
__attr__id => 1092
__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;For those of you who thought Neil LaBute's latest cinematic diatribe, YOUR FRIENDS &amp;amp; NEIGHBORS, was too upbeat, HAPPINESS is just the film for you.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Writer and director Todd Solondz, who burst onto the motion picture landscape a couple of years ago with the widely acclaimed WELCOME TO THE DOLLHOUSE, is back with his second film, HAPPINESS, which is about people who are anything but.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;(For the record, I had Solondz's first picture at the absolute top of my best of the year list in 1996. It was the best example in years of what an indie film could be. It had unknown actors in a low budget production that had more insights and depth than ten normal films. The actors in it have not had much subsequent success, but, since the movie's brilliance stemmed mainly from the director's creative energies, Solondz's second film has been much anticipated.)&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The first pair of the many bitterly cruel and shallow characters we meet in HAPPINESS are Joy Jordan and Andy Kornbluth, played by Jane Adams and Jon Lovitz. At a fancy restaurant, Joy is breaking up with Andy. Devastated, Andy wants to know if it is because there is someone else. &amp;quot;No,&amp;quot; a smiling Joy reassures him. &amp;quot;It's you.&amp;quot; And Joy is the nicest character in the movie. Andy comes unglued with this brutal display of honesty.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Critics see such a wide variety of films that we become fairly thick skinned, but this film managed to create major feelings of revulsion in me. HAPPINESS, a probable winner in the &amp;quot;downer movie of the decade&amp;quot; category, tries hard to shock its audience and succeeds. Murder, masturbation, pedophilia, suicide and numerous forms of vicious human behavior, it has them all in abundance.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Unlike his mesmerizing first endeavor, Solondz's second film offers few insights, contenting itself with operating solely on the surface level. Like a facade on a movie set, if you look beneath the glossy surface and the talented cast, there's not much there. The relentless happy music may lure some into snickering, which would be rather akin to laughing during a funeral.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Philip Seymour Hoffman plays a flabby, obscene caller named Allen, who is almost incapable of even conversing with a female. The details of his sexual behavior during these calls are shown graphically and unapologetically.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;One of Allen's calls goes to Helen Jordan (Lara Flynn Boyle), one of Joy's two sisters. Gorgeous Helen is a writer who thinks her latest book, &amp;quot;Pornographic Childhood,&amp;quot; failed because her life has been too tame. As she flips through the book, we see that it includes poems entitled, &amp;quot;Rape at Eleven&amp;quot; and &amp;quot;Rape at Twelve.&amp;quot; When Allen places an obscene phone call to her, she uses &amp;quot;*69&amp;quot; to call him back to ask for a date.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Cynthia Stevenson plays Joy's other sister, Trish Maplewood, a chirpy housewife whose solution to Joy's depression is to suggest that she eat red meat once a month. Dylan Baker plays Bill Maplewood, the Ozzie to Trish's Harriet. They live a perfect suburban lifestyle. Well, there are a few flaws in their domestic bliss.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Bill has a recurring series of nightmares in which he is a mass murderer with an automatic rifle, but they've been getting better lately. At the end of the dream, he no longer kills himself after gunning down everyone else at the park.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Bill has bigger problems than his dreams. He is a happily practicing pedophile. He makes no apologies for molesting his 11-year-old son's male friends. And when he keeps asking his son if he's been practicing, he's not talking about his baseball pitch.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Besides the excellent acting, there are many things to admire in HAPPINESS. There is a great Dilbert moment, when Joy tells her fellow cubical dwellers that an ex-cubical inhabitant has died. The cubites are abuzz over the tops of their little partitions trying, without any success, to remember the deceased. She gets so frustrated that she finally agrees with them even though they have remembered the wrong coworker.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;And any movie that features an incessantly perky Marla Maples, in a powder blue, real estate agent suit, giving advice on divorce has something going for it.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Films can be hard to take and yet extremely rewarding -- IN THE COMPANY OF MEN, for example. It is fine for films to be hard to stomach if the payoff is there, but HAPPINESS provides none. It pushes the envelope of decency only to see how far it can go, like some child pushing the limits to see how much he can get away with.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Leaving the theater, your reaction is liable to be complete disgust as if you have been violated in some insidious way. HAPPINESS is such a gut wrenching experience that they should give out &amp;quot;I survived HAPPINESS!&amp;quot; T-shirts in the lobby afterwards.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;HAPPINESS runs needlessly long at 2:14 as if Solondz wants to prolong the agony. The film isn't rated but would be NC-17 for suicide, murder, rape, masturbation, violence, sex, profanity, pedophilia, etc. The film is for adults only.&lt;/p&gt;'
alias => 'happiness'
dt-publish => '8 years ago'
genre =>
__attr__id => 2
name => 'Comedy'
