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Wendy and Lucy

Released: 2008

Genre: Drama

Runtime: 1 hr 20 min

MPAA Rating: R

Director: Kelly Reichardt

Starring: Michelle Williams, Lucy, David Koppell, Max Clement, Sid Shanley, Dave Hubner, Michelle Worthey, Will Oldham

A drifter on her way to Alaska loses her dog in a small town.

An extraordinarily simple and captivating film.

Review by: DainBinder

Added: 7 years ago

Wendy and Lucy (2008) is an extraordinarily simple and captivating film starring Michelle Williams and Lucy the dog. The rhythmic music and sounds combined with exquisite composition and hypnotic acting make the film a piece of moving art. Although simple, the film and its message are intense.

Wendy (Michelle Williams) and Lucy allow us to peer into a part of their lives. We join her when she is walking and playing catch with Lucy in the woods. Lucy runs ahead to find an interesting group of people having a fire by the railroad tracks. Wendy seems apprehensive to walk up to them to retrieve her dog because they are a loud eccentric group of travelers that may not be so friendly. She finds Lucy with a young gothic girl that is very nice and chatty.

Later that night Wendy is in her car counting what little money she has to get to Alaska for a possible new life. Lucy is fast asleep in the back seat as Wendy curls up under her thin blue blanket. She is abruptly woken up the following morning by a security guard saying she must get out of the parking lot she is in. With her car not starting and the security guard insisting she move now, she is beginning to look panicked.

Problems begin compounding for Wendy. She is out of dog food, has a dead car, and no money in a far away town with no one to help. She continues to meet new people and get into and out of dire situations. Scared and alone, you begin to wonder what else could go wrong and does she have it in her to keep moving forward.

I applaud Kelly Reichardt (director/writer) for her vision and individualism when making this impeccable film. Michelle Williams truly became Wendy; her body language, expressions, and eyes conveyed absolute realism.