logo => 'logo.jpg'
movie =>
__attr__id => 894
cover => 'cover.jpg'
title => 'Happiness'
rating => 60
reviewer =>
__attr__id => 193
avatar => 'default.jpg'
login => 'SteveRhodes'
review-count => 676
user-dir => 'user_files/'
short-body => 'For those of you who thought Neil LaBute's latest cinematic diatribe, YOUR FRIENDS & NEIGHBORS, was too upbeat, HAPPINESS is just the film for you. Writer and director Todd Solondz, who burst onto the motion picture landscape a couple of years ago with the widely acclaimed WELCOME TO THE DOLLHOUSE, is back with his second film, HAPPINESS, which is about people who are anything but. (For the record, I had Solondz's first picture at the absolute top of my best of the year list in 1996. It was the best example in years of what an indie film could be. It had unknown actors in a low budget production that had more insights and depth than ...'
teaser => 'Murder, masturbation, pedophilia, suicide and numerous forms of vicious human behavior, it has them all in abundance.'
title => 'Happiness'
type-id => 7
8 =>
__attr__id => 1091
__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt;Paul McGuigan's GANGSTER NO. 1 is an extremely violent British gangster movie that recalls older classics like THE LONG GOOD FRIDAY. The best part of the picture is the acting, although the warm, intimate cinematography, full of chilling close-ups, is superb, the editing, full of unusual transitions, is inviting and the rich, ironic music perfectly sets the mood. Delivering frightening, memorable performances are Malcolm McDowell (A CLOCKWORK ORANGE) as the old Gangster No. 1, who also narrates, Paul Bettany (the imaginary roommate in A BEAUTIFUL MIND) as Gangster No. 1 in his prime and David Thewlis (Besieged) as Freddie Mays, the &amp;quot;Butcher of Mayfair.&amp;quot;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;As the movie begins, the older Gangster No. 1 has just learned that Freddie is getting out of prison after thirty years. McDowell's weathered and haggard face looks like it is molded out of coarse clay. No sooner have we met the older criminal than we flashback to 1968, when almost all of the story takes place.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;In an Oscar caliber performance, Bettany plays an explosive character who spends most of the time repressing an evil grin. If the story were set on the other side of the Atlantic, you could say that the young Gangster No. 1 looks like an all-American boy type. But he is no sweetheart. Shortly after coming to work for the hyper-violent Freddie, Gangster No. 1 demonstrates his capacity for evil by dropping a taxi on a delinquent bill payer's head. A cocksure guy, his weapon of choice is a hatchet, and, in the movie's most memorable moment, he uses it and lots of other weapons to chop up a rival gangster. As he gets blood soaked, the music (&amp;quot;I'll never let you go. Why? Because I love you so.&amp;quot;) fills the theater.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Loyalty isn't what Gangster No. 1 is about. He covets his boss's expensive Italian suits, his money, his power and everything about him except his girlfriend, Karen (Saffron Burrows), whom he despises. It's not Karen personally, but her sex that is a problem for him. As he misogynistically puts it in the narration, &amp;quot;Let a bird in your life, and there's knickers in your corn flakes.&amp;quot;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;If you're very sensitive to violence, this isn't the picture for you. My only complaint is that the film goes on for about a quarter of an hour too long. I'll never forget the three lead performances, and I certainly hope I never meet anyone like their characters.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;GANGSTER NO. 1 runs 1:43. It is rated R for &amp;quot;strong brutal violence, pervasive language, and brief drug use and nudity&amp;quot; and would be acceptable for high school seniors and older. Consider it as NC-17, which is what it should have been rated.&lt;/p&gt;'
alias => 'gangster_no_1'
dt-publish => '8 years ago'
genre =>
__attr__id => 4
name => 'Drama'
logo => 'logo.jpg'
movie =>
__attr__id => 893
cover => 'cover.jpg'
title => 'Gangster No. 1'
rating => 80
reviewer =>
__attr__id => 193
avatar => 'default.jpg'
login => 'SteveRhodes'
review-count => 676
user-dir => 'user_files/'
short-body => 'Paul McGuigan's GANGSTER NO. 1 is an extremely violent British gangster movie that recalls older classics like THE LONG GOOD FRIDAY. The best part of the picture is the acting, although the warm, intimate cinematography, full of chilling close-ups, is superb, the editing, full of unusual transitions, is inviting and the rich, ironic music perfectly sets the mood. Delivering frightening, memorable performances are Malcolm McDowell (A CLOCKWORK ORANGE) as the old Gangster No. 1, who also narrates, Paul Bettany (the imaginary roommate in A BEAUTIFUL MIND) as Gangster No. 1 in his prime and David Thewlis (Besieged) as Freddie Mays, the "Butcher...'
teaser => 'I'll never forget the three lead performances, and I certainly hope I never meet anyone like their characters.'
title => 'Gangster No. 1'
type-id => 7
9 =>
__attr__id => 1090
__domel__body => '&lt;p&gt; Errol Morris is one of our most accomplished documentarians. His A BRIEF HISTORY OF TIME explores the meaning of life and infinity through the mind of the brilliant physicist Stephen Hawking. His THE THIN BLUE LINE investigates a possibly innocent man sentenced to death for murder. And finally, what some consider his best, GATES OF HEAVEN examines people's feelings about a couple of California pet cemeteries.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;FAST, CHEAP, AND OUT OF CONTROL takes everything we know about the construction of a documentary and twists it around in fascinating ways. Rather than choose one subject, he picks four seemingly unrelated topics and then interlaces and intertwines them.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;All coming loosely under the category of wild animals, the subjects include a circus wild animal trainer (Dave Hoover), a topiary gardener (George Mendonca), a mole-rat specialist (Ray Mendez) and an MIT robot scientist (Rodney Brooks).&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The prerequisite for a good documentary filmmaker is a knack for choosing the right subjects to interview, and all four of these look straight out of central casting. Each has his own quirks that make him photogenic. Dave has the rugged good looks of the Marlboro Man, George has beady eyes from his meticulous work, Ray wears a butterfly bow tie with his plaid shirt, and Rodney has wide saucer-like eyes when his imagination goes wild.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;In a highly non-linear format, Morris keeps the audio from one section going when he switches to the visual of another. As Ray talks about the colonizing habits of mole-rats, the most insect-like mammal, the camera moves on to the circus performers and people in the stands. Using such techniques he forms a bond between the disparate material.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Another secret of the film's success is the use of an Academy Award winning cinematographer, Robert Richardson (JFK). Most known for his collaboration with Oliver Stone, Richardson's work was one of the best parts of Stone's most recent film U-TURN.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&amp;quot;Its all done from memory,&amp;quot; George says telling us his topiary secrets. &amp;quot;You know what an animal looks like, and you start making an animal.&amp;quot; He has been working on the same garden almost forever. The spinster who owned the house and grounds died over twenty years ago, but he keeps on tending her large and magnificent gardens. Perhaps because George has the only stationary animals in the story, I found this part the weakest link.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Better is the confident but ever cautious lion tamer. Dave grew up watching and worshipping Clyde Beatty, a real life animal trainer as well as an actor in adventure B movies like THE LOST JUNGLE. Morris includes old black-and-white movie footage of Beatty fighting wild animals as well as warriors incongruously dressed in Roman helmets with large wings on their backs.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&amp;quot;If you're not scared of them, you're in big trouble,&amp;quot; Dave tells us about his wild animals. After relating one horror story after another, he admits that most trainers never retire, and heart attacks, not animals, kill most of them. A funny guy, he explains the reason lion tamers point the four legs of a chair at the lion. &amp;quot;His mind is distracted from his original thought - eat the man in the white pants,&amp;quot; he says.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;The robot scientist has a simple approach to problems. He likes to find out what every one assumes and then negates it. Everyone assumes, for example, that one needs stability to walk. After observing ants who fall all the time but are highly mobile, he designed a robot that could move by falling along. The film's title comes from his proposal for massive numbers of small robots for scientific exploration.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;Rodney likes to build contraptions without knowing how they will get along in their environment. &amp;quot;If you analyze it too much, life becomes almost meaningless,&amp;quot; he says. His goal is to &amp;quot;understand life by building something that is lifelike.&amp;quot; His robots may have lifelike mannerisms, but they resemble nothing in nature with the possible exception of insects. Their bodies of moving circuit boards are quite a contrast to the interspersed science fiction footage of man-like robots. Ever the dreamer, Rodney talks of a future with twenty tiny robots for a dollar, whose sole purpose would be to come alive and clean your television whenever it is turned on.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;My favorite part was Ray's mole-rats. Small moles without fur, they live in large ant-like colonies. Among their more bizarre habits are what he calls their &amp;quot;Zen bowel movements.&amp;quot; Their feces are normally hard, except when they have hungry children. Their kids live on a diet of soft feces, and the adults can control whether to emit the hard ones or the soft ones.&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br /> &lt;p&gt;FAST, CHEAP, AND OUT OF CONTROL runs a fast 1:20. It is rated PG and would be fine for kids five and up, but younger ones might be scared by the lions. I recommend the picture to you and give it ***.&lt;/p&gt;'
alias => 'fast_cheap_and_out_of_control'
dt-publish => '8 years ago'
genre =>
__attr__id => 3
name => 'Documentary'
logo => 'logo.jpg'
movie =>
__attr__id => 892
cover => 'cover.jpg'
title => 'Fast, Cheap & Out of Control'
rating => 80
reviewer =>
__attr__id => 193
avatar => 'default.jpg'
login => 'SteveRhodes'
review-count => 676
user-dir => 'user_files/'
short-body => ' Errol Morris is one of our most accomplished documentarians. His A BRIEF HISTORY OF TIME explores the meaning of life and infinity through the mind of the brilliant physicist Stephen Hawking. His THE THIN BLUE LINE investigates a possibly innocent man sentenced to death for murder. And finally, what some consider his best, GATES OF HEAVEN examines people's feelings about a couple of California pet cemeteries. FAST, CHEAP, AND OUT OF CONTROL takes everything we know about the construction of a documentary and twists it around in fascinating ways. Rather than choose one subject, he picks four seemingly unrelated topics and then interlaces...'
teaser => ' Errol Morris is one of our most accomplished documentarians.'
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File Information

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/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Route.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Route/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Route/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Route/Module.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Controller/Router/Route/Regex.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Adapter/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Adapter/Pdo/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Adapter/Pdo/Mysql.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Expr.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Profiler.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Profiler/Query.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Select.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Statement.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Statement/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Statement/Pdo.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Db/Table/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Exception.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Inflector.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/PregReplace.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/StringToLower.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Word/CamelCaseToDash.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Word/CamelCaseToSeparator.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Word/Separator/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Word/SeparatorToSeparator.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Filter/Word/UnderscoreToSeparator.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Form.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Json.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Json/Expr.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Loader.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Loader/Autoloader.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Loader/PluginLoader.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Loader/PluginLoader/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Locale.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Locale/Data/Translation.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Filter/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Filter/Priority.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Formatter/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Formatter/Simple.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Writer/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Log/Writer/Stream.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Paginator.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Paginator/Adapter/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Paginator/ScrollingStyle/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Paginator/ScrollingStyle/Jumping.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Registry.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Session.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Session/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Session/Exception.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Session/Namespace.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Session/SaveHandler/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Translate.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Translate/Adapter.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Translate/Adapter/Gettext.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Uri.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Validate/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/Version.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/HeadMeta.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/HeadTitle.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Placeholder/Container.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Placeholder/Container/Abstract.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Placeholder/Container/Standalone.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Helper/Placeholder/Registry.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/Zend/View/Interface.php

ZFDebug Library Files

/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Database.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Exception.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/File.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Html.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Interface.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Memory.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Registry.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Text.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Time.php
/mnt/fs.9/disk1/local/www/filmnet/library/ZFDebug/Controller/Plugin/Debug/Plugin/Variables.php

Memory Usage

Controller: 10307.7K

Custom Timers

Controller: 2097.49 ms

Overall Timers

reviews
reviews
index
Avg: 2784.85 ms / 1 requests
Min: 2784.85 ms
Max: 2784.85 ms

Reset timers by sending ZFDEBUG_RESET as a GET/POST parameter

Registered Instances

Zend_View_Helper_Placeholder_Registry => Zend_View_Helper_Placeholder_Registry Object()
acl => Zend_Acl Object()
baseDir => 'http://www.filmnet.com/'
cache => Zend_Cache_Core Object()
config => Zend_Config Object()
db => Zend_Db_Adapter_Pdo_Mysql Object()
translator => Zend_Translate Object()
copyright 1.8.0/5.2.10-2ubuntu6variables Variableshtml HTMLdatabase 62 in 1678.9 msfile 146 Filesmemory 20302K of 1024Mtime 2784.85 msregistry Registry (7)«